General News about the Danish Royal Family Part 3: November 2015 - August 2021


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The we have Ludwig of Rosenborg. He is a dancer at the Royal Ballet and he has indeed danced for QMII a number of times.
Right now there is a series in four segment as to why he is not crown prince to Denmark today rather than Frederik. Because he is great-grandson of Prince Knud.

I saw a part of the first segment, and I was not impressed with Ludwig! Not at all.
Shortly into the first segment we saw this young man of twenty, sitting in his room yelling for his mother to come do something for him. And I thought: Fortunately we have Frederik instead!
The impression is that he (or perhaps those behind the series) is trying to make things more complicated than it is. And also that he is trying to appear more intelligent than he is. If he is angling for sympathy, he has lost.
It is not my impression that people in general are particularly impressed with him either, nor really care. I base that on no one talking about him and the papers hardly bothering to deal with him.

Here is the first segment, please don't ask me for a summary...:whistling:
https://www.dr.dk/drtv/serie/hvorfor-er-ludwig-ikke-konge_150710

I think all of Denmark must be giving thanks that the succession was changed. Thankfully, he didn't inherit his great grandmother's teeth, unlike his grandfather and his siblings.
 
I think all of Denmark must be giving thanks that the succession was changed. Thankfully, he didn't inherit his great grandmother's teeth, unlike his grandfather and his siblings.

Oh yes! Thank you!

All experts go against the premise of the program anyway: Ludvig would be nowhere near the throne regardless.
But he got his 15 minutes, albeit with very low ratings.
 
They need 4 segments to explain why he would possibly be somewhere in the line of succession (if they had allowed female inheritance at least 2 decades later - if this change hadn't been made neither Frederick nor he would be in line...) instead of not being in the line of succession?

So, let's go with the premise they changed in 1980 (same time as Sweden - not sure about the titles of the children of the younger princesses; depending on whether they would have gone the 'Norwegian' or 'Swedish' way).

Denmark would have had:
1972-1976: HM King Knud
1976-now: HM King Ingolf

Current line of succession would be:
1. HRH Crown princess Josephine of Denmark
2. HRH Prince Julius Christian Emil of Denmark
3. HRH Princess Clara Dorthe Elisabeth of Denmark
- Oscar Christian
4. HRH Princess Camilla of Denmark
5. Princess Anastasia Caroline Amalie / Anastasia Caroline Amalie Rosanes
6. Prince Ludwig Christian Mikael / Ludwig Christian Mikael Rosanes
7. Prince Leopold Christian Ingolf / Leopold Christian Ingolf Rosanes
8. Prince Theodor Christian Emanuel / Theodor Christian Emanuel Rosanes
9. HRH Princess Feodora of Denmark
10. Princess Caroline Mathilde Margrethe / Caroline Mathilde Margrethe Ronnow
 
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It is not a given that Ludwig would necessarily have been born had the succession not been changed. King Frederik IX followed tradition and did not grant his formal permission for Ludwig's grandfather Christian to marry a commoner, and in consequence Christian lost his place in the succession. Had Christian been nearer to the throne, perhaps he would have found a different wife in order to secure the line of succession. If not, unless Frederik IX relented like Olav of Norway, Ludwig would still have a been a Rosenborg.
 
Quite.

Regardless, Ludwig would have been pretty far from the throne. Fortunately...

And keep in mind that by 1976 the monarchy, let alone QMII, had not nearly the same public appeal as in say 1985. But QMII had two nice little sons and Queen Ingrid - a formidable support!

It's difficult to speculate what kind of king Knud would have been, but I sure wouldn't envy Ingolf taking over in 1976!
 
It is not a given that Ludwig would necessarily have been born had the succession not been changed. King Frederik IX followed tradition and did not grant his formal permission for Ludwig's grandfather Christian to marry a commoner, and in consequence Christian lost his place in the succession. Had Christian been nearer to the throne, perhaps he would have found a different wife in order to secure the line of succession. If not, unless Frederik IX relented like Olav of Norway, Ludwig would still have a been a Rosenborg.

Of course, most likely at least some things would have turned out differently had the change of succession not been made. If Ingolf had married someone else and had children, Christian's children wouldn't have been that relevant/high up in the line of succession.

I didn't go for Rosenborg in the scenario above. If Frederick IX had accepted their choice of spouses, Josephine, Camilla and Feodora would have been princesses of Denmark - they wouldn't have been 'Rosenborgs', so I figured they would probably have taken their father's surname like ML and Ari Behn's children.
 
I didn't go for Rosenborg in the scenario above. If Frederick IX had accepted their choice of spouses, Josephine, Camilla and Feodora would have been princesses of Denmark - they wouldn't have been 'Rosenborgs', so I figured they would probably have taken their father's surname like ML and Ari Behn's children.

Yes, I understood that. :flowers: My point (and it wasn't in answer to your post specifically) was that Josephine, Camilla, and Feodora would not have been in the line of succession (and would not have been princesses of Denmark) unless Frederik IX accepted the marriage of their father and mother as dynastic - which in real life he did not.
 
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Not that much to speak about.

They saved a lot of money, because QMII's birthday was cancelled. So what should have been a deficit, turned into a surplus.

M&F had a minor deficit last year, but that has been turned around. They too have saved a good deal of money on Corona.
 
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Sounds as if the new Lord Chamberlain is very experienced and has been a trusted member of staff for a long time.
 
Indeed, as former adjutant he knows QMII very well.
And as Master of Ceremonies he handles the practical details of incoming state visits, gala dinners and organizing and advising on practical details when QMII go on tour of the realm.

While he knows the other members of the DRF well by now, he will get to know them even better, especially Frederik.
In a sense, Kim Kristensen and Frederik will work close together in shaping the DRF in the direction Frederik believe it should go. - It has been increasingly clear for years now, that Frederik's has a more and more dominant role in regards to how the DRF works and presents itself.
Not that I believe QMII is passive or uninvolved, not at all. But she is letting Frederik holding the reins. It is after all a slow transition.
 
What a beautiful place to spend the Easter Holidays.
 
How wonderful :flowers: What a lovely day, the weather looks nice too. The Queen's egg is beautiful.
 
Just beautiful that after all the months of being separated they can finally spend time together.
 
Wonderful to see everyone together decorating Easter eggs. Lovely family!
 
It is always nice to see a family doing a simple thing together. Now who is going to dress up as the Easter bunny and hide eggs around the grounds?
 
I also really liked these photos. All together painting Easter eggs, what a beautiful tradition.
 
The painting of eggs, hiding them in the park and let children find them is something QMII and PH started in the early 70's.

And have continued since.
QMII paints Easter eggs each year, as you can see in the YouTube video in this link: https://www.kongehuset.dk/nyheder/paasketraditioner-i-kongehuset-0

The typical Danish Easter traditions also include a lot of (especially homemade) decorations, typically of chicks, hence the dominance of yellow.


It also includes the "gækkebrev" something like: teaser-letter.
It consists of a sheet of paper that has been cut into a pattern, mainly by children - (but I know at least one wife who will make one, if she as a reward gets an Easter egg made from chocolate...) the letter is signed in dots, corresponding the the letters of the child who made it. It's then mailed to the adult recipient - who of course simply cannot guess who it is from. And if you can't guess who the letter is from the sender steps forward to claim a reward, normally in the shape of an Easter egg filled with sweets.
It is all very well illustrated in this funny commercial - you need not understand Danish but do notice the overwhelming amount of decorations in the background.
(It's the second video in this link: https://www.andco.dk/clients/danske-spil/quick )

Here is a pretty professionally made gækkebrev!

And first from a child: https://samvirke.dk/sites/default/f...ic/2019-03/Gækkebrev_0.jpg.jpeg?itok=XgUvByrC
And a pretty advanced one:
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/8e/8b/e2/8e8be291ff02c26af496568859b8ff16.jpg

Tradition also dictates that family and friends meet for Easter lunches. That's the big cold table (includes smorgasboard), with Easter brew and schnapps.
Here are examples of Easter-tables:
https://christinadueholm.dk/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/opdækning-påske.jpg
http://www5.kb.dk/export/sites/kb_d...alleri/Tema/Fester/Paskebord-Greve-Museum.jpg
https://frkgabbie.files.wordpress.com/2017/04/pc3a5skedekoration-2.jpg
https://www.visitsonderborg.dk/site...files/2021-02/Påskebord-med-farvede-solæg.jpg
https://cdn.statically.io/img/www.skovalfen.dk/f=auto,q=80/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/APC_0504.jpg
https://res.cloudinary.com/norgesgr...i6lgav0m/paskepynt-slik-pynter-du-paskebordet
It's very common to go out in the woods and collect a few twigs, after all Easter is around when Spring has set in.
Easter brew: https://jyllands-posten.dk/pictures...TERNATES/native-app-2048/Test-af-påskeøl-2016
Let's not forget the food:
https://migogaalborg.dk/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/påskebillede-2.jpg
https://slagterlindhardt.dk/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/paaskefrokost-1200x639.jpg
Easter-buns:https://www.arla.dk/4949ef/globalassets/arla-dk/opskrifter/temaer/header/paskeboller_thumb.jpg
Basically you make your own smorgasbord, based on the ingredients on the table: https://img.nordjyske.dk/s3/nj-prod...ImLnYeTvxS5-CY.jpg?w=960&scale=both&mode=crop
https://img.nordjyske.dk/s3/nj-prod...QqYHoC40.jpg?w=960&h=540&scale=both&mode=crop
 
With candle light in the windows at Marselisborg Castle this evening, Queen Margrethe wants to mark the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Bornholm from the Soviet troops, that happened 11 months after the rest of Denmark's liberation.


** kongehuset gallery: Lys i vinduerne den 5. april ** instagram post **


Added: Queen Margrethe participated in a report about Denmark's liberation and talked about her parents' visit to the island in the summer of 1945, shortly after the bombing of Nexø and Rønne:

 
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Yes, it was of course to have been marked last year, and even this year, it was low key, with at least the PM attending.

In the evening on 4th May it was announced on BBC that the German forces in Denmark, North-West Germany and The Netherlands had surrendered to the British field marshal Montgomery. To go into effect the following day.
That resulted in collective jubilation all over DK, while the German occupiers returned to their barracks.
The resistance moved out and took up position in important places and started rounding up collaborators. There was a lot of fighting over the next days!
A few days later British columns rolled into Denmark and a British airborn unit landed in Copenhagen.

In the meantime, The Soviets knocked so to speak on the door to Bornholm, the Danish island in the Baltic and demanded the German garrison there surrendering to them.
The German were under orders to surrender to the British only and had absolutely no wish to surrender to the Soviets, knowing they would end up in Siberia. So calls were made by both Danes and Germans to Copenhagen pleading to send a British officer, only a lieutenant if need be and only one, if no more could be found, to Bornholm, so that the Germans there had someone to surrender to.
But no one answered the phones, and those who did had no mandate, and it was utter confusion anyway. No one was really in charge.
In the meantime the Russian lost patience and started bombing Bornholm, forcing the garrison there to surrender. And the Soviet forces moved in to occupy the island.

All that was hushed up in the rest of Denmark, there was really no need to spoil the mood and ask questions about who had done nothing.
Hence the islanders felt abandoned by the rest of the country. They had gone straight from being occupied by one totalitarian regime, to being occupied by another. - And for how long?
Because there was no Allied agreement on where Denmark belonged. It was basically first come. So Bornholm might just as well have ended up behind the iron Curtain.

Fortunately for Bornholm the Soviet occupation was exemplary. The soldiers behaved very well. Presumably it was for them a much welcome return to a resemblance to what was a normal life back in the Soviet Union.
And for whatever reason the Soviet did leave Bornholm almost a year later. Something they may have regretted later... But in 1946 the Cold War hadn't really become official yet and there were many other new territories to control in Eastern Europe for Stalin to worry about an island in the Baltic Sea.

But there was a considerable, and justified, bitterness among the islanders after the war, and even to this day.
Was it really totally impossible to round up even one single British officer? Even a pilot would have been sufficient!
Were there really no one in Copenhagen to tell the Soviets: "We've got this one, thank you. We'll handle it, no need for your... assistance."
There was also a feeling of Bornholm being abandoned after VE-Day. The rest of Denmark getting on with life after the war and Occupation and really not caring that much about Bornholm. Not least because the Communists were popular after the Liberation and indeed had a great election in the first general election after the war.
 
That is so interesting Muhler, Mange Tak.
I swear I will end up knowing more Danish history than my own because of you. And that's ok as your history is always interesting.
Cheers.
 
:previous: Yes, thank you Muhler for the back story of Bornholm and their 11 month Soviet occupation when the rest of Denmark were celebrating liberation from the Germans. Bravo for HM the Queen to remember Bornholm's extended suffering.
 
Thank you. 😄

Yes, the Soviets landed on Bornholm.
https://asset.dr.dk/imagescaler01/h...5/9401723_orig.jpg&w=1200&675&scaleAfter=crop
And the German garrison was taken into captivity, where they would stay for easily ten years. Likely somewhere in Siberia where far from everyone would return alive.

But prior to that the island had been bombed mainly by tactical fighter-bombers with the inevitable result.
https://filmcentralen.dk/files/styl...ges_9/dfi_20110215-151001-6.jpg?itok=BrmJc6VM
https://bornholmsmuseum.dk/media/50...egade-sp.jpg?width=1392&format=jpg&quality=75
A number of islanders were killed and wounded along with an unknown number of Germans. Hundreds were homeless. And that was the basis for more bitterness, because the homeless were rehoused, not by the Danish government, but by Sweden that shipped a number of prefabricated wooden houses to Bornholm.
Houses of that type was also to be seen in other places in Denmark after the war. Not to house homeless as such, but more as a temporary housing for low-income social groups. I.e. people with domestic issues, additions, single mothers, longterm unemployed and such. - Living in such a housing was not something you talked about then, nor later! There was considerable stigma in living and have been living is such a place, also among the working class.

But the Soviets were welcomed by the Resistance fighters.
https://bornholmsmuseum.dk/media/5050/nm-fhm-253143.jpg?width=1392&format=jpg&quality=75
Here a Russian soldier is surrounded by local fighters.
- In many places in Soviet-liberated eastern Europe, not least Poland, non-Communist resistance groups were rounded up and arrested, or at the very least disarmed as soon as possible. That didn't happen on Bornholm though but within days the resistance was demobilized as the Russians took over enforcing order in co-operation with local authorities and later the Danish government. Soon the Soviets contended themselves with routine patrols and law and order - as well as the general running of the island was left in the hands of the Danes with hardly any interference by the Soviets.

https://berlingske.bmcdn.dk/media/c...45/8822328-08kutrussere-i-roenne-havnjpg.jpeg
Things soon evolved into a quiet routine. The military occupation of Bornholm was without risk and nothing happened. So the soldiers relaxed and mingled with the locals, heavily encouraged by their commanders and Danish Communists. This was intended and indeed was an exemplary liberation of an allied nation. The Soviet soldiers behavior was, with very few exceptions exemplary and apart from a few cultural misunderstandings the islanders and the Russians got along, perhaps not as much friends but more on friendly terms - it was after all an occupation and there were no Danish soldiers around.
It was a behavior completely different from how the Soviet troops behaved in Germany, but also Poland and Czechoslovakia and parts of Hungary - where they behaved like marauders.
Partly because they were under strict orders to behave but also because the war was over. This was a cozy posting. Peace. Hardly any ruins. Like the half-forgotten past in their villages back home. And food. Milk, butter, poultry, eggs. Things they had hardly tasted for years.
The soldiers in particular cultivated and got along well with the local children - who often reminded them of siblings or own children back home.
And eventually that also included the local girls. Imagine flirting and dancing with normal girls! - You couldn't understand them, but that was common in the Soviet Union no matter where you were stationed.
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/p...l0xDKWBGD_xzafAzWYcfaKXGE-Id8IPBTM6WwyoIq6cEg
But the discipline in the Red Army was harsh! Even though the soldiers were allowed to let of steam in other part of Europe, that was not the case on Bornholm! Transgressors were simply shipped off and shot, at best they could expect to send to a remote posting in Manchuria. That was also a reason for the exemplary behavior.

While the Danish government was less than visible on Bornholm in the months after the war, at least then crown prince Frederik and crown princess Ingrid visited the island, and here we have a very novel photo:
Soviet-Communist soldiers presenting arms to a genuine, active royal:
https://filmcentralen.dk/files/styl...ges_9/dfi_20110215-151016-6.jpg?itok=9jsvxoF_
- I would love to hear the Commissars explaining that one to the soldiers on the regular political indoctrination meetings! :D

But eventually the Soviets left and Danish soldiers moved in. Equipped with all sorts of Allied surplus equipment I have a feeling the Soviet commandant wasn't that impressed with the conscripts here...
https://www.roennebyarkiv.com/uploads/1/1/2/5/11258347/9074702_orig.jpg

Now, why didn't the Danish Brigade, that was formed and stationed in Sweden, detach a battalion to Bornholm as soon as possible, "relieving" the Soviets there?
Mainly because the Danish Brigade after late 1944 was meant to prevent a Communist take over of Denmark and to ensure that a democratic government could take over and be secured. Mainly in Copenhagen. - And partly helping to actually liberate Denmark should that be necessary. But the Brigade was light, with very little artillery and hardly any armor. The Swedes needed what artillery and armor they could get their hands on themselves. - Against the Soviets...
But mainly, I think, because no one wanted to rock the boat. Danish and Soviet troops facing each other on Bornholm could easily lead to complications and Denmark could hardly expect support from the Western Allies. After all the Soviet Union was an ally, and the ally that had taken the brunt of fighting Germany.

Today Bornholm is still an idyllic island:
https://felixrejser.dk/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/GettyImages-969909374-1920x1280.jpg
https://teambornholm.dk/media/4824/roenne_kirke_storegade.jpg?width=1160
Such sights are the rule on Bornholm.

And there is a major SIGINT (*) station on Bornholm, quietly listening in on what goes on in the Baltic parts of Russia. And located at a less than provocative distance from Russia.
There has hardly never been any foreign NATO troops on Bornholm. Some claims that a unofficial reason for the Soviets leaving the island in 1946 was that no foreign troops should be stationed there.
I don't believe that one though. NATO, and the Cold War was still a couple of years in the future in 1946. And even though various Danish governments to this day has quietly made sure no official foreign NATO troops are stationed on Bornholm that IMO has more to do with keeping things calm in the Baltic. Something everybody, including the Warsaw Pact and NATO, was interested in.
Because there was really nothing the Soviets could do, had say Italian troops been stationed on Bornholm in say 1965.

(Signals Intelligence = listening post with very big ears!)
 
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