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  #341  
Old 10-10-2018, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by MARG View Post
Walkabouts are fair game and the only problem Samantha and their Security have is keeping up with them. Actually, I have visions on an RPO gritting his teeth every time Harry and Meghan stretch way over the barriers to touch hands.

But Reception lines of any kind are different. Next time you see Harry and Meghan "doing their own thing" instead of going up the reception line whether it be three or ten people, take a look at the faces of the people that were waiting and the organisers. It is just rude.
I suspect that by the time they have been through the intensive Australia/South Pacific tour a lot of this will have been smoothed out. It's early days, and they haven't really had time to hit their rhythm as a working couple yet. Its going to be interesting to see how they learn to keep the events moving along, at the same time keeping some of the warmth that makes them engaging as a couple.

That said, I agree that it is inconsiderate of the organizers (their hosts) to do their own freeform thing during reception lines and the more formal meet and greets.
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  #342  
Old 04-26-2020, 01:53 AM
Gentry
 
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Tips on meeting British Royals?

Hello everyone!

I've read various accounts on people who've met any member of the British Royal Family. For some of these people, they met the royals by the way of getting invited to the receptions at Buckingham Palace. Others say they met the royals during their engagements elsewhere in the UK or overseas. Granted, events that involve the British royals are normally high security and its understandable.

For those who did get to meet any of them, what tips would you offer to people who are about to do the same or are interested to do the same?
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  #343  
Old 08-19-2020, 10:12 AM
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Can any one throw some light on seating etiquette at Banquets/State dinners. Downton Abbey table manners stipulate to enter and leave from the right of the chair. Hoever commonwealth defence forces which carry the British legacy of life style and dinning teach the soldiers and officers to enter from the left side of the chair and leave from the right. Armies in USA, Canada and India still follow this rule religiously. What I want to know is what’s the rule at the Buckingham Palace. I saw the Queen entering from the right of thr chair in dinner with Army in 1956 but from the left of the chair in recent state dinners. The guest on the two long tables on right and left of the table were doing it differently. The ones in left side were entering from the left of the chairs and the ones on the right table were entering from thr right side. I just wonder what’s the protocol guests have to follow.
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  #344  
Old 08-19-2020, 06:21 PM
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Well, normally, if eating out-house, one does so in a restaurant - and there the customer is King... left vs right? Who cares, as long as the customer pays?

But an official banquet is tricky. Normally the man is seated left from the woman and if he helps her to sit down with her "complex" evening-gown, then she has to enter the chair logically from the right, since the man is standing left, manipulating the chair.

So, the Armed Forces... Mainly only men I assume and the women not in evening-gowns? No need to help... what could be an explanation...

Disclaimer: I am from Germany and have absolutely no idea about Commonwealth Armed Forces etiquette!
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  #345  
Old 08-19-2020, 06:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happysoul View Post
Can any one throw some light on seating etiquette at Banquets/State dinners. Downton Abbey table manners stipulate to enter and leave from the right of the chair. Hoever commonwealth defence forces which carry the British legacy of life style and dinning teach the soldiers and officers to enter from the left side of the chair and leave from the right. Armies in USA, Canada and India still follow this rule religiously. What I want to know is what’s the rule at the Buckingham Palace. I saw the Queen entering from the right of thr chair in dinner with Army in 1956 but from the left of the chair in recent state dinners. The guest on the two long tables on right and left of the table were doing it differently. The ones in left side were entering from the left of the chairs and the ones on the right table were entering from thr right side. I just wonder what’s the protocol guests have to follow.



I have no idea, but the videos below of the recent Spanish and Dutch state visits show how they did it.


https://youtu.be/OCk_pMBmHm0?t=114


https://youtu.be/Yilp9LKhfa0?t=413
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  #346  
Old 08-21-2020, 07:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happysoul View Post
Can any one throw some light on seating etiquette at Banquets/State dinners. Downton Abbey table manners stipulate to enter and leave from the right of the chair. Hoever commonwealth defence forces which carry the British legacy of life style and dinning teach the soldiers and officers to enter from the left side of the chair and leave from the right. Armies in USA, Canada and India still follow this rule religiously. What I want to know is what’s the rule at the Buckingham Palace. I saw the Queen entering from the right of thr chair in dinner with Army in 1956 but from the left of the chair in recent state dinners. The guest on the two long tables on right and left of the table were doing it differently. The ones in left side were entering from the left of the chairs and the ones on the right table were entering from thr right side. I just wonder what’s the protocol guests have to follow.
"usually" one enters from the right, but a banquette has its own rules as the space is sometimes rrrreally narrow plus it depends on the provided service.
as the table partner is on the left side the ladies enter from the right. goes back to some very old rules set concerning religious traditions, when the "right" /correct/good hand was the right, provided to make the cross.....
still done in monasteries everyhwere and later adapted from nobility.
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  #347  
Old 11-20-2020, 06:02 PM
Aristocracy
 
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I'm looking for some help with a question about seating plans. I know what the rules are for how to seat people at a dinner in a private residence, where the host and hostess take the chairs at each end.

I'm sure I read years ago that if the monarch is one of the guests, protocol says they should be seated at the head of the table, not in the guest of honour position to the right. I recall the explanation being that the monarch is deemed to be the 'owner' of all houses in the land, or something along those lines - I don't remember the precise wording.

I haven't been able to find backup for this anywhere online. Can anyone confirm if this is true? If and when the Queen attends a private dinner at someone's house, where would she be seated at the table? Where would the host then sit?

I hope I'm asking this in the right thread, and many thanks in advance for assistance!
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  #348  
Old 11-20-2020, 08:37 PM
Majesty
 
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The Queen would not be requested to host a dinner party at someone's private home when that person is in residence. She would be guest of honour and as such would be taken into the dining room by the host and seated on his right.

Debretts take on it.

https://www.debretts.com/expertise/e...nd-precedence/
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  #349  
Old 11-21-2020, 01:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sionevar View Post
I'm looking for some help with a question about seating plans. I know what the rules are for how to seat people at a dinner in a private residence, where the host and hostess take the chairs at each end.

I'm sure I read years ago that if the monarch is one of the guests, protocol says they should be seated at the head of the table, not in the guest of honour position to the right. I recall the explanation being that the monarch is deemed to be the 'owner' of all houses in the land, or something along those lines - I don't remember the precise wording.

I haven't been able to find backup for this anywhere online. Can anyone confirm if this is true? If and when the Queen attends a private dinner at someone's house, where would she be seated at the table? Where would the host then sit?

I hope I'm asking this in the right thread, and many thanks in advance for assistance!
We tend to follow a variation of the more traditonal seating plan, following something I read that the Queen follows for private dinners. The host sits, not at the head of the table, but in the middle, allowing the host to be best placed to have a conversation with as many guests as possible. This has worked well for us for many years.
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  #350  
Old 03-31-2021, 02:42 PM
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A little further reading regarding the French Court Etiquette

https://etiquipedia.blogspot.com/201...d-who-was.html
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  #351  
Old 04-01-2021, 05:31 AM
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Thank you for that interesting link!
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  #352  
Old 04-01-2021, 05:42 AM
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Very interesting. Thank you for the link!
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  #353  
Old 04-01-2021, 08:56 AM
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The French court must have been a nightmare for those non French Princesses who married into the French royal family and unaccustomed to the stringent etiquette Rules.
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  #354  
Old 05-28-2021, 06:09 AM
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I don’t know if I am appropriate to ask this question here, it’s about military salute.

I would like to ask, if like Prince William, he’s just a Squadron Leader in The RAF, he went to visit and inspect the RAF College Cranwell on behalf of The Queen, the one who welcomed him, like The Commandant, is an Air Commodore(outrank PW), would the Commandant, as Air Commodore, need to salute to PW, who’s lower rank than her?
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  #355  
Old 05-28-2021, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by EuroJpnJoRoyals View Post
I don’t know if I am appropriate to ask this question here, it’s about military salute.

I would like to ask, if like Prince William, he’s just a Squadron Leader in The RAF, he went to visit and inspect the RAF College Cranwell on behalf of The Queen, the one who welcomed him, like The Commandant, is an Air Commodore(higher ranks than PW), would the Commandant, as Air Commodore, need to salute to PW, who’s lower rank than her?
Great question. William does not only hold a rank based on his actual military career but also is honorary colonel since 2012; even though that is in a different branch of the Army (the Irish Guards) I do think it counts for all the armed forces, so he is higher rank. (Next to being the second highest man in the country in terms of precedence (at least in practice; formally he is fourth - after his father and uncles)).
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  #356  
Old 05-28-2021, 07:18 AM
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Great question. William does not only hold a rank based on his actual military career but also is honorary colonel since 2012; even though that is in a different branch of the Army (the Irish Guards) I do think it counts for all the armed forces, so he is higher rank. (Next to being the second highest man in the country in terms of precedence (at least in practice; formally he is fourth - after his father and uncles)).

True, he is fourth in the male order of precedence, but I think the official precedence is ignored most of the time. Williiam always walks and is seated ahead of his uncles in state dinners for example.
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  #357  
Old 05-28-2021, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Somebody View Post
Great question. William does not only hold a rank based on his actual military career but also is honorary colonel since 2012; even though that is in a different branch of the Army (the Irish Guards) I do think it counts for all the armed forces, so he is higher rank. (Next to being the second highest man in the country in terms of precedence (at least in practice; formally he is fourth - after his father and uncles)).
Yes I do aware of that. So those Armed Forces officers, no matter it’s Navy Air Forces or Army, who’s de facto out rank him(like a General)need to salute to William when they welcomed William?
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  #358  
Old 05-28-2021, 09:38 AM
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When William visits a military base (also in uniform) in an official capacity, he is the official representative of the Monarch and outranks everybody else.
And as such he is saluted - irrespective of his own rank.
And he is of course very high in the line of succession, that alone means he outranks everybody else but those within the BRF who have a higher rank. I.e. QEII herself and Prince Charles.
(In other monarchies, the wife to Prince Charles, Camilla, would outrank William as well. But that's not how it's done in the BRF.)

However, if William arrives at a base in a military function, then it's William who salutes his superiors.
That's William the officer and not William the royal.
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  #359  
Old 05-28-2021, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
When William visits a military base (also in uniform) in an official capacity, he is the official representative of the Monarch and outranks everybody else.
And as such he is saluted - irrespective of his own rank.
And he is of course very high in the line of succession, that alone means he outranks everybody else but those within the BRF who have a higher rank. I.e. QEII herself and Prince Charles.
(In other monarchies, the wife to Prince Charles, Camilla, would outrank William as well. But that's not how it's done in the BRF.)

However, if William arrives at a base in a military function, then it's William who salutes his superiors.
That's William the officer and not William the royal.
Thanks for that!
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  #360  
Old 08-29-2021, 07:02 AM
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I don't really understand the rules of use of the black mantilla, for women not very closed to the deceased. Pcs Caroline wore one, but queen Sofia didn't cover her head. I noticed that most of the ladies had not had covered (hat or mantilla) does anyone know the protocol for this.
I remember on late Prince Rainier funeral both his daughters were wearing long heavy mantillas covering also shoulders. But yesterday princess Tatiana was uncovered.

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