Possible Dukedom for Harry and Meghan


If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

What Dukedom will Prince Harry receive upon marriage?

  • Duke of Clarence

    Votes: 63 25.7%
  • Duke of Sussex

    Votes: 112 45.7%
  • Duke of Kendal

    Votes: 8 3.3%
  • Duke of Ross

    Votes: 8 3.3%
  • Duke of Hereford

    Votes: 6 2.4%
  • Duke of Windsor

    Votes: 13 5.3%
  • Duke of Buckingham

    Votes: 8 3.3%
  • Something 'New' (Please specify)

    Votes: 8 3.3%
  • An Earldom (Please specify)

    Votes: 4 1.6%
  • Nothing - he and Meghan will remain Prince and Princess Henry of Wales

    Votes: 9 3.7%
  • Other (Please specify)

    Votes: 6 2.4%

  • Total voters
    245
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Excellent points. For clarification, by new I meant a new creation. Yes, they have been used before but I believe Cumberland is extinct and I now concede that Connaught is not an option, because it is an Irish title and not U.K. as you pointed out. Thank you. Eitherway, they are both very unlikely choices which supports my initial prediction of Clarence or Sussex.
 

A lot of the titles you have listed have current holders either as the title stated, as a subsidiary of another title, or in some other degree within the peerage.

Northhampton former Earldom
Now a Marquisate with current holder and three generations of heirs - last one born in 2010

Rutland, former Dukedom and Earldom
I think the present Duke of Rutland might object. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Manners,_11th_Duke_of_Rutland

Leicester, former Earldom
Current Earl might object - particularly as his heir apparent is only 14

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Leicester#Seventh_creation_(1837)

Warwick, former Dukedom and Earldom
Nothing 'former' about it. The current Earl is very much alive and has an heir who is the same age as Prince William.

Stafford, former Earldom.
Current Baron Stafford might not be happy with that idea

Highly unlikely they would create a Dukedom of Cheshire when his father is the Earl of Chester and, in time, his brother will probably be created Earl of Chester - it is usually given with the Prince of Wales title.

Derby, former Earldom.
Current Earldom with a heir apparent as well. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Stanley,_19th_Earl_of_Derby

Nottingham, former Earldom.
Current Earldom held as a subsidiary title by the Earl of Winchelsea - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Stanley,_19th_Earl_of_Derby

Lincoln, former Earldom.
Again the current Earl might not like having someone take his title.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Lincoln#Earls_of_Lincoln,_Eighth_Creation_(1572)

Now remember, we are looking for a “traditional” royal ducal title. We can eliminate some of these immediately because they are dukedoms currently in use (i.e., Gloucester), or never been associated with a title (i.e., Shropshire or Cheshire), or they are titles generally granted to non-royals, which is almost everything else. None of the other names on the list jump out to me as traditional enough. Not that something brand new couldn’t be granted to Prince Harry, but I just don’t think there is a strong likelihood which is why Clarence and Sussex should still top all of our lists. If it is something new, it will likely be a geographic name outside of the former Kingdom of Mercia and have royal connections i.e. Cumberland or Connaught, neither of which sound very exciting.

Cumberland is out - there are a number of living potential claimants - namely the Hanovers. The current claimant is Prince Ernst August husband of Princess Caroline of Monaco and he has two sons one of whom married earlier this year.

Connaught is out because the place itself is in the Republic of Ireland and it would not be acceptable in this day and age to create a title associated with a foreign country.
 
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Excellent points. For clarification, by new I meant a new creation. Yes, they have been used before but I believe Cumberland is extinct and I now concede that Connaught is not an option, because it is an Irish title and not U.K. as you pointed out. Thank you. Eitherway, they are both very unlikely choices which supports my initial prediction of Clarence or Sussex.

Cumberland, like Albany, is not extinct. Teviotdale also created with Cumberland is also unavailable

They are both 'in abeyance' due to the Titles Deprivations Act but there are existing heirs who can apply to have the titles reinstated. There are about half a dozen heirs and with one marrying this past summer that number could easily grow.

The current claimant for Cumberland would be Prince Ernst of Hanover while for Albany it would be Prince Hubertus with about a dozen heirs after him. Included in that list are some of Prince Philip's sister's descendants as she married a younger brother and had sons by her second marriage all of whom could claim the Cumberland title at some point in the future if they ever became the head of the house.
 
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All excellent points above. That just furthers the point that a title from the former Heptarchy Kingdom of Mercia is not likely and that the choices between one from the "original list of 5" (Clarence) or the former Kingdom of Sussex are clearly the top 2 options to be considered. I think we have this narrowed down fairly well.
 
I like both Clarence and Sussex, but Duke and Duchess Sussex is a bit of a tongue-twister.
 
Duke and Duchess Sussex is a bit of a tongue-twister.

There is an 'of' in the middle [to make it easier for you]...
 
That really never occurred to me as I guess I'm pretty used to the Countess of Wessex by now. :D

I am still leaning towards Sussex as it is just more pleasing to my ear than Clarence. For some odd reason, I still connect Clarence with Clown. I'm odd that way.
 
Some would (and do) argue that Clarence should not be chosen due to some of the negative character associations connected to this title.However, we have recently learned that Prince Harry and Meghan Markel share common royal ancestry, both descending from Lionel of Antwerp, the 1st Duke of Clarence, the second son of King Edward III (according to American Ancestors by the New England Historic & Genealogical Association).

I hadn't realized this. If true, it's a game changer for me and makes Clarence seem like the most likely choice.
 
wOw. Yeps. That's a serious game changer here too. It has a personal connection to the couple even though its quite a remote connection. It would give more of a personal story behind the dukedom and also make for a really, really neat story to tell the kids and grandkids when they're growing up. Adds a bit of flavor to the couple's being drawn to each other by fate that perhaps took centuries.

Brings out the storyteller in me, I guess. ?
 
I always look forward with anticipation when they break-in during the coverage for an announcement. It’s exciting, I enjoy the build up to it.
 
That really never occurred to me as I guess I'm pretty used to the Countess of Wessex by now. :D

I am still leaning towards Sussex as it is just more pleasing to my ear than Clarence. For some odd reason, I still connect Clarence with Clown. I'm odd that way.

I think it's the extra s in Sussex that just drives me bananas when I try to say it. :lol:
 
Its really weird that the double s never really occurred to me. Severely hearing impaired since birth, I've also had a problem with speech and even after years and years of speech classes, the letter S in speech still gives me the heebeejeebees. Guess it didn't really matter much though. I married a Stephen. Go figure. :lol:

Now, after all due consideration, Either the Duke of Sussex or the Duke of Clarence will be very pleasing to me. I love these discussions and every now and then, even changing my opinion. :D
 
the extra s in Sussex that just drives me bananas when I try to say it.

That 'extra s' is silent ! It is pronounced Sus-ix... *simples* !
 
:previous: Just one S is enough to give me the heebeejeebees. I like the title though as long as I just have to type it. :lol:
 
If they have a common ancestor named Clarence, then Duke and Duchess of Clarence would make sense. Plus, easier to pronounce than "Duke and Duchess of Sussex," an added bonus.
 
And there is this too:

When evaluating the original list of 5 from above, all are in use by a member of the current House of Windsor, except Clarence which is vacant.When evaluating the list from the Heptarchy, most are in use.Kent and Wessex by the House of Windsor, Northumria by the House of Percy, Essex by the House of Capell, East Anglia and its geographic subdivisions are held by the Houses of Howard or Windsor.Mercia could be argued that there are geographic opportunities and finally Sussex which is vacant.


Info copied from page 18/19



LaRae
 
Isn't the additional S what keeps it from using the long U sound?
 
I really can't see what all the fuss is about 'Sussex'?! I do love a bit of innuendo, but I don't this being an issue to most people, even to some of the British tabloids - after all, they manage Middlesex without too much trouble.....
 
If Prince Harry is given the title of Duke of Clarence, what would be his secondary titles?
 
If Prince Harry is given the title of Duke of Clarence, what would be his secondary titles?

I am interested in reading additional input on this subject but, this will be much more difficult to predict. We can anticipate, generally, that he will be granted a Scottish Earldom and an Irish Barony.
 
I still think Windsor would be an image clean route.
 
:previous: What do you mean? Cleaning the image of the Windsor title? By giving Meghan the worst possible title?
 
I am interested in reading additional input on this subject but, this will be much more difficult to predict. We can anticipate, generally, that he will be granted a Scottish Earldom and an Irish Barony.

Would the Scottish Earldom and the Irish Barony be brand new creations? Or would they be taken from titles that have not been used in years?
 
In William’s case, his Scottish Earldom has roots as far back as the 12th century. His Northern Irish title was a brand new creation.

Correction: Carrickfergus had in fact been linked to a barony in the 1840s when Queen Victoria created the Marquess of Donegall ‘Baron Ennishowen and Carrickfergus.
 
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I couldn't specify when I voted but I think Duke of Connaught
 
I couldn't specify when I voted but I think Duke of Connaught

That one isn't in the running as Connaught is one of the provinces in the Republic of Ireland-a foreign country. Northern Ireland is part of the United Kingdom.
 
I couldn't specify when I voted but I think Duke of Connaught

Connaught is a non-starter as the place 'Connaught' is in the Republic of Ireland. It would be like giving him Washington as a title.

Any substantive Irish titles that haven't gone extinct are still in use but if and when they go extinct, as has happened with Connaught, the title won't be used again.
 
The discussion about Meghan's name has been moved to the Family and Background thread. The discussion about titles has been moves to the 'Questions about British Styles and Titles' thread.
 
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