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  #61  
Old 05-15-2003, 04:16 PM
Gentry
 
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Hey Julia,

Thanks for the info.I haven't made my mind up yet on this subject, but what Hugh Vickers says has a ring of true to it.I remember this past christmas and all the attention Prince Philip got because of some bruises.
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You have your life, I have my life, you do your thing, I do my thing, I understand that you were not put on this earth to please me, just as I am not here to please you, but if we should meet, it would be a beautiful thing.
  #62  
Old 05-15-2003, 05:25 PM
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1.Portrait of Prince Charles on His 18th Birthday

2-6.picture from www.corbis.com

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  #63  
Old 05-21-2003, 11:10 AM
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I think this is interesting, let me know what you think.

8. If King James II hadn't been overthrown in 1688/1689, who would be the sovereign today?

If King James II hadn't been overthrown in 1688/1689, Europe's history would have been very different in many ways. At some level, the question is impossible to answer, because it requires conjectures about three hundred years' worth of history; in particular, about what marriages would have taken place and what the issue would have been. Different people would have been on the throne, and they would have certainly married differently.

If King James II hadn't been overthrown in 1688/89, and if all births, marriages and deaths had taken place exactly the way they did in fact take place, Franz, Duke of Bavaria (b. 1933) would be the sovereign today. Franz, who is the great-grandson of the last King of Bavaria, is known as Francis II , King of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland to his Jacobite followers since the death of his father in July 1996. Franz finds himself in this position because he is the senior co-heir general (senior representative) of King Charles I. Following the death of the last legitimate descendant of James II (Henry IX, called Duke of York, Bishop of Ostia and Velletri, Vice-Chancellor of the Holy Roman Church, Dean of the Sacred College, Archpriest of the Vatican Basilica) in July 1807, the right to the (Jacobite) throne passed through the royal families of Sardinia, Modena and Bavaria. The immediate heirs of Franz (he is unmarried and childless) are his brother Prince Max, duke in Bavaria (b. 1937) and his eldest daughter Sophie (b. 1967) who is married to Hereditary Prince Aloïs of Liechtenstein. Their eldest child, Prince Joseph Wenzel, was born in London in May 1995.

There are some individuals who question the validity of the Wittelsbach/Jacobite claim which came through a niece-uncle marriage. It was raised by W. J. Palmer in "The Jacobite Heir: A Doubt", published in The Genealogists' Magazine, vol. 12, no. 6 (June 1956), pp 188-189, and was answered by Philip M. Thomas in "The Jacobite Heir: A Doubt Allayed" in the same Magazine, vol. 12, no. 8 (December 1956), pp 273-275. The answer is that British law recognizes, as valid, marriages which would not be valid in Britain if the marriage was valid in the place where (a) the marriage occurred and (B) where the person was domiciled. Since the niece, Princess Maria Beatrice of Sardinia (1792-1840), was domiciled in Sardinia, where her father was King, and her uncle the Duke of Modena, Francesco IV (1779-1846), was domiciled in Modena, and the marriage was valid there (Papal dispensation, etc.), the marriage is then valid in Britain.

This the link:
http://www.heraldica.org/faqs/britfaq.html#p2-7
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  #64  
Old 05-23-2003, 02:08 PM
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Guardian claims right to free speech

Clare Dyer, legal correspondent
Wednesday May 21, 2003


The Guardian

The attorney general, Lord Goldsmith, is taking the Guardian to Britain's highest court today to try to stop the newspaper's challenge to a 155-year-old law which still makes it a criminal offence, punishable by life imprisonment, to advocate abolition of the monarchy in print.
Lord Goldsmith is appealing to the House of Lords against a ruling by three appeal court judges last year that the paper should be allowed to argue its case in the high court for a reinterpretation of the Treason Felony Act 1848 in the light of human rights law.

The act, passed amid concern over the spread of republican sentiment after the French and American revolutions, made it a serious offence, punishable by transportation, to call for the establishment of a republic in print or writing, even by peaceful means. It remains in force, though last used in 1883, with life imprisonment as the maximum penalty.

The Guardian's challenge followed the launch of its campaign in December 2000 for the establishment of a republic by peaceful means in the UK. Before publishing a series of articles on the subject, the editor, Alan Rusbridger, asked the then attorney general, Lord Williams of Mostyn, to confirm that the paper and its staff would not face prosecution under the act. He wrote back: "It is not for any attorney general to disapply an act of parliament; that is a matter for parliament itself."

The paper argues that section 3 of the act, which makes it an offence to call for an end to the monarchy, can no longer stand since the Human Rights Act, which came into force in December 2000, incorporates into English law article 10 of the European convention on human rights, guaranteeing freedom of expression.

The paper is seeking a court declaration that section 3 is incompatible with the guarantee in the convention. Alternatively, it wants the court to reword the 1848 act so the offence is limited to seeking a republic by violent means.

The application was thrown out by two high court judges, but the appeal judges sent the case back, saying: "We consider it would not be in the interests of justice to prevent the matters raised in this application from being fully argued." Lord Justice Schiemann found "powerful arguments in favour of free speech and also of having our criminal law formulated in such a way that the citizen can see what is prohibited and what is not".

Lawyers for the attorney general are expected to argue in the Lords that a ruling in favour of the Guardian would open the civil courts to being asked to give advice on whether or not an action would be a criminal offence.

Such declarations, they will argue, should be limited to the most exceptional cases, such as that of the Hillsborough disaster victim Tony Bland, who was in a permanent vegetative state but not allowed to die while possible prosecution hung over his doctors.

Mr Rusbridger said yesterday: "I'm slightly surprised the attorney general should be going to such lengths to preserve a law last used to persecute journalists for daring to criticise Queen Victoria.

"Last week the government was protesting about Robert Mugabe deporting journalists. This week it is fighting to keep a similar law on the books in Britain. It's ridiculous and, in the example it sets, dangerous."

Article From: The Guardian
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  #65  
Old 05-23-2003, 09:51 PM
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Hey Jacqueline,

Once again I have to say thanks for the interesting article.I was born and raised in the USA, so I suppose I take certain personal freedoms for granted.Reading articles like this makes me realise how truely lucky I am to live in a place, where I can say what I want as long as it not slanderous and not face punishment.
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You have your life, I have my life, you do your thing, I do my thing, I understand that you were not put on this earth to please me, just as I am not here to please you, but if we should meet, it would be a beautiful thing.
  #66  
Old 05-23-2003, 10:25 PM
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www.royalmail.com/royal
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  #67  
Old 05-25-2003, 07:37 AM
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PRINCE HARRY

SPORTING

Prince Harry's famous love of sport isn't just part of his charm, it's part of his wardrobe. Always active – Eton cadet military exercises, skiiing, rugby, football and polo are among his preferred pastimes – the teenager appears to have a closet full of clothing fit for a budding royal action man.



From Hello.
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Jenna
You have your life, I have my life, you do your thing, I do my thing, I understand that you were not put on this earth to please me, just as I am not here to please you, but if we should meet, it would be a beautiful thing.
  #68  
Old 05-25-2003, 07:44 AM
Gentry
 
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PRINCE WILLIAM


PRINCE CHARMING

With his lean physique and shy smile, it's clear that Prince William doesn't need eye-catching clothing to keep heads turning. Even when he opts for standard university student fashion – button-down shirts and crew-neck sweaters seem to be among the Prince's wardrobe staples – any girl in Wills company can't help feeling like a princess.



From Hello.
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Jenna
You have your life, I have my life, you do your thing, I do my thing, I understand that you were not put on this earth to please me, just as I am not here to please you, but if we should meet, it would be a beautiful thing.
  #69  
Old 05-25-2003, 08:26 AM
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i see the hello yesterday that my handsome Prince William !

Sara Boyce
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  #70  
Old 06-02-2003, 11:48 AM
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http://portal.telegraph.co.uk

Coronations will always be a time to rededicate the nation
By Ian Bradley
(Filed: 02/06/2003)


When Geoffrey Fisher, having presided as Archbishop of Canterbury over the last coronation, solemnly announced that, on June 2, 1953, England had been brought closer to the kingdom of heaven, he was expressing a widely held view.

For two Left-leaning sociologists, Edward Shils and Michael Young, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II was nothing less than "an act of national communion".

More than any other national institution or event, the coronation service underlines the divinity that, as Shakespeare so rightly observed, hedges around the monarchy. Packed with religious symbolism and imagery, it provides a particularly intense experience of communal sacred ritual.

In the absence of a written constitution, the coronation service carries another very important layer of meaning, providing the nearest that we have to an assertion of national values and ruling principles – the kind of statement that, in other countries, lies in the preamble to the constitution. This is especially true of the coronation oath, in which the monarch promises to govern the peoples of his or her realms according to their laws and customs and to cause law and justice, in mercy, to be executed in all his or her judgments.

At their coronations, kings and queens are not simply crowned and enthroned, but consecrated, set apart and anointed, dedicated to God and invested with sacerdotal garb and symbolic insignia. At the heart of every coronation in England for more than 1,000 years has been the act of anointing the new monarch with holy oil, a ritual directly based on the anointing of Solomon by Zadok the priest and Nathan the prophet.

Not all monarchs have taken their coronations as seriously as they should. Dunstan, abbot of Glastonbury, was appalled that after the anointing of King Edwy in 955 "the lustful man suddenly jumped up and left the fitting company of his nobles for the caresses of loose women". Dunstan and another cleric had to drag the king back and replace the crown which he had thrown on the floor. King John apparently laughed throughout his coronation, Richard II fell asleep (excusable, since he was only 10) and George IV periodically winked to his mistress, Lady Conyngham.

Several coronations have been marred by disasters and mishaps. During the crowning of William I, the Norman cavalry outside Westminster Abbey mistook the shout of acclamation inside for a riot and proceeded to massacre a group of Saxons. The oil used to anoint Elizabeth I was rancid and during James II's coronation the royal standard flying over the Tower of London tore in two.

Victoria was left in considerable pain after the Archbishop of Canterbury shoved her coronation ring on to the wrong finger, and was shocked to find the altar of St Edward's Chapel covered in bottles and sandwiches when she withdrew there after the anthem.

In general, however, British coronations have enhanced both the spiritual aura surrounding the monarchy and the nation's sense of its identity. Shils and Young observed that the 1953 coronation was frequently spoken of as an "inspiration" and a "re-dedication of the nation". The ceremony had ``touched the sense of the sacred" in people, heightening a sense of solidarity, and encouraging the affirmation of common moral values such as generosity, charity, loyalty and justice.

Fifty years on, academic sociologists are more likely to extol the benefits of secular republicanism than sacred monarchy. Is it possible that future coronations will carry anything like the level of metaphysical meaning or constitute the great national act of communion witnessed in 1953? We are a much more secular society now and significantly less touched by a sense of the sacred. We are also much more pluralistic. Can the country as a whole still collectively be touched by an intensive contact with the sacred such as Shils and Young argued was achieved by the coronation of 1953, and can a future coronation be left to the Church of England to stage-manage?

Two significant royal events in recent years encourage a positive answer to both these questions. In their very different ways, the funerals of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997 and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother last year touched the nation deeply. Both had at their centres the traditional ritual and liturgy of the Church of England. It is true that the public mourning for Diana in particular also inspired the piling up of flowers, candles and other votive offerings around the London palaces and parks.

Even in this respect, however, the mourning rituals being acted out were essentially medieval rather than modern in character. The Queen Mother's lying-in-state in Westminster Hall evoked an even more medieval atmosphere, with the officers of the Life Guards standing at each corner of the catafalque.

Can an essentially medieval coronation service still speak meaningfully to people? Is there any room in a modernised, 21st-century monarchy for anointing with sacred oil and investiture with bracelets, spurs, orb and sceptre? In fact, the symbols and language of medieval chivalry that pervade the coronation may speak particularly powerfully to the up-coming generation.

Those brought up on Harry Potter and The Lord of the Rings are well aware of the potency of magic and the epic quality of the quest for justice, truth, service and sacrifice symbolised in precious objects. Let us not throw out the wonderful pageantry and imagery of the coronation at a time when we are re-discovering the value of the iconic and the symbolic.

The acts of anointing, investing and crowning the new monarch should continue to lie at the heart of future coronations, which should take place in Westminster Abbey, although with much more ecumenical participation. But there are other elements that we should consider detaching from future coronation services. The enthronement of, and act of homage to, the next monarch could be made the central features of a new inauguration ceremony held outside London.

Somewhere with a notably diverse population, substantial minority faith communities and strong Commonwealth links, such as Bradford, would be particularly suitable as the venue for such a ceremony, celebrating the unifying presence of the monarchy and its role as defender of faith and guardian of the traditions of tolerance and openness which are fundamental to the British character.

As we celebrate the Queen's coronation today, it is surely not too early to be thinking how the next coronation, whenever it comes, can best retain its spiritual character and sacramental heart, speak symbolically and relevantly of the deepest values of our nation and act as a healing and unifying force.


Ian Bradley is Reader in Practical Theology and Church History at the University of St Andrews. His book God Save the Queen: The Spiritual Dimension of Monarchy is published in paperback next week by Darton, Longman & Todd
  #71  
Old 06-02-2003, 08:04 PM
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Thanks for the pictures Josefine.

What did you all think of Camilla Parker-Bowles being there? All I kept hearing on the news this morning was that Camilla would be in attendance and cameras were on the look out for her. The occasion would be very briefly mentioned - that the Queen was celebrating her 50th anniversary - then a five minute spiel about Camilla being in attendance. Some royal expert (how come no one asked any of us to be experts?! :P ) went on and on about how the Queen asking Camilla to come was such a momentous thing because the Queen had finally acknowledged the role Camilla played in Charles' life and that she (the Queen) couldn't keep ignoring Camilla's presence in their lives. Even if Charles and Camilla will never marry, she is still very important to Charles.
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  #72  
Old 06-02-2003, 08:42 PM
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Speaking of Camilla, I wonder why Prince Harry couldn't make it? I know it reported that he was sitting for school pictures, but really, that could always be rescheduled for something so important, eh?
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  #73  
Old 06-02-2003, 09:12 PM
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Hi everyone. I love the pictures that are posted. The Royal women has some lovely/funky looking hats.

As for Camilla - I do not think that she should have attended something so important as this. Granted Charles must really love her and the Queen probably just invited her to save face.
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  #74  
Old 06-02-2003, 09:43 PM
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1.www.polfoto.dk - 02-06-2003 Camilla Parker Bowles at Westminster Abbey in London 02 June 2003 for the service to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II's Coronation. Hundreds streamed into London's Westminster Abbey 02 June to the sound of Anglican hymns and church bells to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. AFP PHOTO/POOL/Martyn HAYHOW

2.www.yahoo.com - Camilla Parker Bowles and her father Bruce Shand leave Westminster Abbey in London 02 June 2003 after attending the service to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II's Coronation.

3.www.yahoo.com - This is such a great picture of Sophie!

4.www.polfoto.dk - 02-06-2003 SOPHIE, THE COUNTESS OF WESSEX, CHATS TO PRINCE EDWARD AND PRINCE WILLIAM AS THEY LEAVE WESTMINSTER ABBEY IN LONDON TODAY AFTER A SERVICE FOR THE QUEEN'S 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF HER CORONATION. PH JEFF MOORE 02.06.03

5.www.polfoto.dk

6.www.polfoto.dk - Polfoto 02-06-2003 (From left-right) The Prince of Wales, Prince William, and The Duke of York sat inside Westminster Abbey Monday June 2, 2003, where the Queen is celebrating the 50th anniversary of her Coronation at a service attended by 16 senior members of the Royal family and other VIPs. Among the congregation are some 1,000 members of the public, including 34 'Coronation babies' born on June 2, 1953 and celebrating their 50th birthdays. In the afternoon, The Queen is attending a children's tea party in the garden of Buckingham Palace. See PA story ROYAL Coronation. PA Photo: Andrew Parsons / WPA Solo Rota.

7.www.yahoo.com - A smiling and waving Queen.

Even though the Queen looks very happy, I'm sure she sorely missed the presence of her mother and sister very much today.

8.www.yahoo.com - Three generations of the British Royal family - Queen Elizabeth II, her oldest son, the Prince of Wales, and his oldest son, Prince William - pose for a photograph, at Clarence House in London, before a dinner to mark the 50th anniversary of her Coronation. * The Prince of Wales was hosting the meal at his new residence, formerly the London home of the 101-year-old Queen Mother, after a day of celebration which included a service at Westminster Abbey and a children's tea party in the gardens of Buckingham Palace.

9.www.yahoo.com - And with Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh, whose anniversary it should be, too! He's been at the Queen's side for just as long.
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  #75  
Old 06-03-2003, 12:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Alexandria@Jun 2nd, 2003 - 8:57 pm
www.yahoo.com - Three generations of the British Royal family - Queen Elizabeth II, her oldest son, the Prince of Wales, and his oldest son, Prince William - pose for a photograph, at Clarence House in London, before a dinner to mark the 50th anniversary of her Coronation. * The Prince of Wales was hosting the meal at his new residence, formerly the London home of the 101-year-old Queen Mother, after a day of celebration which included a service at Westminster Abbey and a children's tea party in the gardens of Buckingham Palace.
thanks for pictures !

i love it !

I look his 21st birthday pictures then now he wore black ties for first times wow ! that my favorites like past Queen Mother !

Sara Boyce
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  #76  
Old 06-03-2003, 11:12 AM
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I wonder if Camilla and Charles's son would have looked as good as Prince William? B)
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  #77  
Old 06-03-2003, 11:39 AM
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I don't think so.
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  #78  
Old 06-03-2003, 01:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by thissal@Jun 3rd, 2003 - 10:12 am
I wonder if Camilla and Charles's son would have looked as good as Prince William? B)
NO !

only Prince William and Prince Charles both was relationship but as Princess Diana only ! Camilla was half-Royal Family to the Prince Charles since 1970's he been companion to her after Diana's death in 1997 ! Camilla was opposite by the Royal Family you know best ! i knew it !

Sara Boyce
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  #79  
Old 06-03-2003, 06:49 PM
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1.Wills clearly takes after his mom physically. But Camilla and Andrew Parker-Bowles' son Tom isn't so bad looking.

2.www.rexfeatures.com - Princess Anne and Sophie, Countess of Wessex.

3.www.rexfeatures.com - Alexandra Ogilvy

4.www.rexfeatures.com - The Duke and Duchess of Kent

5.www.ibl.se - PRINCESS ANNE & Husband TIM LAURENCE_the couple are reported to be having marriage problems, attend a service marking the 50th Anniversary of the Queen's Coronation, Westminster Abbey, London. _2/06/03 © NEWSPIX INTERNATIONAL / IBL

6.www.corbis.com - A closer look at the Duchess of Kent.

7.www.corbis.com - The Duchess of Gloucester

8.www.corbis.com - Princess Alexandra Ogilvy.

The memo circulated to the royal cousins must have said wear white or cream as it seems the Duchess of Gloucester, the Duchess of Kent and Princess Alexandra all chose to wear white or off white!

9.www.corbis.com - Prince Andrew
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  #80  
Old 06-27-2003, 11:16 AM
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Hey good news !

i read computer said Prince William and Prince Harry will be Air on Larry King tonight at 8pm

Sara Boyce
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