King Mohammed VI Current Events 4: April 2017-


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Does King Mohammed attend 32nd Arab League Summit in Jeddah today?
 
Concerning studies about the longlasting non-guidance by the King.
I can confirm that the people are unhappy for a long time by the corrupt system of the gov&monarchy, though many don't dare to talk openly in public, in private they do.

Let's hope someone steps in and takes over. The current King was never a good "choice".

https://csis-website-prod.s3.amazon...df?VersionId=X8C5xhgYzcbaqBKgSn2ko6uUABa3mbYs
Maybe there will be a regency I.e- the King’s brother could step in.
 
Maybe there will be a regency I.e- the King’s brother could step in.

Well, the King at least recently shown more activity than during the years before as mentioned in the study, he did appear for pilgrimage and feast days...
but if he realized it or is manipulated by the "gangsta-brothers" who don't want to loose power-we don't know. And it's not enough of course, the land urges for direction.

If Maroc happened to destabilize would be a tragedy for the region and very dangerous aswell.
With Algeria and its aggressions right in the neighbourhood and the west sahara,
and the russian aggressor trying to spread his influence in Africa step by step....
not good at all.
But how to "get rid of" a king?
Let's hope the best for the people. I feel a bit sorry for the King as well, he seemed to be happy in the beginning of his marriage and all could have turned out positively, he once was known as a kind of reformer and could have been a modernizer, Maroc is such a lovely country, but then things went terribly wrong, there we are.

Nice day.
 
Well, the King at least recently shown more activity than during the years before as mentioned in the study, he did appear for pilgrimage and feast days...
but if he realized it or is manipulated by the "gangsta-brothers" who don't want to loose power-we don't know. And it's not enough of course, the land urges for direction.

If Maroc happened to destabilize would be a tragedy for the region and very dangerous aswell.
With Algeria and its aggressions right in the neighbourhood and the west sahara,
and the russian aggressor trying to spread his influence in Africa step by step....
not good at all.
But how to "get rid of" a king?
Let's hope the best for the people. I feel a bit sorry for the King as well, he seemed to be happy in the beginning of his marriage and all could have turned out positively, he once was known as a kind of reformer and could have been a modernizer, Maroc is such a lovely country, but then things went terribly wrong, there we are.

Nice day.
I don’t agree with the King still associating himself with these brothers regardless of them being “underdogs”. I think he enjoys their company and is unwilling to stay way from them. I don’t agree with the official who says that they should accept the King wanting to be friends with the brothers. They disrespect the officials, the family members and some of public by jumping queues at a hospital is not appropriate. I get that the King still probably hasn’t come to terms with the “harsh” treatment from his father, but he cannot confuse that with the circumstances of the boxing brothers. He’s going to cause problems for his heir if he doesn’t change things.
 
Why brother?

Moulay Hassan is of age already.

True, his hiba or what one wants to see it like seems perfect for the political void his father creates.
Military training still missing, but now at best age to start.

Let's hope his character and talents are what people hope for and " see" in him.
 
Concerning studies about the longlasting non-guidance by the King.
I can confirm that the people are unhappy for a long time by the corrupt system of the gov&monarchy, though many don't dare to talk openly in public, in private they do.

Let's hope someone steps in and takes over. The current King was never a good "choice".

https://csis-website-prod.s3.amazon...df?VersionId=X8C5xhgYzcbaqBKgSn2ko6uUABa3mbYs


Thank you very much for posting this interview with Nicholas Pelham. It, and his feature story about King Mohammed VI (https://www.economist.com/1843/2023/04/14/the-mystery-of-moroccos-missing-king), put into perspective all the foreign news stories about the King's jaunts abroad and the controversy over his closeness to the Azaitar brothers, which are difficult to understand without context.

It is a very balanced piece towards all concerned, even the Azaitars. It left me feeling both deeply sympathetic to Moroccans for the damage that the King's abandonment of the monarchy's irreplaceable role and his flagrant nepotism is doing to their livelihoods and security, and sympathetic to the King for the abusive and oppressive upbringing which made him seek shelter in foreign countries and friendships. It doesn't mince words about the security services' brutality and stamping out of dissent (for which the king also bears responsibility), but also points out their role in stabilizing the country, especially when the king is not up to the job.

This quote from the interview seems important:

Nicholas Pelham: "For reasons I don't really understand, the Spanish press, Ignacio Cembrero particularly, reported on this [Moroccan press reports about the Azaitars], but there was next to no follow up. We started writing about it, and the more we delved into it the more there was to report. We became quite concerned because it hadn't surfaced in the English or French language press, and we worried about the consequences of publication. The editorial process was particularly rigorous. Every line in that article has multiple sources and was checked and re-checked."
 
Presentation to King Mohammed VI of a model of the first Moroccan consumer car brand and of the prototype of a hydrogen vehicle of Moroccan initiative.


https://www.mapexpress.ma/actualite...ype-vehicule-hydrogene-dinitiative-marocaine/

Nice! I'm happy Morocco is entering the new and competitive industry of a fossil fuels free car industry. But when I saw that letter X on the logos my first thought was if Elon is hiding on that trunk driving it! :lol: He already ruined my Twitter account with that letter and, unless is in an MCU X-Men movie, I don't want to see an X logo in the near future on anything else. :ermm:

Excerpt:
"The presentation to HM the King of the car of "Neo Motors", a company owned by Moroccan capital, and the prototype of a hydrogen vehicle of the company NamX, named HUV (Hydrogen Utility Vehicle), underlines the Sovereign's willingness to encourage and promote pioneering national entrepreneurial initiatives and creative abilities, especially of Moroccan youth, that these projects embody.

...particularly in the cutting-edge and future-oriented sectors and stimulating the emergence of a new generation of companies in the Kingdom.

They also confirm HM the King's far-sighted vision for sustainable development and the promotion of renewable energies, particularly the emerging green hydrogen sector
.
 
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This passage from Nicholas Pelham's article is interesting because it employs the popular arguments in favor of hereditary monarchy that are used by monarchists all over the world: that the monarch can mediate between political factions, that the dynasty's longetivity gives it legitimacy and stability which allows it to introduce reform while maintaining continuity, that the rituals give it a special link with the people. It is ironic how the French had overthrown their own monarchies but, perhaps hoping for these potential benefits, chose to strengthen the monarchy in Morocco.


In theory Morocco has a constitutional monarchy. In reality Mohammed is far more than a figurehead. He has the final say on every matter of importance, and without him, the country’s political factions tend to descend into impotent bickering. The Middle East is littered with the wrecks of regimes that have failed to act decisively in moments of crisis. “We’re a plane without a pilot,” frets a former official.

[...]

Some academics believe that the institution of monarchy helped Morocco avoid the revolutions that swept the Arab world in 2011. Unlike the presidents of neighbouring republics, the king could quickly introduce reforms while still representing stability and continuity. The sense of Morocco’s monarchy as something timeless and ancient is inculcated from an early age. Schoolchildren are taught that their royal house goes back to the eighth century.

[...]

Historically, the Alawi dynasty from which Mohammed descends were sultans whose authority could be patchy. When the French colonised Morocco in the late 19th century, they centralised the state and formalised its boundaries. They also boosted the authority of the sultan (who later became the king), introducing Throne Day rituals in the 1930s. They turned the sultan’s deputies, or makhzen, into a modern bureaucracy.

Today the makhzen is a sprawling state apparatus encompassing elected and appointed officials. Placing great emphasis on elaborate protocols, it has become an institution in its own right as well as an extension of the monarchy (Moroccans also use the term makhzen to convey something like the “deep state”, describing the influence of powerful business and political elites).
 
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For example, the Western Sahara is critical to Morocco's identity and sense of projection into Africa. Mohammed started having them supervise his takeover of the Western Sahara and gave them access to his royal jet. He would give them cars.

“[The Azaitar brothers] use military jets, they have carte blanche to function in the palace as they want, they can go to the garage and pick up the cars they want,” says a royal insider. “It’s so bizarre.” (1843 magazine put the allegations in this piece to both the Azaitars and the Moroccan government, but received no response.)

[...]

They “boss around ministers”, grumbles one courtier. “They treat provincial governors like their drivers,” adds a businessman. The king “has made it pretty clear to all his ministers that they can speak on his behalf”, says a former friend. “They can call ministries for permissions for any stuff they want, direct and unfettered access.”

To the horror of former confidantes, the Azaitars replaced them as the king’s gatekeepers. Now it is the boys from Frechen who decide who receives an audience and who gets sent away. Senior officials have reportedly been shown the door. “They would even ask his sisters and cousins to leave,” says a former member of the royal inner circle.

An outlet loyal to the government, Hespress, said the brothers wielded a “Rasputin-like influence”

All this seems to go well beyond "normal" largesse towards royal favorites.

The following paragraph did make me laugh:

The Azaitars’ behaviour irked the makhzen, as did the privileges they accrued. Some of this was pure snobbery. The makhzen treasure ornate craftsmanship; the brothers prefer bling. In March 2022 they opened another fast-food joint along Rabat’s riverfront and stationed a bright pink Lamborghini outside the door. For further effect they added a huge pink unicorn, pink giraffe and two prancing blue stallions to the entrance. Next door they set up a doughnut shop with a crown on its logo and a giant throne made of doughnuts outside.
 
...they set up a doughnut shop with a crown on its logo and a giant throne made of doughnuts outside...

The king of donuts? I call that great marketing.
 
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Concerning studies about the longlasting non-guidance by the King.
I can confirm that the people are unhappy for a long time by the corrupt system of the gov&monarchy, though many don't dare to talk openly in public, in private they do.

Let's hope someone steps in and takes over. The current King was never a good "choice".

https://csis-website-prod.s3.amazon...df?VersionId=X8C5xhgYzcbaqBKgSn2ko6uUABa3mbYs

This news story (in the foreign press, of course) from last summer would seem to be an instance of the pattern discussed in Nicholas Pelham's article of the king substituting his responsibilities at home with travel and partying with the Azaitar brothers.

https://www.vanitatis.elconfidencia...mohamed-vi-dando-tumbos-calles-paris_3480149/
https://www.hln.be/royalty/beelden-...t-en-dat-roept-vragen-en-kritiek-op~aa3bba94/

King Mohammed VI abruptly canceled his attendance at celebrations of the national holiday on July 30, 2022, and went to Paris. The Palace did not reveal the reasons for the Paris visit, and the foreign media at first reported that he was going for treatment of his heart problems, as he had done previously. However, pictures surfaced on social media of the king walking the streets of Paris accompanied by bodyguards and the Azaitar brothers. The king carried what appeared to be a glass of wine, and appeared to be stumbling and leaning on his bodyguards as if drunk. (In Morocco, it is illegal to sell alcohol to Muslims.) The king received criticism on social media over the images, and his social media manager responded by saying that the king was not drunk, but had tripped because he lost his balance when he turned to greet others, and that he was carrying water, not wine. Others defended the king by saying he might be under the influence of heart medication.
 
This news story (in the foreign press, of course) from last summer would seem to be an instance of the pattern discussed in Nicholas Pelham's article of the king substituting his responsibilities at home with travel and partying with the Azaitar brothers.

https://www.vanitatis.elconfidencia...mohamed-vi-dando-tumbos-calles-paris_3480149/
https://www.hln.be/royalty/beelden-...t-en-dat-roept-vragen-en-kritiek-op~aa3bba94/

King Mohammed VI abruptly canceled his attendance at celebrations of the national holiday on July 30, 2022, and went to Paris. The Palace did not reveal the reasons for the Paris visit, and the foreign media at first reported that he was going for treatment of his heart problems, as he had done previously. However, pictures surfaced on social media of the king walking the streets of Paris accompanied by bodyguards and the Azaitar brothers. The king carried what appeared to be a glass of wine, and appeared to be stumbling and leaning on his bodyguards as if drunk. (In Morocco, it is illegal to sell alcohol to Muslims.) The king received criticism on social media over the images, and his social media manager responded by saying that the king was not drunk, but had tripped because he lost his balance when he turned to greet others, and that he was carrying water, not wine. Others defended the king by saying he might be under the influence of heart medication.
That’s not a good look. Honestly, he should spend more time in Morocco as well as disassociate himself from those Azaitar brothers. He might give his son a shaky throne to deal with.
 
Wow, now he really looks sick, lost a lot of weight and fingers are frail.
Marrocain taxi driver told me the King is seriously ill these days.

Let's hope this is a wake-up call for him to get back to what he used tobe, a hope for modernisation.
all the best!

seems as if he gets more active now than suring the last 10 years.
hopefully he can stabilise the situation and prepare his follower.

https://www.maroc.ma/en/news/historic-election-morocco-2024-un-human-rights-council-presidency
 
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