Introductory/State Visits to Sweden, Norway, Faroe Islands & Greenland: 2024, 2025


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What a pity. What would have been a busy week for the couple all of sudden the have some quiet time
Hopefully something will be able to be added to their calendars on such short notice.
 
I agree with not rocking the boat they are all in because of the strike, But as I recall reading somewhere in here, the current activity of royal visits in the Scandinavia/Baltic Sea area are also related to a major threat to absolutely everyone, a potential invasion and takeover of all Baltic States including Finland and possibly Poland by Putin's Russia.
A successful invasion war next to Denmark, Norway and Sweden could also dare Putin to continue and take over half of Europe in one move. The Scandinavian visits we are seen lately means things in the background are at work to get ready eight countries to fight together for their lives. Even the armies of Spain and Portugal are preparing for a war or an invasion from Russia to the European Union.

That strike needs to be solved so Sweden, and all governments, prepare for the worst. Remember 2 years ago no one would have believed Putin would invade a European country and he did.
 
"King Frederik and Queen Mary will make their first official visit to the Faroe Islands in June 2025.
They were supposed to have completed the visit in June this year, but that caused an extensive and week-long strike on the Faroe Islands.
It will now be next year instead. Specifically, June 11 to 13, 2025.
This is apparent from a notice on the website of the Faroese lagmandskontor.
- Many people are putting effort into putting together an exciting and versatile program for the visit, which was originally planned for June 12 to 14 this year.
- The plan is to stick to the same schedule for the visit next summer, when the royal couple will visit Tórshavn, Vágur, Fámjin, Tvøroyri and Eidi, it reads."

Makes sense. With their already set plans to Greenland and the summer cruise, taken with the limited sailing time for the Dannebrog.

Here is to Greenland next week
 
Glad to see that a new date for the Faroe Islands visit has been set. I figured the trip would be pushed to 2025.
 
Detailed program for the Greenland visit has been published on the royal house official website. They have a full week ahead. I counted 41 different events so there will be much to see and talk about in the following week :)
 
So looking forward to this visit. A busy agenda but I'm sure the couple will enjoy it.
And nice to see a mini royal run will take place.

Before their visit the royal couple gave an interview to Sermitsiaq

- I have got the country under my skin, says the king in this exclusive interview.

- Greenland has taught me to live in harmony with nature. Greenlanders respect nature and follow its course, he said.

 
So looking forward to this visit. A busy agenda but I'm sure the couple will enjoy it.
And nice to see a mini royal run will take place.
I counted at least 41 engagements, mostly joint ones. I am sure all the people that were asking about why they were doing so many solo events will enjoy following this trip! The only day currently with no official events is July 3rd as that is listed as "transport" day. But alot of interesting and varied sounding engagements over the 8 days.
 
First photos from Pituffik Rosa Kanuthsen modtog kongeparret i nationaldragt
Love how they visit far off bases and villages. Not just the main cities.

On today's agenda also a visit to Qaanaaq where thr King started his 4 months Sirius 2000 expedition.

I'm sure the Couple is still recovering from yesterday's emotional and exciting day.

Here is the program for the first day. June 29.

Arrival at Pituffik Space Base. 10:45 am
The Regent Couple arrives at Pituffik Space Base, where Their Majesties are received by the President of Naalakkersuisut Múte Bourup Egede, national ombudsman Julie Priest Wilche, head of department Hans-Peder Barlach Christensen and head of protocol Jakob Rohmann Hard.

Reception in Qaanaaq. 1:25 pm
The Regent Couple arrives in Qaanaaq in North Greenland, where they are received at the airport by mayor Palle Jeremiassen and members of the municipal council. Qaanaaq is Greenland's northernmost city, where the King started and ended the Sirius 2000 expedition in 2000.

Reception at the Town Hall in Qaanaaq 1:50 pm
The Regent Couple arrives at the Town Hall in Qaanaaq, where the municipality hosts a reception for invited guests.

Kaffemik in the sports hall in Qaanaaq. 2:30 pm
The Regent Couple takes part in a coffee meeting in the sports hall in Qaanaaq, where there will be a number of musical and cultural performances by the city's citizens.

Arrival at Aasiaat. 6:45 pm
The Regent Couple arrives in Aasiaat, where Mayor Ane Hansen and members of the municipal council receive Their Majesties at the airport. Aasiaat is located in the southwest corner of Disko Bay on Greenland's west coast and is Greenland's fifth largest city.

Reception at Aasiaat Museum and Niels Egedes Plads. 7:00 pm
The Regent Couple are received by a cannon salute and choral singing at the Aasiaat Museum, after which the King and Queen will stroll to Niels Egedes Plads, where there will be entertainment with music and dance.

Boarding the Royal Yacht Dannebrog. 8:15 pm
The Regent Couple boards the Royal Yacht Dannebrog.
 
Thank you for posting about Day 1. It is an important and extensive trip. Hopefully the DRF social media will post something soon.

Also, per some reports, Princess Josephine and Prince Vincent are with them. I saw a link to an article.
 
Thank you for posting about Day 1. It is an important and extensive trip. Hopefully the DRF social media will post something soon.

Also, per some reports, Princess Josephine and Prince Vincent are with them. I saw a link to an article.

Exciting! It'll be good for the twins, and maybe all 4 kids will join later.


From DRF day 1
 
That's good news.
With the school holidays having started, that's a good opportunity for them to have some quality time with their parents and experience something.
They will be gushed over by the Greenlanders! Josephine being a wonderful little ham, will probably enjoy the attention. And Vincent may learn to his slight embarrassment that he too has become quite interesting... He's now teenage and grandma-bait. :giggle:

I'm sure Isabella and Christian (for the few hours at a time he's sober) can look after themselves. In contrast to us mere mortal parents, there is little risk they will throw a spontaneous party and turn the house upside down without interference from PET or courtiers.
 
That picture of Frederik with the sunglasses? So cool. It's obvious that Greenland means a lot to him, and he always looks so happy when he's there.
 
Lovely way to include the twins in this visit, so the people could still see them without much pressure on the two of them.
 
What great photos! So sweet how close they got to everyone! Just super laid back and casual. And, that just why Frederik and Mary are so loved in Greenland. Plus, there is no stringent so called protocol needing to be adhered to either. No need to bow or curtsey. It is refreshing and lovely to watch.

 
Both the Vessel Finder and Marine Traffic websites have Dannebrog back-tracking quite a way at the moment.
Maybe they are just killing time to arrive on schedule … unless the weather has cracked up and it’s not safe to berth the ship where they planned.

I hope someone gets Mary and Frederik some gloves or mittens.
I don’t like the photos of them talking to people with their hands in their pockets … that would have been considered bad manners in my younger days, like not removing your sunglasses when talking face to face.

I know the world has changed and things are more relaxed, but it looks like they are feeling the cold, and it doesn’t look very regal for an official visit.

The Danish navy ship Triton is sailing with Dannebrog.

As it is still so early local time, I think both vessels are just using up time sailing towards and then away from the port, until it is appropriate to arrive.

Whales and icebergs, Disko Bay, I’ve seen a lot of YouTube’s about this area … it’s a place on adventure travel minds now.

But, Angelica … candied Angelica was one such a rarity, and expensive. Interesting to hear it grows wild in this area.
 
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Using Ivalo and Minik was very special.

Program for Day 2, June 30

Boat trip with Arctic Station. 9:45 am
The Regent couple takes part in a boat trip at Qeqertarsuaq, where Their Majesties are briefed on the Arctic Station's work and inaugurate a new whale microphone. Qeqertarsuaq is home to the research station Arctic Station, which is run by the University of Copenhagen and aims to promote scientific Arctic research. The new sound station gives insight into the presence of marine mammals in Disko Bay.

Reception at the King's Bridge in Qeqertarsuaq. 11:45 am
The Regent Couple arrives on the royal yacht Dannebrog at the Kongebroen in Qeqertarsuaq, where the Regent Couple are received by mayor Ane Hansen and members of the municipal council. Qeqertarsuaq is located on the south side of the island of Qeqertarsuaq, which is Greenland's largest island.

Reception at Hotel Qeqertarsuaq. 12:00pm
The Regent couple attends a reception at Hotel Qeqertarsuaq hosted by the municipality.

Orientation on the Inoqatikka project in Qeqertarsuaq. 1:15 pm
The Regent Couple participates in a briefing on the Inoqatikka project, which is mentalisation training for civil servants who work with children in the municipality.

Commencement of the Qeqertarsuaq Race, Family Mile. 2:30 pm
The Regent Couple arrives in the town centre of Qeqertarsuaq, where the King starts the Qeqertarsuaq Run, Family Mile. The run is for all island residents.

What great photos! So sweet how close they got to everyone! Just super laid back and casual. And, that just why Frederik and Mary are so loved in Greenland. Plus, there is no stringent so called protocol needing to be adhered to either. No need to bow or curtsey. It is refreshing and lovely to watch.


Just what we needed the King holding a cute little baby
https://content.invisioncic.com/r38...humb.jpg.c68d03df954aa08a29c8fb5ead4669ce.jpg 😍
 
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The Danish navy ship Triton is sailing with Dannebrog.

As it is still so early local time, I think both vessels are just using up time sailing towards and then away from the port, until it is appropriate to arrive.

Whales and icebergs, Disko Bay, I’ve seen a lot of YouTube’s about this area … it’s a place on adventure travel minds now.

But, Angelica … candied Angelica was one such a rarity, and expensive. Interesting to hear it grows wild in this area.
Yes, Triton is an older ship by now.
A patrol frigate for arctic conditions.
A warship always patrols Dannebrog when in Greenland. Partly to act like a tender, helicopter platform, hospital, rescue vessel and on rarer occasions an icebreaker.

And it has happened that the escort vessel has had to step in. Early on in FX&QMs marriage, on their first trip to Greenland I think, the weather was atrocious as it so often is, so the DRF members had to board the escort vessel to go by helicopter to a destination inland. Queen Mary later told that this was a new and slightly unsettling situation for her, because for once she had to remain passive and let someone else, albeit very competent, handle everything. I.e. entrusting her safety in the hands of strangers in what may have been a somewhat alarming situation for her.

There is nothing odd in Dannebrog making a detour or two while there. After all that's one of the reasons volunteering for conscription to Dannebrog is so sought after. The conscripts get to see something they might otherwise never see. Like whales in an Arctic fjord.

ADDED:
Triton is an interesting ship, for those interested in such things.
A patrol-frigate for arctic conditions, she is lightly armed but carries a heck of a lot of additional equipment you'd hardly ever see on other frigates. Apart from that her hull is reinforced so she can break ice up to a considerable size.
But the most striking difference is her crows-nest.
Above the bridge you will notice a thick mast, with a radar dome on top. Just below that are windows - the crows nest.
Ships that sail in arctic waters have crows nests. Period!
From the bridge you can only see that far, from a crows nest you can see further and you can also peek above minor icebergs, better access cracks in an ice-field and better see if there is something orange in the water. It also helps to better judge how stable an iceberg is. Because you know only a tenth of an iceberg is above water. - And if an iceberg is unstable it may suddenly turn over and that can seriously ruin the rest of your life if your ship happens to be too close... But sometimes you can't avoid having to sail past such a thing.
All that is something a radar can't tell you.

Beforehand such a crows nest was basically a large mug attached to the foremast, which you climbed into and after a short while you were very cold!
Titanic also had such a crows nest on her foremast. Enclosed, pure luxury at the time, but no heating. So the lookouts, there were always two, had a bottle of brandy to help keep them warm. There was also a phone line directly to the bridge. It was very modern. And as you may recall the lookouts did try and contact the bridge, but..

Today such a crows nest on a modern larger ship is spacious, heated, comfortable and equipped with all kinds of observation-gear. But smaller Greenlandic fishing vessels and smaller patrol boats still have an open crows nest. Because it's simple and it works. No windows icing over, no extra cost, and very little extra weight.
 
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Prince Minik and Princess Ivalo joined their parents on Dannebrog's deck when leaving Aasiaat today 😊

Nu starter kongeparrets togt


In the video with the twins, you can hear the crowd yell "Ivalo" and "Minik" just like they did for the family's visit 10 years ago. No doubt the twins have a special place in Greenland's heart.
BB has some more photos of the twins and their parents

 
Yes, Triton is an older ship by now.
A patrol frigate for arctic conditions.
A warship always patrols Dannebrog when in Greenland. Partly to act like a tender, helicopter platform, hospital, rescue vessel and on rarer occasions an icebreaker.

And it has happened that the escort vessel has had to step in. Early on in FX&QMs marriage, on their first trip to Greenland I think, the weather was atrocious as it so often is, so the DRF members had to board the escort vessel to go by helicopter to a destination inland. Queen Mary later told that this was a new and slightly unsettling situation for her, because for once she had to remain passive and let someone else, albeit very competent, handle everything. I.e. entrusting her safety in the hands of strangers in what may have been a somewhat alarming situation for her.

There is nothing odd in Dannebrog making a detour or two while there. After all that's one of the reasons volunteering for conscription to Dannebrog is so sought after. The conscripts get to see something they might otherwise never see. Like whales in an Arctic fjord.

ADDED:
Triton is an interesting ship, for those interested in such things.
A patrol-frigate for arctic conditions, she is lightly armed but carries a heck of a lot of additional equipment you'd hardly ever see on other frigates. Apart from that her hull is reinforced so she can break ice up to a considerable size.
But the most striking difference is her crows-nest.
Above the bridge you will notice a thick mast, with a radar dome on top. Just below that are windows - the crows nest.
Ships that sail in arctic waters have crows nests. Period!
From the bridge you can only see that far, from a crows nest you can see further and you can also peek above minor icebergs, better access cracks in an ice-field and better see if there is something orange in the water. It also helps to better judge how stable an iceberg is. Because you know only a tenth of an iceberg is above water. - And if an iceberg is unstable it may suddenly turn over and that can seriously ruin the rest of your life if your ship happens to be too close... But sometimes you can't avoid having to sail past such a thing.
All that is something a radar can't tell you.

Beforehand such a crows nest was basically a large mug attached to the foremast, which you climbed into and after a short while you were very cold!
Titanic also had such a crows nest on her foremast. Enclosed, pure luxury at the time, but no heating. So the lookouts, there were always two, had a bottle of brandy to help keep them warm. There was also a phone line directly to the bridge. It was very modern. And as you may recall the lookouts did try and contact the bridge, but..

Today such a crows nest on a modern larger ship is spacious, heated, comfortable and equipped with all kinds of observation-gear. But smaller Greenlandic fishing vessels and smaller patrol boats still have an open crows nest. Because it's simple and it works. No windows icing over, no extra cost, and very little extra weight.
Yes, Triton is an older ship by now.
A patrol frigate for arctic conditions.
A warship always patrols Dannebrog when in Greenland. Partly to act like a tender, helicopter platform, hospital, rescue vessel and on rarer occasions an icebreaker.

And it has happened that the escort vessel has had to step in. Early on in FX&QMs marriage, on their first trip to Greenland I think, the weather was atrocious as it so often is, so the DRF members had to board the escort vessel to go by helicopter to a destination inland. Queen Mary later told that this was a new and slightly unsettling situation for her, because for once she had to remain passive and let someone else, albeit very competent, handle everything. I.e. entrusting her safety in the hands of strangers in what may have been a somewhat alarming situation for her.

There is nothing odd in Dannebrog making a detour or two while there. After all that's one of the reasons volunteering for conscription to Dannebrog is so sought after. The conscripts get to see something they might otherwise never see. Like whales in an Arctic fjord.

ADDED:
Triton is an interesting ship, for those interested in such things.
A patrol-frigate for arctic conditions, she is lightly armed but carries a heck of a lot of additional equipment you'd hardly ever see on other frigates. Apart from that her hull is reinforced so she can break ice up to a considerable size.
But the most striking difference is her crows-nest.
Above the bridge you will notice a thick mast, with a radar dome on top. Just below that are windows - the crows nest.
Ships that sail in arctic waters have crows nests. Period!
From the bridge you can only see that far, from a crows nest you can see further and you can also peek above minor icebergs, better access cracks in an ice-field and better see if there is something orange in the water. It also helps to better judge how stable an iceberg is. Because you know only a tenth of an iceberg is above water. - And if an iceberg is unstable it may suddenly turn over and that can seriously ruin the rest of your life if your ship happens to be too close... But sometimes you can't avoid having to sail past such a thing.
All that is something a radar can't tell you.

Beforehand such a crows nest was basically a large mug attached to the foremast, which you climbed into and after a short while you were very cold!
Titanic also had such a crows nest on her foremast. Enclosed, pure luxury at the time, but no heating. So the lookouts, there were always two, had a bottle of brandy to help keep them warm. There was also a phone line directly to the bridge. It was very modern. And as you may recall the lookouts did try and contact the bridge, but..

Today such a crows nest on a modern larger ship is spacious, heated, comfortable and equipped with all kinds of observation-gear. But smaller Greenlandic fishing vessels and smaller patrol boats still have an open crows nest. Because it's simple and it works. No windows icing over, no extra cost, and very little extra weight.
Good morning, Muhler: I always appreciate your informative posts. I enjoy learning the details. So very interesting. Thank you.
 
Yes, Triton is an older ship by now.
A patrol frigate for arctic conditions.
A warship always patrols Dannebrog when in Greenland. Partly to act like a tender, helicopter platform, hospital, rescue vessel and on rarer occasions an icebreaker.

And it has happened that the escort vessel has had to step in. Early on in FX&QMs marriage, on their first trip to Greenland I think, the weather was atrocious as it so often is, so the DRF members had to board the escort vessel to go by helicopter to a destination inland. Queen Mary later told that this was a new and slightly unsettling situation for her, because for once she had to remain passive and let someone else, albeit very competent, handle everything. I.e. entrusting her safety in the hands of strangers in what may have been a somewhat alarming situation for her.

There is nothing odd in Dannebrog making a detour or two while there. After all that's one of the reasons volunteering for conscription to Dannebrog is so sought after. The conscripts get to see something they might otherwise never see. Like whales in an Arctic fjord.

ADDED:
Triton is an interesting ship, for those interested in such things.
A patrol-frigate for arctic conditions, she is lightly armed but carries a heck of a lot of additional equipment you'd hardly ever see on other frigates. Apart from that her hull is reinforced so she can break ice up to a considerable size.
But the most striking difference is her crows-nest.
Above the bridge you will notice a thick mast, with a radar dome on top. Just below that are windows - the crows nest.
Ships that sail in arctic waters have crows nests. Period!
From the bridge you can only see that far, from a crows nest you can see further and you can also peek above minor icebergs, better access cracks in an ice-field and better see if there is something orange in the water. It also helps to better judge how stable an iceberg is. Because you know only a tenth of an iceberg is above water. - And if an iceberg is unstable it may suddenly turn over and that can seriously ruin the rest of your life if your ship happens to be too close... But sometimes you can't avoid having to sail past such a thing.
All that is something a radar can't tell you.

Beforehand such a crows nest was basically a large mug attached to the foremast, which you climbed into and after a short while you were very cold!
Titanic also had such a crows nest on her foremast. Enclosed, pure luxury at the time, but no heating. So the lookouts, there were always two, had a bottle of brandy to help keep them warm. There was also a phone line directly to the bridge. It was very modern. And as you may recall the lookouts did try and contact the bridge, but..

Today such a crows nest on a modern larger ship is spacious, heated, comfortable and equipped with all kinds of observation-gear. But smaller Greenlandic fishing vessels and smaller patrol boats still have an open crows nest. Because it's simple and it works. No windows icing over, no extra cost, and very little extra weight.
Thank you for such a deep explanation Muhler, I appreciate it as I’m fond of all things nautical.

I remember photos of Mary undergoing the ceremony of crossing the Arctic Circle … at least she was covered head to toe in protective clothing. A truly foul experience if it is similar to the crossing the Equator ceremonies I’ve seen.

As Mary has done it, I wonder if the children have yet.
Probably not, they are too young, and it’s not compulsory in any case.

But, I thought it showed Mary has a lot of spunk to go through it on what was probably that first trip.
How long do they keep those things rotting in the ship’s galley to get that almighty stink they cover you in.
 
What's that on Josephine's lip? A cold-sore?
 
I hadn’t noticed. She’s wearing braces, and those can be uncomfortable, so maybe she bit her lip by accident.
Yes. As someone who wore metal braces like Josphine is now, they are extremely uncomfortable and can cause all sorts of issues for your lips, inside of cheeks etc. I am sure it is not easy being a 13 year old girl, having braces that could make you self conscious, that can change the appearance of your mouth, face, smile...and have to do it all in the public eye with people scrutinizing and judging your appearance constantly. Or, making assumptions about what your are doing just by the way you're standing.
 
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What's that on Josephine's lip? A cold-sore?
I think you’re right Muhler, looks like she has a cold sore when you enlarge the photos in this article.

And ready to do a Vogue fashion spread will those poses.

(Good to see the gloves in use today.)

 
Well, looking at this photo, including Josephine's lip, it's clear that Queen Mary can't talk her way out of being Vincent's mother.

Some of you may ask: Why on earth do they visit a weather station in the middle of absolutely nowhere?!? Isn't there anything more important to look at? Whales for example?

No doubt, but whales at least have an annoying tendency to refuse to perform just because humans would like to look at them. It's actually very un-cooperative of the critters and someone really ought to do something about it.
But those of you who have flown to America to Europe will notice that you fly across or close to the Arctic, because there are literally tons of aviation fuel to safe, not to mention time, and that amount to very serious money.
So the airlines are very interested in the weather data coming in from weather stations. I.e. jet-streams, wind direction, wind-speed, any sign of a storm coming in and so on. And as many air corridors to and from Europe/America are across or near Greenland, the airlines pay good money to get the latest weather-info.
And the weather-station the Regent Couple visited today is among one of the most northern stations in Greenland, and as such in the world.

Apart from that these weather stations also monitor water temperatures, precipitation in order to gather info on global warming. Global warming is a fact. That is beyond doubt. The causes may be debatable though, because there is a reason why Greenland was named Greenland, when the first Scandinavians landed around 1.000 years ago - and why the Inuits could race across northern Canada and down Greenland around the same time. (That journey took them less than 1.000 years.)
But... Unless the global warming become totally irreversible, the ice will come back. And the current ice-age we live that has lasted IIRC for 5 million years, will continue for another 5 million or so years, until the continents have shifted enough to prevent sea-ice from forming near the North Pole. - We humans have merely established ourselves in a short inter-glacial period.
So back in the 70's the data from the weather stations were used to try and predict when the glaciers would come back.
Well, they won't come back for quite a while. Or will they?
Because one the reasons why it is possible to live and thrive in Greenland, at least along to more hospitable west coast, is the warm Gulf Stream. A part of which is send up between Canada and Greenland.
But, ehh... if too much Arctic ice melts too fast, so much cold water will flow south that it may push the Gulf Stream further south or interrupt the flow of warm water altogether. And then it's going to get seriously cold in Northern Europe! While ironically northern Africa and southern Europe will get even warmer than it is already getting right now.
I fear my grandchildren, should I get any, may live in interesting times.
 
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