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  #421  
Old 08-15-2019, 05:58 PM
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Very interesting poll and a good breakdown of the demographics. One thing I notice though is that they've got just about every married in female royal addressed as if they were divorced. You'd think they'd know better by now eh?
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  #422  
Old 08-29-2019, 09:24 PM
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To those living in the UK right now and in the Commonwealth Realms, has the recent prorogue destroyed support for the monarchy and ruined QEII's reputation and popularity? The #abolishthemonarchy is taking great stem from what I've seen, some Labour MPs are threatening to abolish the monarchy, and I've also seen the anti-monarchist/republican tweet gaining traction in Canada. So we're doomed aren't we?

-Frozen Royalist
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  #423  
Old 08-29-2019, 09:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frozen Royalist View Post
To those living in the UK right now and in the Commonwealth Realms, has the recent prorogue destroyed support for the monarchy and ruined QEII's reputation and popularity? The #abolishthemonarchy is taking great stem from what I've seen, some Labour MPs are threatening to abolish the monarchy, and I've also seen the anti-monarchist/republican tweet gaining traction in Canada. So we're doomed aren't we?

-Frozen Royalist
I don’t think you understand how the monarchy works in the UK. The Queen is not at fault in this mess.
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  #424  
Old 08-29-2019, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by O-H Anglophile View Post
I don’t think you understand how the monarchy works in the UK. The Queen is not at fault in this mess.
But she is receiving some of the blame, from people who don't understand her constitutional duty, and others who are using this as an excuse to stir up trouble.
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  #425  
Old 08-30-2019, 02:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frozen Royalist View Post
To those living in the UK right now and in the Commonwealth Realms, has the recent prorogue destroyed support for the monarchy and ruined QEII's reputation and popularity? The #abolishthemonarchy is taking great stem from what I've seen, some Labour MPs are threatening to abolish the monarchy, and I've also seen the anti-monarchist/republican tweet gaining traction in Canada. So we're doomed aren't we?

-Frozen Royalist
Other then on twitter and perhaps some blogs Canada really does not have a republican movement. Okay outside of Quebec, but Quebec just wants to be rid of all of us. The politics in UK rarely affect our opinion of monarchy or not.

The reality is most Canadians look at the Prime Minister is our head. If we complain about politics, we complain about Trudeau. The queen is on our money. We might moan a bit about the cost of royal tours but little else.


If the commonwealth countries started gaining independence, Canada may be the last one standing. It would take a lot more then Borris to get Canada to upheave the status quo.
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  #426  
Old 08-30-2019, 02:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frozen Royalist View Post
To those living in the UK right now and in the Commonwealth Realms, has the recent prorogue destroyed support for the monarchy and ruined QEII's reputation and popularity? The #abolishthemonarchy is taking great stem from what I've seen, some Labour MPs are threatening to abolish the monarchy, and I've also seen the anti-monarchist/republican tweet gaining traction in Canada. So we're doomed aren't we?

-Frozen Royalist
When things settle down and people understand things they will realise that the Queen acted correctly.

I remember The Dismissal in Australia in 1975 and the mass calls for Australia to become a Republic back then. I was still at school. Since then I have been to university had a 40 year career as a teacher and am now retired and Australia is still a constitutional monarchy even though a republic is on the policy of the Australian Labor Party, we have had them in power for about half the time since 1975, we have had a republican Prime Minister from the Liberal Party and we have had a referendum on the issue.

It isn't as easy as some of people think it is to become a republic. The emotions are high at the moment but they will settle down in a few days and things will go on as normal.

Eventually countries like Australia will become republics - probably in Charles' reign in our case - but it won't be because of the Queen actually behaving in the right way as she has done in this case.
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  #427  
Old 08-30-2019, 03:27 AM
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Politics and Brexit moves SO fast atm. that already the spotlight has moved from 'what the Queen did', to whether that advice [on which she acted] was 'flawed' - so the Law Courts are now the focus..


Given the speed of events, and the [limited] 'attention span' of the 'outraged' I predict there will be no lasting damage - Republicans will still be thus, and Monarchists the same, with the 'easily upset' moved on to something/someone else, and the VAST majority continuing with 'no strong feelings' either way.
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  #428  
Old 08-30-2019, 03:40 AM
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The world is so uncertain nowadays.
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  #429  
Old 08-30-2019, 03:54 AM
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It is interesting, that in our time, where are everywhere rules how to be political correct - especially on Twitter and so on - comparing the english monarchy to the Romanovs and a cheerful "Off with their heads!" are somewhat ok and not "hate speech", how it is called here in Germany.
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  #430  
Old 08-30-2019, 07:24 AM
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Recent events are unlikely to affect the Queen's standing too much. Most people (and in fairness most media) point out she had no choice in the matter and if there is fault anywhere, it is with the government and PM for putting her in this position.

The worst that will come of this is people to question the point in having the monarch involved in such issues in the first place. The reality is, recent events also highlight the low calibre of our politicians of late, so the choice between an apolitical sovereign or a political president - well for most part people would rather have a sovereign.
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  #431  
Old 08-30-2019, 07:42 AM
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Please note that a number of posts unrelated to the topic have been deleted.
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  #432  
Old 08-30-2019, 10:52 AM
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I feel the Queen, an impartial figure and head of state of ALL British citizens (eh... "subjects") should not only have heard Government but also have championed the right of Parliament: "Opposition MUST be heard". It is quite an act to silence a duly democratically chosen legislative body in a period in which quite profound and radical decisions are made affecting ALL citizens in ALL four home nations. In here the Queen has not been the impartial figure to guard and maintain the rights of all. Let us be honest, she was just used as Johnson's pawn. This was not the best advert for having a wonderful monarchy. The people in London, or Scotland, or Northern Ireland, which voted to remain in the EU will have seen that the Queen did zero comma zero for them.
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  #433  
Old 08-30-2019, 01:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommy100 View Post
Recent events are unlikely to affect the Queen's standing too much. Most people (and in fairness most media) point out she had no choice in the matter and if there is fault anywhere, it is with the government and PM for putting her in this position.

The worst that will come of this is people to question the point in having the monarch involved in such issues in the first place. The reality is, recent events also highlight the low calibre of our politicians of late, so the choice between an apolitical sovereign or a political president - well for most part people would rather have a sovereign.
This is spot on - an apolotical head of state has a lot of advantages.

If the country does well: God save the King/Queen

If the country does badly: down with the government

sums it up rather well I think.

Even if we were a republic we would most certainly have a ceremonial head of state like the Irish president. That sort of presidency works best in the Westminster system where the pm/cabinet governs.
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  #434  
Old 08-30-2019, 01:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Durham View Post
This is spot on - an apolotical head of state has a lot of advantages.

If the country does well: God save the King/Queen

If the country does badly: down with the government

sums it up rather well I think.

Even if we were a republic we would most certainly have a ceremonial head of state like the Irish president. That sort of presidency works best in the Westminster system where the pm/cabinet governs.
The Italian, Greek, Irish, Portugese etc presidents are largely cerrmonial but as we have seen these weeks, they can intervene in the interest of state. These weeks the Italian President summoned Parliament to find a new majority because Italy has to deliver a Budget and without a Government the financial situation would derail dramatically. This while the party which broke the Coalition (Matteo Salvini's Lega) actually wanted new elections. The President blocked his dream (new elections). So even "ceremonial" presidents have a role when the maintenance of the Constitution or the interests of State require so.
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  #435  
Old 08-30-2019, 01:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duc_et_Pair View Post
The Italian, Greek, Irish, Portugese etc presidents are largely cerrmonial but as we have seen these weeks, they can intervene in the interest of state. These weeks the Italian President summoned Parliament to find a new majority because Italy has to deliver a Budget and without a Government the financial situation would derail dramatically. This while the party which broke the Coalition (Matteo Salvini's Lega) actually wanted new elections. The President blocked his dream (new elections). So even "ceremonial" presidents have a role when the maintenance of the Constitution or the interests of State require so.
This is a good point but of course these presidents are elected (either direct by the people or by their elected representatives) whereas the British monarch is not. This is an important contrast.
What they do in the political sphere & what the British monarch does are very different as a result of this distinction.
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  #436  
Old 08-30-2019, 01:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duc_et_Pair View Post
The Italian, Greek, Irish, Portugese etc presidents are largely cerrmonial but as we have seen these weeks, they can intervene in the interest of state. These weeks the Italian President summoned Parliament to find a new majority because Italy has to deliver a Budget and without a Government the financial situation would derail dramatically. This while the party which broke the Coalition (Matteo Salvini's Lega) actually wanted new elections. The President blocked his dream (new elections). So even "ceremonial" presidents have a role when the maintenance of the Constitution or the interests of State require so.



I don't know about Italy or Greece, but the Portuguese president is hardly ceremonial. The current Portuguese constitution was designed on the basis of a semipresidential system, not unlike the French Fifth Republic. True, over time and, in recent years especially, the system has become closer to parliamentary government than to the French model, but that doesn't mean that the Portuguese president who, by the way, is directly elected by popular vote and is very partisan, ceased to have extraordinary powers on paper, including the power to dissolve Parliament on his own initiative (i.e. without ministerial countersignature), He can also call a referendum or declare a state of emergency without ministerial approval and refer laws to the Constitutional Court.


In fact, my personal opinion is that, in any republic where the president is elected, even if he is indirectly elected as in Italy, it is impossible to have a perfectly neutral Head of State. That is only possible in a constitutional monarchy and that is why I think monarchies work better with parliamentary government than republics .
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  #437  
Old 08-30-2019, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
I don't know about Italy or Greece, but the Portuguese president is hardly ceremonial. The current Portuguese constitution was designed on the basis of a semipresidential system, not unlike the French Fifth Republic. True, over time and, in recent years especially, the system has become closer to parliamentary government than to the French model, but that doesn't mean that the Portuguese president who, by the way, is directly elected by popular vote and is very partisan, ceased to have extraordinary powers on paper, including the power to dissolve Parliament on his own initiative (i.e. without ministerial countersignature), He can also call a referendum or declare a state of emergency without ministerial approval and refer laws to the Constitutional Court.


In fact, my personal opinion is that, in any republic where the president is elected, even if he is indirectly elected as in Italy, it is impossible to have a perfectly neutral Head of State. That is only possible in a constitutional monarchy and that is why I think monarchies work better with parliamentary government than republics .
This is precisely why I can't see Britain ever becoming a republic. The system is not perfect (& recent events may well lead to a reappraisal of monarchical powers) but the alternatives are not appealing. Although I think President Higgins is wonderful!
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