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  #61  
Old 04-16-2013, 06:07 AM
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I see. It's fashion. We have the same tendency now.
The problem is that you must know how to pronounce name (for example, English Charles or French Charles).
So people read and pronounce names as they want.
Courau is good example
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  #62  
Old 04-24-2013, 12:32 PM
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Location: a town near the Adriatic coast, Italy
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In Italy we have quite the same trend as in Spain; translated name for some royals and non translated names for others.
Some examples:
I've always known Queen Elizabeth as Regina Elisabetta, and all the BRF so: Charles-Carlo, Andrew-Andrea, ect. the only names left out from the translation were William (it would be Guglielmo) and Harry. Now media use Kate for the Duchess of Cambridge.
They never translated the names of the Spanish Royal Family, but they did with the others (when it was possible). I don't know why they had and still have different use of the names...
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  #63  
Old 12-22-2014, 12:13 AM
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All names with an English equivalent should be translated. All diacritics from names should be removed.

Spanish Juan Pedro López should be called John Peter Lopez in English, regardless of what he wants, same with German Heinrich Friedrich Nonnenmacher (Henry Frederick Nunemaker) and Dutch Johan Hendrik Krankheyt (John Frederick Cronkite)

For the same reason I am Robertus Devinius Martnenius in Latin and Roberto Devin Martnen in Spanish. (My full name is Robert Devin Martnen)
In Spanish, my middle name would be pronounced day-VEEN, even though I pronounce it DEV-in.

It just looks and sounds better to use English versions of names in English. The same rule applies to all languages.

More Examples
French: Pierre Jean Gagné -> Peter John Gonyea
Irish: Damháin Pádraig Caomhánach -> Devin Patrick Cavanaugh
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  #64  
Old 12-22-2014, 12:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Martnen View Post
All names with an English equivalent should be translated. All diacritics from names should be removed.

Spanish Juan Pedro López should be called John Peter Lopez in English, regardless of what he wants, same with German Heinrich Friedrich Nonnenmacher (Henry Frederick Nunemaker) and Dutch Johan Hendrik Krankheyt (John Frederick Cronkite)

For the same reason I am Robertus Devinius Martnenius in Latin and Roberto Devin Martnen in Spanish. (My full name is Robert Devin Martnen)
In Spanish, my middle name would be pronounced day-VEEN, even though I pronounce it DEV-in.

It just looks and sounds better to use English versions of names in English. The same rule applies to all languages.

More Examples
French: Pierre Jean Gagné -> Peter John Gonyea
Irish: Damháin Pádraig Caomhánach -> Devin Patrick Cavanaugh


How about little Eleanor of all the Saints of Bourbon? Now that's something you don't hear every day.
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  #65  
Old 12-22-2014, 05:49 AM
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I tend to not anglicise personal names as, in many cases, I don't see the point. Besides, context usually helps clear up any uncertainties. King John Charles sounds artificial and pedantic to my way of thinking. But, to be contrary, I much prefer Pope Francis to Pope Franciscus. In general, there are too many variables to make mandatory anglicisation workable. What is an "English equivalent", and when does a "foreign" name become an English name in its own right? Should Princess Blanche of France really be called Blank, White or Pure? It also seems a bit random that the King of Sweden has to make do with Charles XVI Gustavus while the King of Thailand gets to keep Bhumibol Adulyadej. What about King Norodom Sihamoni of Cambodia? Sihamoni is a combination of his parents' names; Sihanouk and Monineath, but Monineath is the Cambodian transliteration of Monique. Should the King be called Sihamonica instead?

To take anglicisation to its logical conclusion I think it would be necessary to translate a name when there is no "English equivalent". That means the late Emperor Showa of Japan should be called Emperor Enlightened Peace. The Grand Dowager Empress Cixi of the Great Qin Empire should be Grand Dowager Empress Kindly and Virtuous of China. But what would be the point?

When it comes to titles, however, I prefer the English equivalent. So i would go for Emperor Karl of Austria instead of Emperor Charles or Kaiser Karl. I dislike seeing Russian rulers called Tsar in English as the correct title, since 1721 was Император, Emperor (but to be contrary again, I would call the last Emperor Nicholas II rather than Nikolai II). If we use Kaiser in English perhaps we should also use Tenno and Huángdì for the Emperors of Japan and China, or should it be Heavenly Sovereign for both?

In general,I just try to be consistent with my inconsistencies, add some context when in doubt, and hope for the best.
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  #66  
Old 12-22-2014, 06:34 AM
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In the past when there was relatively little communication between "the common public" in countries, foreign names would be translated to the local version.
In the Netherlands (where i come from) that meant we knew people as
Karel de Grote (Charlemagne)
Lodewijk XIV (Louis, the sun-king)
Karel II (Charles II)
these historical figures are still known here by their dutch names

Nowadays i find it mainly confusing when foreign names are "dutchicised", like the current Kings of Spain and Belgium; they would both be Filip.
For me it would make more sense to use the name they use themselves especially on an international forum like this. So the dutch king will be "Willem-Alexander" and not William-Alexander, and Camilla's husband is Charles and not Karel
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  #67  
Old 12-22-2014, 06:42 AM
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In the 1960's the husband of Princess Irene was still "Dutch-ized" into Prins Karel-Hugo van Bourbon-Parma. His children however, all got Spanish names: Carlos, Margarita, Jaime and Carolina. These were not translated into Karel, Margriet, Jakob and Karlijn. Somewhere in the 1960's the Dutch media ended the translation of names. When the Bourbon-Parmas were incorporated into Luxembourgian and Dutch nobility, the French surname was used in both countries: de Bourbon de Parme. This was analogue with the style which was used by -for an example- Empress Zita: before her marriage she signed as Zita de Bourbon, Princesse de Parme.
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  #68  
Old 12-22-2014, 08:58 AM
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I don't know if this one suits the thread, anyway I strongly disagree that the original names should turned into a foreign form... I get very irritated, for example, every time I see that "Henri" of Denmark was changed into "Henrik"... Personally, I would refuse to change my name because to me it is like reject my identity...
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