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  #21  
Old 09-02-2005, 04:40 AM
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Grand Princess Maria Wladimirovna of Russia News

From Interfax

Head of the Romanov House continues to seek rehabilitation of the last Russian Emperor

Moscow, September 1, Interfax - The head of the Russian Imperial house Maria Vladimirovna Romanova seeks official rehabilitation of the Imperial Family and other innocent victims of the family, irrespective of the difficulties on the way.

‘No matter how big the obstacles might be, the rehabilitation of the imperial martyrs it is necessary for modern Russia - the Russian state ought to renounce all the bloody crimes of the past and restore the succession in the centuries-long history of the Fatherland’, - Romanova said in the interview published by Rossiiskie Vesti weekly Thursday.

The great duchess finds it perplexing why the restoration of justice concerning all innocent martyrs proceeds with many difficulties. Such tardiness is often explained by that the martyrs do not need rehabilitation.

It goes without saying that martyrs do not need anything. They stand before God’ throne and pray for their people. Even canonization is more important for us, not for them, not to mention rehabilitation, she thinks.

For that not withstanding, Romanova is happy to get the finally issued official death certificates for the members the Imperial Family, as that has put an end to the disputes about people who claimed to be descendants of Tsar Nicholas II.
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Old 09-02-2005, 05:15 AM
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Thanks Idriel! I hope Grand Duchess Maria Wladimirovna will succeed in this task. Good to see that at least interfax recognises her as head of the imperial family


But on the other hand, should now ordinairy russians ask from her to apologise for all the terrible things the Romanov dynasty has done to Russians?

What is her son, Grand Duke George Michaelovitch doing these days btw?
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  #23  
Old 09-04-2005, 07:59 PM
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Maria is dreaming if she thinks the Russian government will ever consider restoring the imperial throne. They already have a new Tsar and his name is Vladimir Putin.

Maria's claim to the Romanov imperial headship is controversial. Under the Pauline Laws, she would technically be morganatic because her father, Grand Duke Vladimir, married Leondia Bagration, who was not from a "reigning sovereign house" as defined under the Imperial Statute. The Bagrations of Georgia were absorbed into the Russian Nobility and lost their sovereign status when Russia annexed Georgia into the Empire.

Vladimir insisted throughout his life that Leonida was a royal and the remaining dynasts had not married equally, therefore, he proclaimed his daughter, Maria, as curatrix of the throne due to the state of his family's marriages. But, he too was married morganatically and therefore, the dynasty died with his death, and there are no remaining eligible dynasts in the family line.

King Juan Carlos, as a matter of courtesy and recognition of the fact Maria has lived in Spain for many years, recognizes her as the head of the imperial house, but no other sovereigns in Europe do.
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Old 09-21-2005, 07:42 PM
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Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna

Hello All,

I thought I'd start a new topic on the Grand Duchess. Is there any news from her, any photographs etc?

Does anyone on this list dispute her claim?

I personally believe her to be the true heiress and she has worked so hard for Russia and it's people that she truly deserves to return in her rightful place.

I am sure Russia will one day restore it's monarchy. I think that Yugoslavia and Romania will do so too. Now the truth can be told, they will realise that their monarchs were badly treated.

What do we think?
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Old 09-21-2005, 11:47 PM
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This is a complicated situation. If you follow the true rules of the Russian succession, she is not the legitimate heir.

Her father did not marry a legitimate royal princess, something necessary for the succession. Her mother's princess status is quite ambiguous. Her mother is not considered a royal princess by the majority of Royals and therefore do not accept Maria as the legitimate heir.

The Russian succession also does not allow for female succession. It has not been agreed on by the Romanov family.
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Old 09-22-2005, 02:13 PM
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Sorry I don't like to contradict, but the family does allow female succession if there aren't any legitimate male heirs and the female is the closest surviving legitimate relative of that heir.

As for her rights, the marriage of her mother Leonida Georgievna Bagration-Moukhransky was considered by her opponents to be morganatic, and therefore against dynastic laws.

The royal status of the Bagration-Moukhranskys was questioned. The Bagration-Moukhransky were a minor branch of the Bagrationi dynasty which once ruled the nation of Georgia. They claimed to be the sole surviving branch of the Bagrationi family, a claim that turned out to be false(in the 1990's members of the family were found living in Georgia).

Pauline Law dictates that 'A person of the Imperial Family who has contracted marriage with a person of a status unequal to his, that is, not belonging to a Royal or Ruling House, cannot pass on to that person or to the posterity that might issue from such a marriage the rights that belong to members of the Imperial Family'.

There are two sides to the argument:
1 - Only the Emperor (by tradition) was allowed to decide if a marriage was in accordance with the succession laws or not.

Vladimir (Maria's father), who was the self-proclaimed Emperor at the time, had decided two years before his own marriage that the Bagrations were of "corresponding rank", in a letter to Prince Ferdinand of Spain regarding the latter's daughter's marriage to Prince Irakly Bagration

On the other hand, though it was approved by Vladimir, some say that the marriage is clearly morganatic (because of rank disparity between spouses) and cannot be considered otherwise by decision of anyone.
And, if that marriage, between a dynast and a subject noblewoman (a wife who is of high aristocratic birth, such as a princess, but a subject of the Empire and not of a sovereign family of reigning monarchs) is not morganatic, then marriages between other dynasts and subject noblewomen were not morganatic either, and therefore some Romanov princes are also dynasts - the male descent is thus not totally extinct (for example, if a Russian imperial dynast may equally marry a Princess Bagration-Moukhransky, then another dynasts obviously may, equality preserved, marry such personages as daughter of Duke Sasso-Ruffo, Princess Irina Paley who is descended from the same Romanov tsars, Princess Natalia Galitzina and Princess Alexandra Galitzina [descendants of medieval sovereigns of Lithuania and Belarussia, as high an ancestry as that of the Moukhran Bagrations, distant descendants of medieval sovereigns in Georgia], meaning that children born of such marriages of dynasts are as much heirs of Russia as Maria Vladimirovna. This would mean that no female is yet requisite to succession, and that apparently Michael Andreyevitsh Romanov, born 1920, is the present Head of imperial family).

There are also debates that her grandparents marriage was not approved of by the then Emperor, but the marriage was later approved by Emperor Nicholas II in 1907 and he gave her the style and title of 'Her Imperial Highness Grand Duchess Viktoria Feodorovna of Russia'.

There are many other debates, but I don't have the time to go into them now!
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Old 09-22-2005, 02:30 PM
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Re:

Layla has really pointed out all the major arguments of the case I feel. Well done Layla! It's the fact that the Tsar approved the marriage in 1907 that makes me believe that she is most definately the true heir to the Russian Throne.

Whether she takes her place on the Russian Throne is another matter entirely!
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Old 09-23-2005, 02:24 AM
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I'm sorry I didn't get to finish the post properly last time, but here is some more info for everyone.

Although I agree with you BeatrixFan about the Emperors approval of the marriage in 1907, I must also add that if the Emperor considered the marriage not to be morganatic, then can't it be said the other, equally morganatic or legal marriages (depending on how you see it), can be deemed legal according to dynastic laws?

Therefore all marriages between dynasts and subject noblewomen/men could produce children who would be allowed to take their place in the line of dynastic succession alongside (so to speak, because it is succession after all) children of dynast to dynast marriages.

Also in reference to my statement about more debates, opponents debate that Maria's grandfather, whose full title was 'HIH Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovitch', married a divorcée, whose former husband was HRH Grand Duke Ernest Ludwig of Hesse.
Maria's supporters counter by saying the laws governing the succession do not include laws forbidding marriages to divorcées.

And Grand Duke Cyril and Grand Duchess Viktoria were first cousins, and first cousins marrying was prohibited by the Russian Orthodox Church.
Maria's supporters point out that all her opponents derive their own claims from being descendants of Emperor Nicholas I whose wife was his second cousin, a relationship also forbidden by the Russian Orthodox Church.
If a church prohibition of consanguinity renders children of such a marriage ineligible to succeed, then none of today's claimants are eligible either, nor could Alexander II, Alexander III or Nicholas II ever have succeeded to the throne (and since they succeeded, their cases prove the prevalent application of dynastic law that a child of a prohibited marriage is not barred from succession.

None of the claimants say they have a better claim than Maria, they just say that she does not have a valid claim herself.

Maria's supporters also counter the consanguinity objection on the basis that the Emperor gave his approval to the marriage, and the Emperor was then the supreme head of the Russian Orthodox Church.
Again Maria's opponents counter saying that the Emperor was not able to change Church Law by his own decision. Instead, an act in ecclesiastical synods or councils would have been needed. However, the Orthodox Church does not condemn children of consanguineous marriages nor their rights to inheritance, so this argument is basically weak anyway.

Another argument is that at the time of their marriage, Grand Duchess Viktoria was a Protestant, not Orthodox..
Maria and her supporters counter that this objection is overcome by the Emperor's approval of the marriage. According to them, under dynastic law, the Emperor designated which of the dynasts had to marry Orthodox women; usually such requirement was placed on persons who were high on the succession line. At the time of his marriage, Grand Duke Cyril was not one of these people. There exists no prohibition of the Orthodox church for its members to marry Protestants. And later, Viktoria Fedorovna embraced the Orthodox faith, receiving a published accolade from the Emperor Nicholas II. At the time of Vladimir Cyrillovich's birth, his mother already had long been Orthodox.

My last post referred to female succession and I'll continue in more detail now, the opponents say that under the laws of the Russian Empire as they stood in 1917, no female could take the throne of Russia. This argument is not valid because Emperor Paul I of Russia established in the succession laws that upon extinction of male dynasts, females could succeed. While there are still a large number of males among Romanov descendants, Maria's supporters do not consider them to be dynasts.

Neither Maria Vladimirovna nor Nicholas Romanov nor any other prince Romanov pursues a position that can actually be solved in law, since the Headship of Imperial Russia is not a property or like which would be justiciable somewhere in functioning courts.
Unless for some reason the monarchy in Russia rises to power again, there will never be any real resolution to this quarrel.

Maria has openly stated that she considers herself the Curatrix to the Throne, as do many monarchists in Russia. Her father's claim as Tsar in Exile was very disputed by other members of his family. One said: "To say the family is divided is a euphemism. The family is raving mad." Maria hopes for the restoration of the monarchy someday, but polls have shown a very discouraging future for the Romanov family.

:) :)
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  #29  
Old 09-23-2005, 09:24 PM
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There is really no question that Maria's father, Grand Duke Vladimir, was the rightful Head of the Imperial House. The controversy is whether he made an equal marriage under the Pauline Laws when he married Leonida Bagration. Most royalists agree this marriage would not have been considered "equal" under the imperial rules because the Bagrations lost their sovereign status when Georgia was absorbed into the Russian Empire. They became part of the Russian Nobility, although the original treaty did call for the Head of the Bagration Dynasty to remain a Royal Highness and Prince of Georgia.

On the other hand, Grand Duke Vladimir was the Head of the Imperial House and de-facto Emperor. Since Russia was an absolute monarchy, it could be argued that Vladimir alone had the right to determine whether a marriage met the requirement of the Pauline Laws. The problem with this line of reasoning is "what's good for the goose, is good for the gander". If Vladimir ruled a marriage to a Bagration princess constituted an equal marriage, then many other male line of senior descent could also argue their marriages to other noble Russian families were equal as well. Given this dispensation, then there are more eligible dynasts who would be valid and come before Maria in the line of succession.

In my opinion, Grand Duke Vladimir was the last Romanov dynast and the family's claim died with him. Maria is the daughter of an honorable, but morganatic marriage, and does not meet the requirements of the Pauline Laws for succession. There are no eligible dynasts left in the family lines.
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  #30  
Old 09-24-2005, 12:15 AM
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Here are some pictures of Her Imperial Highness (or Her Imperial Majesty to some):
One of Maria- http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...pressmaria.PNG
Maria and George: http://www.peterkurth.com/ROMANOV%20...s/image032.jpg
And some more of Maria:
http://www.freewebs.com/royalwomen/MariaV.PNG
http://www.freewebs.com/royalwomen/MariaV2.PNG
http://www.freewebs.com/royalwomen/ad3.PNG
http://www.freewebs.com/royalwomen/untitled.PNG
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  #31  
Old 09-24-2005, 06:35 AM
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I think to determine who is the rightful head of the family and of the house, we need to examine the family tree.

Maria's father was Grand Duke Vladimir Cyrillovitch of Russia (although as we have discussed the legality of his marriage is in dispute), he was the only son of HIH Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovitch and HIH Grand Duchess Viktoria Feodorovna (formerly HRH Princess Victoria Melita of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha).

The Emperor Nicholas II disapproved of the marriage between Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovitch and Grand Duchess Viktoria Feodorovna because the two were first cousins and she was the divorced wife of HRH Grand Duke Ernst Ludwig of Hesse.
Upon his marriage Grand Duke Cyril was stripped of all of his imperial titles and removed from the line of succession, it was deemed that he had violated the Pauline Laws.
But after the deaths of many possible successors, the family put Cyril third in line to the throne and Emperor Nicholas II reinstated Cyril's royal titles and Cyril's wife was given the title and style of 'HIH Grand Duchess Viktoria Feodorovna'.

His paternal grandparents were Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovitch of Russia and Maria Pavlovna (formerly HH Duchess Marie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin).

The parents of Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovitch were Emperor Alexander II and his wife Maria Alexandrovna of Hesse (daughter of Ludwig II, Grand Duke of Hesse).
He was Emperor Alexander II's third, but second surviving son, his older brother was Emperor Alexander III and therefore he was the uncle of Alexander III' son and heir Tsar Nicholas II.

The imperial line is guaranteed on Maria's fathers side, but then we must get back to her parents marriage and it's legality.

We could argue that her parents marriage was legal and therefore she is an eligible heir, but what about the children and grandchildren of Tsar Nicholas II's siblings, it seem they have rights to succession too if they had marriages that would be in the same category as the marriage of Maria's grandparents.

I'll find more info on those marriages later and post it.
:) :)
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  #32  
Old 09-24-2005, 09:13 AM
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Maria's family

Nicholas II Russia (born: 18 May, 1868 – 17 July 1918)

Obviously because of the Russian revolition and the Bolshvik party murdering the Tsar and his family, the Tsar didn’t leave any heirs.


Nicholas II, Tsar of Russia



Grand Duke Alexander Alexandrovich (born: 7 June, 1869 – died: 2 May, 1870)
Alexander died of meningitis in 1870.
His parents had him posthumously potographed and sketched to remember him.
The picture below is the only picture taken of the infant Grand Duke and was taken after his death.


HIH Grand Duke Alexander Alexandrovich, the infant son of Tsar Alexander III, on his bier, in 1870.


Grand Duke George Alexandrovich (born: 6 May, 1871 – died: 9 August, 1899)
As an infant George was stronger and healthier than his brother Nicholas, however as he entered childhood he began to have health problems, including respiratory concerns.
In 1894, Alexander III died and Nicholas assumed the throne. At the time Nicholas had no children, thus the next in the line of succession was George, who became Tsarevich.
George's health continued to be a problem. His health made it impossible for him to return to St. Petersburg for the christenings of Nicholas' elder daughters, Olga and Tatiana. Shortly after the birth of Nicholas’ third daughter, Maria, in June 1899, George wrote to his brother that his only regret in life was that he had never met his nieces.

When George died it left his family devastated. Nicholas was especially grief-stricken at losing his younger brother and childhood playmate. George would always tell great jokes that would amuse his brother very much, and Nicholas would dutifully write out the jokes on pieces of paper and store them in a box.
Years later the Tsar could be heard laughing by himself in his room, looking through his old box of George’s jokes.
George’s title was passed to their younger brother Mikhail, but when Nicholas’ son, Alexei, was born he received the title of Tsarevich.


Grand Duke George Alexandrovitch as a young man in the early 1890s.
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Old 09-24-2005, 09:23 AM
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Maria's family continued

Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna (born: 6 April, 1875 – died: 20 April, 1960)
She was the daughter of Tsar Alexander III of Russia and Dagmar of Denmark (Maria Fyodorovna after her marriage) and sister of the last Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and, his brief uncrowned successor, their brother Mikhail.

Xenia Alexandrovna married Grand Duke Alexander Mikhailovich (a grandson of Nicholas I of Russia on 6 August, 1894 at Peterhof. Together they had seven children.


Grand Duke Mikhail of Russia (born: 22 November, 1878 – died: about 12 June, 1918)

On March 2, 1917 Emperor Nicholas II abdicated in favor of his brother, saying, “We bequeath Our in heritance to Our brother the Grand Duke Mikhail Alexandrovich and give him Our blessing on his accession to the throne.
One day later Mikhail signed a manifesto which stated in part, “I am firmly resolved to assume supreme power only if such is the will of our great people, who must now by universal suffrage and through their representatives in the Constituent Assembly establish a form of government and new fundamental laws of the Russian State”. For one day Mikhail entertained the idea of being elected by the people as ruler, but this was not to be.


Historians differ as to whether to view Mikhail as the last tsar. Some claim he became tsar the moment Nicholas’ abdication became effective, and Mikhail himself would have to abdicate in order to renounce the throne. His acceptance of the throne was subject to a condition that proved not to be met, and this is sometimes regarded as effectively an abdication. Thus, they claim, he technically reigned as tsar for a day. Others argue he could have become tsar only upon his full and unconditional acceptance of the throne, which never occurred.
The debate is of interest only to specialist historians because even if Mikhail was technically tsar:

# He only reigned for a maximum of one day.

# He never ruled.

# He was never crowned.

# He was never recognized by his people as ruler, and

# Nicholas II is universally recognized as the last effective tsar.



The best source material, archival from both Russia and elsewhere, seems to indicate that Mikhail was killed on the outskirts of Perm on June 12, 1918.
The order to execute him appears to have been given by the Perm Cheka.
Mikhail began a relationship withh Natalya Sergeyevna Sheremetevskaya, a twice-divorced commoner. Their only child, George, was born in 1910, and the couple married on October 29, 1912. She was not eligible to be known as Grand Duchess.
In 1928, Natalya and her son were created Countess Brasova and Count Brasov. Count Brasov died in a car crash at age 21 on July 22, 1931. On July 28, 1935, Countess Brasova was granted the title of HSH Princess Romanovskaya-Brasova by HIH Grand Duke Cyril of Russia, the pretender to the Russian throne.




Grand Duke Mikhail Alexandrovitch of Russia (1878-1918)



Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna of Russia (born: 13 June, 1882 – died:November 24, 1960)
Born in Alexandria Palace in Peterhof, Russia, she was the youngest daughter of Tsar Alexander III and his empress, Maria Fyodorovna, formerly Dagmar of Denmark.
At age 19 her marriage was arranged to Prince Peter of Oldenburg, but it ended in divorce.
During World War I, she worked as a medical nurse on the Russian front and in, November 1916, Olga married aptain Nikolai Kulikovsky with whom she had two sons, Tikhon and Guri.
Like her father, the Tsar, Olga preferred a quiet life to the grand baquets and lavish entertaining of the nobility. She played the violin for a hobby for most of her life. After the 1917 Revolution, stripped of most of their possessions, she and her husband fled Russia and lived in Denmark until 1948. They lived with Olga’s mother until she died in 1928. While there, in 1925, Olga traveled to Berlin, Germany to identify the woman claiming to be Anastasia, daughter of her brother, the Tsar Nikolai II. Olga, after changing her mind several times, eventually decided that the woman, Anna Anderson, was not her niece, saying, “she is not who she believes herself to be”.
Following World War II, Stalin’s propaganda machine declared that Grand Duchess Olga had conspired with Germany against Russia during the war. In 1948, with threats against her life, amidst the rising tensions of the Cold War, she and her husband left Denmark, moving to Canada.
When she was 65, she and her husband bought a rural property about 50 miles (80 kilometers) west of Toronto, Ontario. Although she lived with the horrific memories of her brother’s and his entire family’s murder, Olga never lived with any delusions of grandeur or dreams of a Romanov return to power. When her husband passed away in 1958, she moved to an apartment above a hairdressing salon in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
The funeral for the last Grand Duchess of Russia was attended by numerous Russian immigrants to Canada who arranged a dignified guard of honor.
Newspapers have described her death as the end of Imperial Russia.


I don't have any pictures of Xenia or Olga and if anyone could find pics, I'd really appreciate it!
:) :)
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  #34  
Old 09-24-2005, 11:47 AM
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Grand Duke Cyril's marriage to Victoria was deemed unacceptable for a time because the Empress Alexandra was furious at Princess Victoria for divorcing her brother, Grand Duke Ernst of Hesse, although her brother was relieved they could separate after the death of Queen Victoria. It had nothing to do with the Pauline Laws or being cousins. Given the opposition of the Empress, Tsar Nicholas II stripped Cyril of his rank and title and banished him from Russia. Later, he reversed his decision and granted Cyril and Victoria recognition and approved the marriage.

Maria's credentials are no worse, or better, than other honorable, but morganatic descendants of imperial dynasts. Her father was the rightful Head of the Imperial House after the death of Grand Duke Cyril, but because his marriage to Leonida was not equal, therefore, he could not transmit rights of succession to his only child, Maria. There are other more senior lines of male dynasts who come before Maria given the dispensation of Vladimir that a marriage to a Bagration noble female constituted an equal marriage under the Pauline Laws.
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Old 09-24-2005, 11:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeatrixFan
I am sure Russia will one day restore it's monarchy. I think that Yugoslavia and Romania will do so too. Now the truth can be told, they will realise that their monarchs were badly treated.

What do we think?
There is no momentum in Russia for a restoration of the imperial throne, which despite some romanticism among the people, had a long, troubled history of horrific rule and feudal control. The country is trying to move forward, not backwards, and I don't think there is sufficient depth of democracy yet to permit anything close to a constitutional monarchy.

Russia has no tradition of collaborative government or the rule of law, which is why there still remains a dictatorial presidency with police state powers. The elite is not interested in a monarchy and there is no reason to believe this will change anytime soon.
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Old 09-24-2005, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by branchg
Grand Duke Cyril's marriage to Victoria was deemed unacceptable for a time because the Empress Alexandra was furious at Princess Victoria for divorcing her brother, Grand Duke Ernst of Hesse, although her brother was relieved they could separate after the death of Queen Victoria. It had nothing to do with the Pauline Laws or being cousins. Given the opposition of the Empress, Tsar Nicholas II stripped Cyril of his rank and title and banished him from Russia. Later, he reversed his decision and granted Cyril and Victoria recognition and approved the marriage.

Maria's credentials are no worse, or better, than other honorable, but morganatic descendants of imperial dynasts. Her father was the rightful Head of the Imperial House after the death of Grand Duke Cyril, but because his marriage to Leonida was not equal, therefore, he could not transmit rights of succession to his only child, Maria. There are other more senior lines of male dynasts who come before Maria given the dispensation of Vladimir that a marriage to a Bagration noble female constituted an equal marriage under the Pauline Laws.
Oh, thanks for correcting me, I wasn't sure about the reasons behind the rift.

And I do agree that Maria's credentials are equal, but given that most of the possible successors are products of morganatic marriages (including Maria), the family must have only those morganatic heirs to choose from when deciding on an heir apparent.

And a question, if Maria's parents marriage was really morganatic, who are the children from legal marriages, that would qualify ahead of Maria?

And why did the Tsar reverse his decision, after all he was still married to Alexandra and she didn't seem like she would change her mind after feeling so strongly about the matter in the first place.
If he was influenced by his wife in making his decision, then did she change her mind about her former sister-in-law?

Also, I'm confused by something you said, "although her brother was relieved they could separate after the death of Queen Victoria", are you talking about Alexandra's brother? And if so, what's that matter about?
Thanks for whatever info you can provide.:) :)
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  #37  
Old 09-24-2005, 01:34 PM
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If Maria's father married a morganaut, Princess Bagration, making her morganatic, then the senior morganaut representative would Michael Andrejevitch Romanov, great-great grandson of Tsar Nicholas I, as Head of the Romanov Family, but disqualified from the imperial succession under the Pauline Laws.

If we look back further to Grand Duke Cyril, his daughter, Grand Duchess Kira, made an equal and most compliant marriage under the Imperial Statute to Prince Louis-Ferdinand von Hohenzollern. This would mean her great-grandson, Prince Georg-Freidrich von Hohenzollern, the Head of the Prussian Royal House, is the heir to the Romanov Imperial House as well, with the death of Grand Duke Vladimir.

You could argue even further that if the monarchy was restored in Russia, very unlikely in my opinion, but not impossible, the Government could grant the throne to any number of Romanov descendants, including HRH Prince Michael of Kent, as the new Tsar.
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Old 09-24-2005, 01:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Layla1971
Also, I'm confused by something you said, "although her brother was relieved they could separate after the death of Queen Victoria", are you talking about Alexandra's brother? And if so, what's that matter about?
Thanks for whatever info you can provide.
It is thought that Grand Duke Ernst Ludwig of Hesse and by Rhine was gay. The reasons for the divorce were never discussed, as far as I know, by either of the parties involved.
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Old 09-24-2005, 01:38 PM
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Regarding Ernst's marriage to Victoria, they were very unhappy from the start, since Ernst is generally regarded as having been gay and Victoria was basically forced to marry him because her grandmother, Queen Victoria, wanted her to. After the Queen died, the couple went their separate ways and eventually divorced when Grand Duke Cyril asked Victoria to marry him.
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Old 09-25-2005, 07:34 AM
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Thanks branchg and Warren, I didn't know exactly what caused Grand Duke Cyril to be stripped of his titles, I just assumed it was because the marriage was considered morganatic.

You both seem to know alot more about this subject than me.
I should have researched it more before I posted, sorry for being incorrect, I'll try to be more accurate from now on. :)
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