Royal, Princely and Noble Families of Germany & Austria 3: 2023 -


If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.
Stephanie Countess Bruges-von Pfuel attended the "Mon Cheri Hosts Barbara Tag" in Munich yesterday, December 4:


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Prince Cristian Steinfurt Bentheim's funeral will be held on 28th, Dec.
Due to preparations and giving everybody the chance to celebrate christmas.
 
Prince Cristian Steinfurt Bentheim's funeral will be held on 28th, Dec.
Due to preparations and giving everybody the chance to celebrate christmas.

I didn't realize he'd died - missed that news completely. :sad:
 
Tamara Countess of Nayhauß attended the Red Night By Campari & Bunte on the occasion of the 74th Berlinale International Film Festival Berlin:


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Tamara Countess of Nayhauß attended the 19th Felix Burda Award in Berlin this evening, April 21:


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Tita of Hardenberg at the opening of the Ruinart Maison 1729 Pop-up at Tacheles in Berlin yesterday, April 24:


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Anja Countess of Keyserlingk attended the premiere of the musical "Ein bißchen Frieden" in Munich yesterday, May 9:


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Stephanie Countess Bruges-von Pfuel and Tamara Countess of Nayhauß attended the Green Awards at Greentech Festival 2024 in Berlin yesterday, May 15:


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Is there any news about the engagement of Waldburg-Zeil/Neipperg? Maybe a wedding date?
 
Anja Countess of Keyserlingk and Konstantin Count of Keyerslingk celebrated their free wedding in South Tirol, Italy, two years after their civil wedding:


 
Is he related to Eduard Graf von Keyserling who was a famous writer who lived in Litauen and studied in Tartu, Estonia? He later moved to Munich and died there. I wonder because of the similarity of the names.
 
Anja Countess of Keyserlingk and Konstantin Count of Keyerslingk celebrated their free wedding in South Tirol, Italy, two years after their civil wedding:


What is a 'free wedding'? It's the first time I heard that term. Is it an alternative to a church wedding for non-religious people? Like the non-firmation apparently is a thing in Scandinavia for those who don't want to be confirmed but still want the party that comes with it?
 
Tamara Countess of Nayhauß attended the 19th Felix Burda Award in Berlin this evening, April 21:


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I had to look up that name because I've never seen that family name or that letter at the end that resembles the capital letter B, but in a twisted shape.

Nayhauß (Adelsgeschlecht) – Wikipedia - translate to English if the page shows in German

and Category:Nayhauß family Category:Nayhauß family – Wikimedia Commons

But I still couldn't find why that last letter is with a font I've never seen before: Nayhauß
Anyone knows?
 
I had to look up that name because I've never seen that family name or that letter at the end that resembles the capital letter B, but in a twisted shape.

Nayhauß (Adelsgeschlecht) – Wikipedia - translate to English if the page shows in German

and Category:Nayhauß family Category:Nayhauß family – Wikimedia Commons

But I still couldn't find why that last letter is with a font I've never seen before: Nayhauß
Anyone knows?
It's a special German letter: originally a 'sz' - but you can think of it as 'ss' for pronunciation.

Scroll down for the explanation on this very special letter in the German alphabet: The German Alphabet - a Complete Guide
 
What is a 'free wedding'? It's the first time I heard that term. Is it an alternative to a church wedding for non-religious people? Like the non-firmation apparently is a thing in Scandinavia for those who don't want to be confirmed but still want the party that comes with it?
Exactly, it's a non-religious wedding ceremony without a priest, no prayers and the like, but also a "free speaker" who leads the ceremony. You can have a free wedding even if you have been confirmed, it's a matter of choice.


And Toledo, Somebody's explanation is correct. And as I have a German keyboard, I can type the "ß" like it is used in the Nayhauß family's name.
 
It's a special German letter: originally a 'sz' - but you can think of it as 'ss' for pronunciation.

Scroll down for the explanation on this very special letter in the German alphabet: The German Alphabet - a Complete Guide
I just bookmarked that page!

@Somebody Thanks for the explanation, I was not familiar with the shape of that font at all. So out of curiosity I opened a blank word document and found the letter is available in our computers as a symbol under:

Word ---> Task bar on the top ---> select Insert ----> to the extreme right click on Symbols and the font "ß" is located under the Subset menu called Modifier Tone Letters.

In that Word/Symbols/Subset the location within that box is on the left side but you have to scroll down almost to the end to grab it for use.

Well, we just proved that The Royal Forums is now just articles but an entire learning experience!
:graduate:
 
Franziska of Hardenberg attended the Fashion Raceday at trotting course Hoppegarten Dahlwitz-Hoppegarten, Germany on June 9:


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Stephanie Countess Bruges-von Pfuel, Anja Countess of Keyserlingk and Konstantin Count of Keyerslingk attended the opening of „House of Banksy – An Unauthorized Exhibition" in Munich, Germany yesterday, June 13:


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