Centenary of the Russian Revolution


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Marengo

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This year it will be 100 years ago that a revolution got rid of Russia's imperial family.

There will be several articles, exhibitions etc. to mark this event. In this thread you can post about them.

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https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/17/russia-1917-revolutions-legacy-lenin-putin

Tragedy or triumph? Russians agonise over how to mark 1917 revolutions

The February uprising sparked a brief period of democratic rule before the Bolsheviks seized power – and the legacy of 1917 still divides the country.

[...]

The year featured two revolutions: the February revolution (actually in March, according to the modern calendar) deposed Tsar Nicholas II after more than 300 years of rule by the Romanov dynasty, ushering in a brief period in which hopes for a democratic future flourished. Lenin’s Bolsheviks, a small, marginal faction of fanatics who were not taken seriously in the aftermath of the February uprising, took control in the October revolution (actually in November).


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The Hermitage in Amsterdam has an exhibition about the fall of the Romanovs that will be opened from Februrary 4th until September 17th.

"Hermitage Amsterdam has obtained rare permission to show dozens of intimate historical documents from the Russian State Archive in Moscow during its forthcoming exhibition 1917. Romanovs & Revolution. This is in addition to over 200 objects from the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg. The materials from the State Archive include letters from the mysterious and disreputable court faith healer Rasputin, as well as family holiday snaps, love letters, the last diaries of Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra, childhood drawings by the tsarevich and his sisters. Also on show are Nicholas’ Act of Abdication (facsimile), and one of the bayonets used to murder the captive imperial family in July 1918.


In their own words

The State Archive and State Hermitage Museum hold massive collections of historical documents, personal belongings and letters connected with the last Romanovs. They provide moving insights into the minds of the key players. Many documents tell the story literally in their own words. On the day before the murder, for example, Tsarina Alexandra writes in her diary: ‘11 o’clock. Grey morning, later lovely sunshine. […] All went out for half an hour, but Olga and I arranged our jewels’ (ed: in order to hide or sew them in clothes). Or faith healer Rasputin in a message to the tsar: ‘Do not lose heart in times of tribulation, the Lord will appear to exalt you.’ The many photographs and film fragments provide a veritable pictorial history of the time. Photographs taken by the Romanovs themselves give insights into their private family life while original black-and-white pictures by Karl Bulla – a celebrated pioneer photographer of city life comparable to his contemporary Jacob Olie in the Netherlands – show St Petersburg around the turn of the century.
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https://www.hermitage.nl/en/pers/algemeen/persberichten/161222-intimate_historical_documents_and_murder_%20weapon_last_romanovs.htm
 
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Stanford exhibition marked the centenary of the Russian Revolution
 
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