Crown Prince Haakon's Current Events Part 3: February 2019 -


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iceflower

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Welcome to Part 3 of the thread for the Current Events of Crown Prince Haakon.

You can find the old thread here:

** Crown Prince Haakon's Current Events Part 2: November 2013 - February 2019 **

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:flowers: Happy Posting! :flowers:
 
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Crown Prince Haakon attended the opening of a new study for leaders of communities of faith in Oslo today, March 11:



** Pic 1 ** Pic 2 **
 
Thanks, iceflower :flowers: This was a surprise engagement. It wasn't listed on the schedule yesterday. (Mind, whoever updates the website is terrible, so they probably just forgot to put it on.)

The second photo is super cute!
~

In future Haakon news, he'll be visiting the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, France on March 18th
 
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Yesterday, May 15, Crown Prince Haakon attended the Business for Peace Summit at Oslo City Hall:


** Pic 1 ** Pic 2 **
 
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Thanks, Eya, Iceflower & polyesco! :flowers:

Here's an English interview with The Crown Prince about sustainability and Norway's reliance on fossil fuel production, done by the German news-magazine Der Spiegel a few days ago (link). And the Norwegian media and some Republican commentators couldn't help themselves from using the Märtha situation to start criticising him again (first time in about a year now), due to these specific answers:
DER SPIEGEL: Norway has more green energy than it needs. It could actually turn into something like Europe's battery one day. What do you think about the idea?

Haakon: That's definitely a perspective. Germany and Norway already cooperate. In the North Sea a power cable is being laid linking the two countries...

DER SPIEGEL: ... called Nordlink.

Haakon: It's supposed to transport green electricity across borders. When Germany has a lot of wind and sun, we can import energy to Norway and store more water in our reservoirs In instances when Germany has too little wind and sun, it can use our extra stored water for hydropower. One cable is not enough, but it's a start.
Well, power cables to foreign countries is a pretty hot political topic/discussion here now, partly because of the risk that it can undermine the Norwegian industry. And Norway as ''Europe's (green) battery" will also (as a news-outlet said it) affect Norwegian nature.

But other commentators and an MP from the centred Centre Party (which is part of the opposition in the Storting), Sigbjørn Gjelsvik, defended him.
He said: ''Kronprinsen sin jobb når han er på besøk i utlandet er å representere staten Norge sitt syn, og det er også det han gjør her.''
Translated to: The Crown Prince's job when visiting abroad is to represent the state of Norway's view, and that is also what he does here (in this interview).
 
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What's to criticize?

The various European countries have sold and bought surplus energy from each other for years.

And surely what Haakon is saying is in line with the view Norwegian politicians have?
 
(1) What's to criticize?

The various European countries have sold and bought surplus energy from each other for years.

(2) And surely what Haakon is saying is in line with the view Norwegian politicians have?
I took myself the freedom to number your questions. ?

Question 1: They meant he sounded ''too political,'' and that ''he should have known better than commenting on an issue so *inflamed* as *power cables to foreign countries* is in Norway right now'' (I described why that is in the previous post).

Question 2: Well, as Sigbjørn Gjelsvik said (the MP I cited in the previous post), The CP's job is to represent the view of the state of Norway (i.e. the government), and that was exactly what he did in that interview. So just an excuse from some Republican commentators to take the current debate on the monarchy (which we can thank a certain princess for) to a new level.
BTW, Gjelsvik went on to say: ''Dessverre er dette synet den sittende regjeringen med FrP og Høyre har på utenlandskabler. Vi mener at de burde være mer opptatt av å sikre eierskapet til norske naturresurser, og at kraften vår brukes til å bygge norske arbeidsplasser. Senterpartiet er imot å bygge flere utenlandskabler, da vi mener dette vil svekke norsk industri og gi en høyere strømregning til folk flest.''
Translated to: ''Unfortunately, this is the view the sitting government with the Progress Party and the Conservative Party (the two largest parties in the four-party majority government) have on foreign cables. We believe that they should be more concerned with securing ownership of Norwegian natural resources - and that our power is used to build Norwegian jobs (and to those who think I should've written ''create'' instead, hmm, not what he said). The Center Party (which, as I wrote in the other post, is part of the opposition) is opposed to building more foreign cables, as we believe this will weaken the Norwegian industry and give a higher electricity bill to most people.''

No, I usually don't translate what the various MPs says about political issues, but since this particular guy defended CP Haakon, I thought it was helpful to those who may have wanted more information about this topic.
And if one wants to know more about the government and the political parties, well, just go to the constitutional thread.
 
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I need an aspirin!

Firstly because I don't understand, let alone see how sale of surplus energy can harm Norwegian consumers. Especially AFAIK Norway is already self-reliant on energy, albeit mainly oil and gas, but steps have been taken to ensure that Norway will remain self-reliant in the future as well as there are several alternatives to fossil-fuel available to Norway.
So to me that's party-political squabble.

And what is the poor man supposed to do? If what he says is in line with the government, that's it. Criticize the government, rather than Haakon.
That's criticism just for the sake of criticism.
 
I need an aspirin!

Firstly because I don't understand, let alone see how sale of surplus energy can harm Norwegian consumers. Especially AFAIK Norway is already self-reliant on energy, albeit mainly oil and gas, but steps have been taken to ensure that Norway will remain self-reliant in the future as well as there are several alternatives to fossil-fuel available to Norway.
So to me that's party-political squabble.

And what is the poor man supposed to do? If what he says is in line with the government, that's it. Criticize the government, rather than Haakon.
That's criticism just for the sake of criticism.


Agreed! I think he rather deserves an award for his enduring commitment for the environment and sustainability!
 
I need an aspirin!

(1) Firstly because I don't understand, let alone see how sale of surplus energy can harm Norwegian consumers. Especially AFAIK Norway is already self-reliant on energy, albeit mainly oil and gas, but steps have been taken to ensure that Norway will remain self-reliant in the future as well as there are several alternatives to fossil-fuel available to Norway.
So to me that's party-political squabble.

(2) And what is the poor man supposed to do? If what he says is in line with the government, that's it. Criticize the government, rather than Haakon.
That's criticism just for the sake of criticism.
1. Well, to explain it shortly: A range of various experts and a bunch of politicians from the opposition parties who have consulted with them fear that *power cables to foreign countries* will lead to higher electricity bills for ordinary Norwegians and ''our companies,'' hence the ''undermining of Norwegian industry.''
Why? Because let's say we sell energy to other European countries, which means that we will become more integrated into the European power market and that may cause their ''higher'' prices spreading over here.

2. They meant (the Republican commentators, I mean) that he shouldn't have done the interview in the first place.
But anyway, it was most likely cleared with the government, and as I said in the above posts, his answers were in line with their view.

??
 
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