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  #141  
Old 05-03-2016, 03:16 PM
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Well, after a general election. The Queen usually appoint a Royal Investigator, based on who a majority of the individual party-leaders recommend.

The Royal Investigator then probes the possibilities for forming a government - usually with himself as the leader.
The Royal Investigator then returns to the Queen and inform her that he now has a majority for forming a government. Again usually with himself as the PM.
The Queen then formally request him to form a government.

The Royal Investigator returns with the persons he wish to form a government with, requesting her approval. Of course the Queen know in advance who is coming.
The Queen approves the future ministers with her signature and at the same time they are presented to her - after all it's her they are working for and all the authority they have is in her name.

The ministers now go to the individual ministries where they have a little ceremony and formally take over, also by signing a paper. That is to ensure that it is always clear who is running what at any given time. And from that moment the new government ministers are in office - and that also applies to the PM.

Alternatively, if after a general election the government is still in majority, the majority of the party-leaders will simply point to the acting PM. Who will then inform the Queen that the government has a majority to continue and the Queen approves with her signature, for the records. But unless there is a government reshuffle there is no formal take-over at the ministries.
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  #142  
Old 11-13-2016, 02:45 PM
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Summary of a Q&A in Billed Bladet #45, 2016.

Where a Kalle Jacobsen asks that since QMII as the Monarch is the Commander-in-Chief, and as such also the military intelligence agency FET. Is she as such also the head of PET (the police intelligence service)?

Jon Bloch Skipper responds yes and no.
PET is under the Ministry of Justice, just like the rest of the police.
All government, regional and municipal authority in DK is in the name of the Monarch, legitimized by the signature of the Monarch (or Regent of Rigsforstander).
So technically she is head of PET, since they act in her name, but in reality PET is administered by the government, I.e. the Minister of Justice.
So QMII can't call the head of PET and order something.
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  #143  
Old 11-27-2016, 10:08 AM
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Tomorrow Monday, a new government will be presented outside Amalienborg.

The current one-party government will be expanded with two more parties. The PM hopes this will help the right side of the Parliament to better co-operate. (And keep him in power...). - But it still takes at least 90 seats to have a majority and that is not the case. The new government will remain a minority-government. - And from a personal view I fear it will be a government with a pretty asocial politics if they had the had the majority to do what they want. So at the next general election I cannot see myself vote Liberal (the PM's party) as I have for many years. Not with that constellation of parties! Being Liberal IMO doesn't mean you have to kick the poor, sick and unfortunate.

Anyway, what happens is that the PM, Lars Løkke, tomorrow go to QMII and request she accept the resignation of the current government and at the same time he will inform her that he has not got a majority in the Parliament against him forming a new government, with him as PM (*). As such he will request that she accept a new government with him continuing as PM. - QMII will naturally accept.
Then the PM will present her with a new list of ministers and ask for QMII's approval. She will accept.
The ministers who are to leave their offices will later go to QMII and offer their resignation. Which she will accept and at the same time thank them for their service.
Then the new ministers will go to QMII and request that she approve of them. That QMII will do.

The new government will then be officially presented in front of Amalienborg. Then the formal handing over will take place in the various ministries in the hours to follow. And by mid-afternoon tomorrow we will have a new functioning government in DK.

(*) A government need not have a majority of seats voting for the government.
It only needs a majority of seats in the Parliament not voting against it.
Needless to say that it is much easier to govern if you have a majority of seats, but many if not most Danish governments have been minority governments, which means they often have had to work with the opposition.
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  #144  
Old 11-27-2016, 01:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Tomorrow Monday, a new government will be presented outside Amalienborg.

The current one-party government will be expanded with two more parties. The PM hopes this will help the right side of the Parliament to better co-operate. (And keep him in power...). - But it still takes at least 90 seats to have a majority and that is not the case. The new government will remain a minority-government. - And from a personal view I fear it will be a government with a pretty asocial politics if they had the had the majority to do what they want. So at the next general election I cannot see myself vote Liberal (the PM's party) as I have for many years. Not with that constellation of parties! Being Liberal IMO doesn't mean you have to kick the poor, sick and unfortunate.

Anyway, what happens is that the PM, Lars Løkke, tomorrow go to QMII and request she accept the resignation of the current government and at the same time he will inform her that he has not got a majority in the Parliament against him forming a new government, with him as PM (*). As such he will request that she accept a new government with him continuing as PM. - QMII will naturally accept.
Then the PM will present her with a new list of ministers and ask for QMII's approval. She will accept.
The ministers who are to leave their offices will later go to QMII and offer their resignation. Which she will accept and at the same time thank them for their service.
Then the new ministers will go to QMII and request that she approve of them. That QMII will do.

The new government will then be officially presented in front of Amalienborg. Then the formal handing over will take place in the various ministries in the hours to follow. And by mid-afternoon tomorrow we will have a new functioning government in DK.

(*) A government need not have a majority of seats voting for the government.
It only needs a majority of seats in the Parliament not voting against it.
Needless to say that it is much easier to govern if you have a majority of seats, but many if not most Danish governments have been minority governments, which means they often have had to work with the opposition.
Thanks for this note, as always, Muhler! I shall look forward to further developments in this interesting period in Danish political history!
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  #145  
Old 11-28-2016, 11:31 AM
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more on the new government formation today.
Regeringsdannelse | Kongehuset
Præsentation af ny regering | Kongehuset

Today, there were also public audiences scheduled, which Frederik took over for the Queen

"Public audience at Christiansborg Palace at. 10:00.
As a result of H.M. The Queen receives government Lars Løkke Rasmussen III, handled the public audience by HRH the Crown Prince."
Offentlig audiens | Kongehuset
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  #146  
Old 11-28-2016, 02:46 PM
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Thanks, polyesco.

Yes, now the PM, Lars Løkke, has ensured he can sit in his chair for at least one more year. - But at a very high prize for one of the coalition parties! Liberal Alliance. They just haven't realized it yet...

Well, I won't shed a tear seeing that party going into a complete meltdown. A more apt name for that party would IMO be Selfish Alliance.
But at least the biggest, shall we say, empathy-challenged person in that party, Joachim B Olsen, didn't get a post. - Perhaps he was thought too inept or more likely the opposition and the support party, the Danish People's Party, would have crucified him at the first opportunity and otherwise refused to co-operate with the government.

The government now holds 53 seats and they need 90 seats to accomplish anything and that means they are totally dependent on the largest opposition party, the Social Democrats or the largest "right wing" support party, the Danish People's Party. That'll cost! - Especially since these two parties basically share more or less the same views on a large number of key issues. (*)
But the PM can remain in his chair for a little while yet - and that is all that matters...
Because had he called a general election now (because he really doesn't have a majority for the politic he wish to pursue) he would have been history, both as a PM and as a party leader and that would, at best, have meant oblivion in the EU-Parliament with the other has-beens.

One noticable minister today, is Thyra Frank. who has become Minister for the Elderly. She actually knows what she's talking about and has many years of experience. And she's very passionate. She has some very good ideas and I predict she will become the most lamented minister once this government falls.

(*) Basically we have two social democrat parties in DK right now. The "old" Social Democrats, who are finding their roots after the last disastrous period as government, where they were forced to pursue a politic in complete contrast to their voters.
And the Danish Peoples Party, which are right wing social democrats with a nationalist and somewhat xenophobic streak. (Read: anti-Muslim, anti-immigration from non-western countries).
The current government is as said above totally in the mercy of these two parties. So the two most influential people in DK politics right now is not the PM, Lars Løkke. But the chairwoman of the Social Democrats, Mette Frederiksen (who is very likely to become the next PM) and Thulesen Dahl, the leader of the Danish Peoples Party, who may very well form an official or unofficial union with the Social Democrats after the next election.
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  #147  
Old 12-17-2016, 09:28 AM
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I thought it might be an idea to have a look at what goes on, when QMII receive an ambassador. Because as you know USA is going to have a new president and the peculiar thing about the US system is that they change ambassadors when there is a new administration.

QMII herself explained it very well.

At some point next year the current US ambassador to DK will have an audience with QMII (and perhaps Frederik as well), where he will formally say goodbye and I imagine he may be presented with an order or a commemorative medal.
He will still be the US ambassador though after that audience.

In the eyes of the DRF and protocol-wise an ambassador is the direct representative of his/her head of state, (I.e. ear to mouth) which is not necessarily also the government. That means that a new ambassador will be received appropriately as befits someone who is the direct representative for a foreign head of state.
And that means the ambassador will be driven in a horse-drawn carriage to Amalienborg escorted by Guards Hussars. (Good practice). Often the ambassador will wear a national costume (*).
At Amalienborg an honor guard from the Royal Lifeguard Regiment will meet him and here he/she will be received by members of the court and hand over (a copy of) his credentials, authorizing him as the official ambassador for in this case USA. At the same time he will present the letter of dismissal for the former ambassador.
When QMII have read these letters and they have been noted in protocols, later to end up in the Archive of the Realm.
Then the ambassador will be led in to a personal and formal audience with QMII (and perhaps Frederik) where he will be officially welcomed to Denmark and officially present QMII with his credentials. (Which of course she won't read here and now, since she already know the contents). - Then the new ambassador is officially the US ambassador, not before.
That's the end of the formal audience.
Shortly after follow a more informal meeting with QMII, which also include any staff the ambassador brings with him, as well as members of the court and perhaps representatives from the Foreign Ministry.
Here refreshments are served and the ambassador have a more informal chat with QMII, - but not about political issues though.

When the ambassador leaves Amalienborg he/she is now His/Her Excellency the Ambassador for the United States of America in the Kingdom of Denmark.

DK is one of the few countries where such an elaborate and formal ceremony takes place.
All ambassadors receive the same welcome.

(*) AFAIK USA doesn't have a national costume but I think it could be stylish if USA adopted one. And since the US diplomatic service started in the latter 1700's, a costume, complete with a tricorn hat, from that period would IMO be a stylish touch.
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  #148  
Old 12-17-2016, 10:02 AM
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Thank you so much for explaining all that happens with a new Ambassador to Denmark. I really do like the pomp and the circumstance and the protocol that is followed to the letter in each case and to me, it makes it so much more meaningful.

I, also, would love to see a national costume such as you described. That's one thing that I think is missing in the USA. It would be so much more colorful and historically meaningful if the USA added a bit of pomp and circumstance to things. As it stands now, its pretty much boring.
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  #149  
Old 12-17-2016, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post

DK is one of the few countries where such an elaborate and formal ceremony takes place.
All ambassadors receive the same welcome.
I think in most monarchies the ambassadors are driven to Palace's in an elaborate way. Even in Spain they are driven to the Place in a horsedran carriage.
here is a Video about Denmark. I only found it a bit surprsing that the Queen is ab bit informally dreseed (if she wears what she wore at the inspection of the Guards) for the actual ceremony. i had expecdted more something like she werars at the new Years Courts so she can also wear her Orders.
https://www.facebook.com/detdanskeko...8711177134136/
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  #150  
Old 12-17-2016, 01:31 PM
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QMII has the advantage of the home turf, she doesn't, so to speak, have to "outflash" her guests.
Especially since not all ambassadors come in a national attire. That may explain her more informal wear. But I can imagine she wear an order from the country the ambassador is coming from and just change to a new one, when she meets a new one.

In fact we don't have a national attire in DK, we only have local costumes. And we also have the problem that a Danish ambassador also represent Greenland and the Faroe Islands, who can sometimes be a little sensitive when they are lumped in with the Danes.

Most of the times the ambassadors come in groups, two or three.
Each ambassador is picked up at Kastellet (Copenhagen Fortress HQ) about a kilometer from Amalienborg at a specific time, then driven to Amalienborg. While ambassador A is in audience, the escort returns to Kastellet for ambassador B.
While ambassador B is in audience and the escort returns to pick up ambassador C, ambassador A is waiting in a chamber chatting with gentlemen from the court and the Foreign Ministry.
I'll imagine all that will take no more than an hour, then it's time for an informal communal audience with refreshments and additional small talk, before the new ambassadors are picked up by cars from their embassies.
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  #151  
Old 01-06-2017, 12:55 PM
eya eya is online now
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Queen Margrethe received today Norway's ambassador Ingvard harbor and historian Rasmus Glenthøj, who presented the book "Between Brothers. Danish-Norwegian cohabitation in 600 years."

http://kongehuset.dk/sites/default/f...?itok=5NDioBis
http://kongehuset.dk/sites/default/f...?itok=Fz4UpkOu
http://kongehuset.dk/sites/default/f...?itok=JpGaIX2W
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  #152  
Old 01-16-2017, 01:06 PM
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Today QMII met two ambassadors for a farewell audience.

One of them is (he'll remain the ambassador until relieved) the Aerican ambassador Rufus Gifford and his husband, Steve. - They were married in DK BTW.
He was honored with the Grand Cross of the Order of Dannebrog for his work in creating good relations between DK and USA.
- I don't know if that's fairly normal.
Rørt Rufus Gifford hædret af dronning Margrethe | BILLED-BLADET
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  #153  
Old 12-12-2017, 03:28 PM
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The description of the current political crisis has been moved to this thread, as this is about QMII's constitutional role as well.

Ill try to be as unbiased as possible, but I don't think I can.

First a little background info.
The current Parliament consists of eight parties divided into two blocks.
Four parties belong to the red block, which consists of socialist parties, - of which one is anything but socialist!
Four parties belong to the blue block, of which one party is really leaning most towards socialism. - Confused? Good.
The word Liberal means in Danish/European context right-wing. I.e. less government, fewer taxes, more privatization.

The current government constellation consists of three parties:
The Liberals = In favor of capitalism, but under control. We don't want another financial crisis!
The Conservatives = In favor of traditional values, but with a human streak. We have responsibilities towards people.
Liberal Alliance = Preferably unrestricted capitalism with as little government as at all possible.
They are supported by the largest party in blue block (they were prudent enough to stay out of government) the Danish Peoples Party = Basically right wing nationalist social democrats, EU-skeptics who wants to curb immigration as much as possible, especially Muslims. - Since they have the decisive votes, they are very much the ones in charge. On top of that they have been flirting and indeed co-operated with red block - sometimes against the policy of the government.
Being in government does not necessarily mean you have power.

The absolute main agenda for Liberal Alliance is to cut taxes - a lot!
The problem is that there is no particular political will, nor any particular wish in the population in general for tax-cuts. Many if not most believe the financial crisis meant the hospitals, schools, care, policing and so on has been cut to the bone and it's now time to adjust that. - Especially since the economy is booming. The unemployment is down to around 4% (which is pretty normal level, since it's very easy to hire and fire in DK) and the businesses are screaming for employees.
So if there are to be tax-cuts it should benefit those with lower wages. Liberal Alliance can live with that, but prefer tax-cuts for those high-earners. Reaganomics you know. Tax cuts for the wealthiest will lead to more spending and investments, resulting in the money trickling down, creating more jobs. - There is however no way in this world such tax-cuts will be passed in the Parliament! There is little political will for it and Danish People's Party only want tax-cuts, if any, in the bottom of the income scale.

Last year Liberal Alliance threatened to topple the government, if there weren't substantial tax-cuts.
I don't like the PM, Lars Løkke, but he is a very shrewd negotiator! He got Liberal Alliance to join the government. They got titles and ministries and in return they got a promise where tax-cuts would be considered - eventually.
After a few months it dawned on Liberal Alliance that they have been screwed thoroughly! To the undivided glee of most other parties.
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  #154  
Old 12-12-2017, 03:29 PM
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Fast forward to 2017.
Each year the government must pass a Finance Bill, for the state budget of next year. That bill must according to the Constitution be passed by the end of 2017. No bill, no budget.
No budget means that the government does not have a majority for it's policy, and if a government has a majority against it on the Finance Bill, it can't rule. That is de facto a vote of no confidence.
What will happen is that the Parliament will vote for extending the current Finance Law, until a new one is in place.
That would be such a huge defeat for any government that it will have to resign.
It probably has happened before, but I can't recall when.

Okay, this year Liberal Alliance learned from their mistakes from last year and insisted on tax-cut negotiations being linked to the negotiations about the Finance Bill, and at the same time they would negotiate about the very substantial restrictions on immigration that Danish Peoples Party so much desire - and for which there is a wish for in the general public, so the Danish People's Party has the upper hand here.
The negotiations dragged on, led by the Minister of Finance, Kristian Jensen. He is also the crown prince in the main government party, the Liberals. However, the PM, Lars Løkke, can't stand the sight of him!

By late November the Finance Bill was pretty much in place, but Danish Peoples Party and Liberal Alliance could not agree on tax-cuts. So Thulesen Dahl, the leader of Danish Peoples Party, went out and said: Let's split the negotiations up. Let's pass the Finance Bill and keep negotiating the tax and immigration issues.
Sorry, no, said the Minister of Finance. No can do. We negotiate all or nothing.
So Thulesen Dahl went out calling for the PM, to intervene.
And so he did. PM called a meeting.
We adults had a chat and now dad's fixed the whole thing. - Leaving the Minster for Finance, whom the PM loathe, humiliated.
Thulesen Dahl could hardly contain his glee either, because that cut the Finance Minister down to size. He has been talking about that when his time comes, we should have more globalization and more immigration and a more liberal economy - This way Danish Peoples Party reminded him: Only if we say so!

So early this month the government parties went out to press, delighted to present the new Finance Bill - and being in total agreement that the negotiations regarding tax-cuts and curbing immigration should otherwise continue, preferably to be concluded before Christmas.

- And now the real fun begins!

Literally a few minutes before the government went out to the press, the spokesman for economy in Liberal Alliance tweeted: That if we don't get very large tax cuts from the other negotiations and before Christmas, we will vote against the Finance Bill!
Of course the journalists asked whether Liberal Alliance would seriously vote against their own Finance Bill, they had just agreed on?!? And thus topple themselves!?! - Eeh, we are confident there will be tax-cuts before Christmas...

Okay, so now the negotiations regarding tax-cuts and immigration are in full swing. That is, they are not! Because Danish Peoples Party and Liberal Alliance can hardly agree on what day it is! And since they are not the ones who have issued ultimatums, they are not in a hurry.
Instead they and everybody else have asked: Will the government vote in favor of its own Finance Bill, yes or no? And we ended up in the bizarre situation that the PM had to go and say: Of course the government will vote in favor of its own Finance Bill.
But when the ministers from Liberal Alliance were asked the same question, they did not say the same thing as their boss: There will be an agreement before Christmas.
- There are rumors that the PM has had his desk replaced, since there were bite-marks in it! He was no doubt ballistic!

You see Liberal Alliance say they were promised that the tax-negotiations would be concluded by Christmas and that they would mean massive tax-cuts, "the largest tax-cuts in Danish history".
But Thulesen Dahl points out: They weren't even there when I sorted out the mess with dad... I mean, the PM. There were given no such promises. In fact it's far from certain we will agree on anything before Christmas, there is really no need for tax-cuts anyway and the immigration issue is complicated legal wise, so no hurry here.

So the negotiations continue. And suddenly Liberal Alliance announced: We have secured a tax-cut for eight billion DKK, and expects to reach twelve Billion DKK. - As in we, Liberal Alliance, have secured these tax-cuts.
That was a bad idea!
Danish People's Party immediately made it clear: There is no agreement. As such there are no tax-cuts - yet. If ever! And it is in now way certain we will reach an agreement before Christmas. Got it!?!

If there is something that can seriously p*ss off those you negotiate with: it's blabbing up about what they might agree on and taking the credit. Especially in advance. - It also annoys the coalition partners who naturally would also like a slice of the glory.

So now the negotiations on tax-cuts have pretty much stalled. The negotiations on immigration are continuing, because the government and Danish Peoples Party can pretty much agree on that.
The leader of Danish Peoples Party has been extraordinarily sharp. He doesn't like to "negotiate with a revolver on the table" but "if the government want's to topple itself" he can't do much about it. He has also labeled the whole thing, read: Liberal Alliance, "a circus", "a mess" and "a kindergarten" and he has called for the PM to intervene and "sort out his government".

The last vote on the Finance Bill takes place on 22nd December, if there is no majority, because Liberal Alliance abstains or even worse; vote against. That's it...

Nothing like that has ever been seen in Danish history. There has never been a case where a government has voted against its own Finance Bill! A bill for which there is otherwise a majority! That is suicide on a government scale!
Because this will inevitably lead to a social democrat led government. And Liberal Alliance can kiss any hope of tax-cuts goodbye. And any hope of anyone ever trusting them again.
For the Liberals it will mean goodbye career for the PM. Oblivion awaits him. With a semi-emasculated crown prince taking over.
Danish Peoples Party are not entirely ready for a general election, so they might suffer their first real defeat ever. - But on the other hand they may establish a fruitful co-operation with the Social Democrats.
The Conservatives are the only ones who can expect a good election, but destined to being in opposition and having next to no influence.

So what happens if there is no agreement on the negotiations on tax-cuts?
A) Liberal Alliance eats up yet another humiliation, while Danish Peoples Party makes it clear who is really in charge: Sit! - Roll around! - Play dead. - That's a good party.
B) Liberal Alliance resigns from the government. - Then what? Will they vote for the Finance Bill or abstain?
The government is likely to fall anyway, if that happens.
C) The government resigns. The PM goes to QMII, informing her that he no longer has a majority. He will advise her to do a Queen-round. Where the leaders of the parties will point to who they believe will be able to lead a new government. And that will no doubt be Mette Frederiksen, the leader of the Social Democrats.
QMII will then appoint Mette Frederiksen a Royal Investigator. Mette Frederiksen will see if she has enough votes to form a government. She will if she courts Danish Peoples Party.
QMII will then ask Mette Frederiksen to form a new government.
D) The PM will call a general election. An election that without a doubt will ensure that there will be a Social Democrat led government under Mette Frederiksen. - Who will be perfectly able to work with Danish Peoples Party and the Liberals while at the same time work with the other socialist parties. - Liberal Alliance will be "The Untouchables".

The next episode in this soap opera will be on Thursday when there will be a meeting with the PM.
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  #155  
Old 12-12-2017, 04:20 PM
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Latest.

Danish Peoples Party has demanded a guarantee against cuts on public expenditure on welfare for the next eight years, in return for any tax-cuts worth mentioning.
The Minister for Finance and two of the parties, the Liberals and the Conservative are willing to accept that in return for the Finance Bill being passed. - They'd be willing to give their daughters hands in marriage as well! Anything to prevent the government from falling!

However, this goes against the very core of what Liberal Alliance stands for.
Because that means the public expenditures on welfare - hospitals, schools, care and so on, de facto can't be cut. I.e. no "less government" in a foreseeable future.
And the new Finance Bill means even more public expenditure as is.

So will Liberal Alliance eat this one?
They can save face on that one, but their hands will be bound.
Mette Frederiksen, the leader of the opposition, will probably laugh herself to sleep tonight!
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  #156  
Old 12-12-2017, 06:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Latest.

Danish Peoples Party has demanded a guarantee against cuts on public expenditure on welfare for the next eight years, in return for any tax-cuts worth mentioning.
The Minister for Finance and two of the parties, the Liberals and the Conservative are willing to accept that in return for the Finance Bill being passed. - They'd be willing to give their daughters hands in marriage as well! Anything to prevent the government from falling!

However, this goes against the very core of what Liberal Alliance stands for.
Because that means the public expenditures on welfare - hospitals, schools, care and so on, de facto can't be cut. I.e. no "less government" in a foreseeable future.
And the new Finance Bill means even more public expenditure as is.

So will Liberal Alliance eat this one?
They can save face on that one, but their hands will be bound.
Mette Frederiksen, the leader of the opposition, will probably laugh herself to sleep tonight!
now I understand where the makers of Borgen got their inspiration! Pure entertainment there at Christianborg! Do please keep us informed pretty please and mange mange tak
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  #157  
Old 12-14-2017, 08:38 AM
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It is most entertaining! I must confess that I never got around to watch Borgen, but I Doubt the manuscript writers came up with this one.

The PM returned today and has hosted a meeting with the government coalition and their supporting party. - Or more correctly; the Danish Peoples Party and their supporting government coalition...
The delegation for the Danish Peoples Party strolled into the meeting announcing their willingness to negotiate - they just needed a draft from the government to negotiate about... at least for a start... And pledging their intent to vote in favor of the Finance Bill.
Something Liberal Alliance still would not...

Now the meeting has ended and the Danish Peoples Party has come out saying that they and the government agreed on being very far apart.
And calling it "unheard" that a government party will vote against a Finance Bill they have agreed on with their supporting party.

The Liberal Alliance still insists on very substantial tax cuts.
The Danish Peoples Party still demand equally substantial and legally-airtight tightening on the immigration laws.
And have thrown in a demand for a guarantee that the current welfare level in regards to hospitals and care for the next eight years will remain as is, preferably increase. Meaning that it will not be possible for the government to make further cutbacks in that field for the next eight years. - Something Liberal Alliance in particular would very much like to to.
Immigration and welfare are the core-issues for the voters of Danish Peoples Party.

At the same time they are courting the Social Democrats. The Finance Bill is on the table, so the Social Democrats can see what he Danish Peoples Party has agreed on. - And with a pledge to guarantee the welfare for the next eight years on top, that means the door to a co-operation with the Social Democrats, after the current government resigns or a general election is called, is wide open.
Because if the government can't agree on the current Finance Bill, the alternative Finance Bill is staring them in the face.

And now the Social Democrats have declared that they will vote in favor of the governments Finance Bill when it's voted about the third time next Friday. (*) - They always do that. Responsible party and all that. (But even here some 250 km away I can hear the Social Democrat MPs howling with laughter)!

That means Liberal Alliance is check mate.
If they vote against the Finance Bill it will have a majority anyway, and Liberal Alliance will have accomplished nothing.
If they vote in favor of the Finance Bill without securing any tax cuts, they will have humiliated themselves totally.

If Liberal Alliance vote against the Finance Bill, the government will fall. You can't have a government voting against itself!
If the government falls, Liberal Alliance can forget all about tax cuts let alone influence for at the very least the next four years. They are out.

The immigration negotiations and of course the current Finance Bill, is something the Social Democrats, The Danish Peoples Party and the Liberals should very well be able to agree on. - Supported by the Conservative from the blue corner and Socialist Peoples Party from the red corner.

In other words the three largest parties, the Social Democrats, the Danish Peoples Party and the Liberals are ganging up against Liberal Alliance.

- So how will Liberal Alliance react? Their only hope is that they somehow can persuade the Danish Peoples Party to agree on tax cuts - very much on the terms of the Danish Peoples Party... And do it before next Friday...
Their only hope is that the Danish Peoples Party can secure a very substantial tightening of the immigration screw by having the government at its mercy - that may not be as substantial if they are to negotiate with the Social Democrats and the Liberals alone.

(*) A bill goes through three motions in the Parliament.
First motion, where the bill is debated, adjustments are agreed on in the corridors and counter proposals and suggestions for amendments are put forward. If there is still a majority for the bill we move on to second motion.
Same procedure. If there is still a majority the bill moves on to the third motion where the final adjustments are agreed on. If there is still a majority the bill is made law.
The law is signed by QMII making it valid. Then it's announced in Statstidende and from then on the law is working.
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  #158  
Old 12-14-2017, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
It is most entertaining! I must confess that I never got around to watch Borgen, but I Doubt the manuscript writers came up with this one.

The PM returned today and has hosted a meeting with the government coalition and their supporting party. - Or more correctly; the Danish Peoples Party and their supporting government coalition...
The delegation for the Danish Peoples Party strolled into the meeting announcing their willingness to negotiate - they just needed a draft from the government to negotiate about... at least for a start... And pledging their intent to vote in favor of the Finance Bill.
Something Liberal Alliance still would not...

Now the meeting has ended and the Danish Peoples Party has come out saying that they and the government agreed on being very far apart.
And calling it "unheard" that a government party will vote against a Finance Bill they have agreed on with their supporting party.

The Liberal Alliance still insists on very substantial tax cuts.
The Danish Peoples Party still demand equally substantial and legally-airtight tightening on the immigration laws.
And have thrown in a demand for a guarantee that the current welfare level in regards to hospitals and care for the next eight years will remain as is, preferably increase. Meaning that it will not be possible for the government to make further cutbacks in that field for the next eight years. - Something Liberal Alliance in particular would very much like to to.
Immigration and welfare are the core-issues for the voters of Danish Peoples Party.

At the same time they are courting the Social Democrats. The Finance Bill is on the table, so the Social Democrats can see what he Danish Peoples Party has agreed on. - And with a pledge to guarantee the welfare for the next eight years on top, that means the door to a co-operation with the Social Democrats, after the current government resigns or a general election is called, is wide open.
Because if the government can't agree on the current Finance Bill, the alternative Finance Bill is staring them in the face.

And now the Social Democrats have declared that they will vote in favor of the governments Finance Bill when it's voted about the third time next Friday. (*) - They always do that. Responsible party and all that. (But even here some 250 km away I can hear the Social Democrat MPs howling with laughter)!

That means Liberal Alliance is check mate.
If they vote against the Finance Bill it will have a majority anyway, and Liberal Alliance will have accomplished nothing.
If they vote in favor of the Finance Bill without securing any tax cuts, they will have humiliated themselves totally.

If Liberal Alliance vote against the Finance Bill, the government will fall. You can't have a government voting against itself!
If the government falls, Liberal Alliance can forget all about tax cuts let alone influence for at the very least the next four years. They are out.

The immigration negotiations and of course the current Finance Bill, is something the Social Democrats, The Danish Peoples Party and the Liberals should very well be able to agree on. - Supported by the Conservative from the blue corner and Socialist Peoples Party from the red corner.

In other words the three largest parties, the Social Democrats, the Danish Peoples Party and the Liberals are ganging up against Liberal Alliance.

- So how will Liberal Alliance react? Their only hope is that they somehow can persuade the Danish Peoples Party to agree on tax cuts - very much on the terms of the Danish Peoples Party... And do it before next Friday...
Their only hope is that the Danish Peoples Party can secure a very substantial tightening of the immigration screw by having the government at its mercy - that may not be as substantial if they are to negotiate with the Social Democrats and the Liberals alone.

(*) A bill goes through three motions in the Parliament.
First motion, where the bill is debated, adjustments are agreed on in the corridors and counter proposals and suggestions for amendments are put forward. If there is still a majority for the bill we move on to second motion.
Same procedure. If there is still a majority the bill moves on to the third motion where the final adjustments are agreed on. If there is still a majority the bill is made law.
The law is signed by QMII making it valid. Then it's announced in Statstidende and from then on the law is working.
This reads like a political ploy/play designed to give its players a good excuse to run up large bar and restaurant bills while working out their differences over a good carlsberg and lots of delicious Danish food! Good luck to Denmark and mange tak Muhler!
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  #159  
Old 12-19-2017, 07:24 AM
Muhler's Avatar
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Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 10,594
https://www.billedbladet.dk/kongelig...ersonligt-brev

You may recall that QMII had to cancel an audience (for the first time with such a short notice BTW) recently, when she was prevented to leave London.
That has caused some criticism because people had after all turned up in their finest.
Now QMII her apologized to each who turned up in vain in letter.

- There has also been criticism of the rest of the DRF. Why didn't Frederik, Joachim, Benedikte take over?
Well, the audiences has for centuries been an opportunity for people to meet and talk to the Monarch about whatever is on their mind. The Monarch, not just any member of the royal family.
Sometimes Frederik has taken over, but he is the Crown Prince and he also needs practice before taking over.

----------------

As for the political situation. That is still locked. With very little progress and very little hope of the situation being resolved before Friday.
If no agreement is made or no face-saving solution is found, it's all down to Liberal Alliance.
If they vote against the Finance Bill the current government is certain to fall and QMII will not have time to enjoy her stay at Marselisborg during Christmas.
If they vote in favor of the Finance Bill, I can't see how Liberal Alliance can stay in government afterwards and still retain what little dignity they have left.
Some rumors claim the other two government parties are pretty annoyed with Liberal Alliance!
Some of the more liberal medial outlets blame Danish Peoples Party for the whole thing. But there is little wish for tax cuts among their voters, certainly not at the top. - And that is a sentiment shared pretty much with most of the voters in general.
So the next few days will be most interesting!
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  #160  
Old 12-19-2017, 03:29 PM
Muhler's Avatar
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 10,594
Well, that's it. QMII can enjoy her Christmas break in peace.

The Finance Bill will pass. It was an unconditional surrender from Liberal Alliance.
The party chairman went out and said his party would vote for the Finance Bill. The tax and immigration negotiations will continue next year - without a deadline and in the hope that it will lead to, probably not the spectacular, tax cuts.
Danish People's Party has apparently not promised anything at all in return.
He also took on his part of the responsibility "for this circus".

Well, this is the second time the chairman and Liberal Alliance has threatened to topple the government and on both occasions it has ended up in a total defeat. - His credibility is down the drain.
Normally a chairman who has messed up this bad would resign. But I doubt he will willingly. Nor will he resign as minister IMO. The glue to the seat is too strong. - But he will be very lucky if he survives the next few months politically.
It was almost unpleasant to watch - almost...

The PM went out later and explained basically that with this over the government can get back to work. He also expressed some annoyance that the Danish Peoples Party insisted on linking the tax cut negotiations with the immigration negotiations. - No wonder because the PM too would very much like tax cut at the top of the income range. - But there is no majority for it and without very substantial offerings so to speak to Danish Peoples Party there won't be any - at all.
In other words: Liberal Alliance's bungling threw away a good opportunity. And visibly weakened the government and as such also the PM.

Of course the opposition is full of glee. They got this close to taking over! And this mess means they are sure to win the next election in two years. Nothing short of a minor miracle can prevent that IMO.

So who is the winner? On the face of it Danish Peoples Party, who have shown very clearly who is really in charge. And that is correct to a considerable extent. But this has left a lot of bitterness, so Danish Peoples Party may not get that very dramatic tightening of the immigration legislation they so much hope for.
The real winner IMO is a party that is not even in Parliament yet; Nye Borgerlige = something like New Liberals.
They are now sure to enter the Parliament and get a comfortable number of seats as well.
Their policy is two-fold: Immigration and a free market economy. They are even more tough on immigration that Danish Peoples Party and believing firmly in much less government and more tax cuts.

- So if I was contemplating to immigrate to Europe from a non-western/non-EU country, perhaps with exception of countries like China, I would steer clear of Denmark! Because DK is going to take a very big step to the right in regards to immigration in two years time.
That's pretty much in line with what happens in most of Europe these years - but here much more well-organized.
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