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Emmy 06-10-2006 05:21 AM

Royals with Disabilities or Special Needs
 
I know this is somewhat of an odd topic, but I couldn't help wondering.

What happens if a member of the royal family gives birth to a child with an intellectual disability such as Down Syndrome, or something similar? Has it ever happened?

I realise that with modern screening and technology, the chance of this happening is close to zero, but it must have happened in the past.

betina 06-10-2006 05:30 AM

Yes the crownprince of Prussias daughter Alexandrine suffered from downs syndrome

https://worldroots.com/brigitte/royal...russia1915.jpg

Margrethe II 06-10-2006 05:56 AM

HRH the Prince John suffered from epilepsy and, most likely, Asperger syndrome which is a form of autism.

He was 13 years of age when he died in 1919.

Prince John Charles Francis was the youngest child of Their Majesties, the King George V & Queen Mary (formerly, Duke & Duchess of York).

The little Prince resided at Wood Farm on the Sandringham estate and was well taken care of until his passing, especially by his devoted nurse & confidante, Miss Charlotte Bill.

"MII"

Warren 06-10-2006 07:15 AM

• Prince Francois of France (b 1961), the eldest son of the Comte de Paris, Head of the Royal House of France, and
• Princess Blanche, the Comte's youngest daughter (b 1962) are both handicapped.

• Princess Cornelie-Cecile of Prussia (b 1978), the sister of Prince George Friedrich, Head of the Imperial and Royal House of Prussia.

• Archduke Philipp of Austria (b 1962) suffered terrible burns as a child and was severely disfigured.

• Princess Christina of The Netherlands (b 1947)

Emmy 06-10-2006 08:15 AM

Cool, thanks guys. I was thinking more in terms of if that child was the heir, what would happen? And has it ever happened?

juliamontague 06-10-2006 01:47 PM

Kaiser Wilhelm II. of Germany had a disabled arm

Little_star 06-10-2006 02:01 PM

I'm not sure if people would count it as a disability per se, although I know it's classed as a learning disaility, but doesn't Princess Beatrice suffer from dyslexia?

purple_platinum 06-10-2006 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little_star
I'm not sure if people would count it as a disability per se, although I know it's classed as a learning disaility, but doesn't Princess Beatrice suffer from dyslexia?

I think this thread is more of a physical dissabilities.

But, yes, there are quite several royals who suffer from dyslexia. One famous one is Victoria of Sweden.

Avalon 06-10-2006 02:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Margrethe II
HRH the Prince John suffered from epilepsy and, most likely, Asperger syndrome which is a form of autism.

He was 13 years of age when he died in 1919.

Prince John Charles Francis was the youngest child of Their Majesties, the King George V & Queen Mary (formerly, Duke & Duchess of York).

The little Prince resided at Wood Farm on the Sandringham estate and was well taken care of until his passing, especially by his devoted nurse & confidante, Miss Charlotte Bill.

"MII"

I have seen a very touching movie, "The Lost Prince", about Prince John. Miss Charlotte Bill was played by Gina McKee (who also played Irene in Forsyte Saga). I hadn't heard of the boy, before I saw the movie.
It was a really great one, and though it's a but off-topic, I would highly recommend it to everyone. :)

Benjamin 06-10-2006 03:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Emmy
Cool, thanks guys. I was thinking more in terms of if that child was the heir, what would happen? And has it ever happened?

The Comte de Clermont, even though he is severely disabled, is still the Comte de Paris's heir, although his brother, the Duc de Vendôme, will serve as regent during Clermont's term as Head of the House.

Furienna 06-10-2006 03:08 PM

It's not off-topic, Avalon. Relax! ;)

And yes, it seems like we have a history with dyslectics in our Swedish royal family. It wouldn't have mattered to a commoner, but royal kids have to go to the best schools and get the best grades, especially back in the day. Our current king's father, prince Gustaf Adolf, was considered stupid, especially since his father the crown prince Gustaf Adolf, who later became king Gustav VI Adolf, was more intellectual. But really, he probably just couldn't keep up with school work because no one understood he had dyslexia. Instead, he became good at sports and hunting. Unfortuneately, he almost caused a crisis by dying in a plane crash, leaving his aging father and his baby son as the only heirs to the thrown. Maybe people started understanding this more and more during the 20th century, but both king Carl Gustaf and crown princess Victoria have seemed to do better than their father and grandfather did.

crisiñaki 06-10-2006 04:09 PM

https://www.abc.es/informacion/boda/r...pana/index.asp
and read the profile of Queen Victoria Eugenia

I don't know if this counts but Alfonso Pio (*1907,†1938) and Gonzalo (*1914,†1934); the eldest and the younger sons of King Alfonso XIII of Spain were hemophiliacs.

Zarevich Alexei, the heir of Nicholas II of Russia was an
hemophiliac as well

juliamontague 06-10-2006 05:29 PM

and many more princes suffered from hemophilia.
But no hemophiliac did ever become king.

Juanita 06-10-2006 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by purple_platinum
I think this thread is more of a physical dissabilities.

But, yes, there are quite several royals who suffer from dyslexia. One famous one is Victoria of Sweden.

Don't King Carl-Gustaf suffer also from dyslexia? :confused:

betina 06-10-2006 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ...JuAnItA...
Don't King Carl-Gustaf suffer also from dyslexia? :confused:

Yes he does

morhange 06-10-2006 06:58 PM

Prince Erik of Sweden was also an epileptic like Prince John, and I think I read somewhere that he also had severe learning disabilities, or may have been mental retarded, because his mother took medications during her pregnancy with him that she probably shouldn't have, but doctors probably didn't know would have any adverse effects.

Princess Charlotte of Prussia and her daughter, Feodora, both I think were confirmed to have porphyria, which is what made George III so, well, crazy!

There were also a lot of hemophiliac princes. Alfonso, Gonzalo and Alexei were already mentioned, but there was also Prince Waldemar and Henry of Prussia (the nephews of Kaiser Wilhelm, not his brothers) Prince Leopold of GB, Prince Rupert of Teck, Prince Friedrich of Hesse, and Prince Leopold of Battenberg. I think I may have read that Princess Sibylla of Luxembourg's brother Paul, who died young, might have been a hemophiliac, but I don't know.

bluebess 06-10-2006 08:09 PM

Warren, What disability do Prince Francois and Princess Blanche of France have? Also Princess Cornelie-Cecile of Prussia? Thanks:)

zarzuela 06-10-2006 08:11 PM

Also, HRH the Infanta Margarita (King Juan Carlos' youngest sister) has been blind since birth.

Margrethe II 06-10-2006 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by purple_platinum
I think this thread is more of a physical dissabilities.

But, yes, there are quite several royals who suffer from dyslexia. One famous one is Victoria of Sweden.

I thought HM the King also suffered from Dyslexia?

"MII"

Margrethe II 06-10-2006 08:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Avalon
I have seen a very touching movie, "The Lost Prince", about Prince John. Miss Charlotte Bill was played by Gina McKee (who also played Irene in Forsyte Saga). I hadn't heard of the boy, before I saw the movie.
It was a really great one, and though it's a but off-topic, I would highly recommend it to everyone. :)

I have seen the same movie Avalon :)

I believe I watched it some time back now, in 2003, but it was a good movie although I couldn't help feel that they depicted Queen Mary as a really cold mother.

"MII"

Von Schlesian 06-10-2006 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Margrethe II
I have seen the same movie Avalon :)

I believe I watched it some time back now, in 2003, but it was a good movie although I couldn't help feel that they depicted Queen Mary as a really cold mother.

"MII"

I enjoyed the film too, Miranda Richardson performed very well as HM Queen Mary, but yes Margrethe II, a bit stern (even though it's probably more to do with her not being able to understand what was wrong with 'Johnny').

Her Majesty is also portrayed as a very brave woman in the fact of suffragettes and pacifists. Along with Sir Michael Gambon, as HM King Edward VII earlier in the film, it's most enjoyable.

Benjamin 06-10-2006 08:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bluebess
What disability do Prince Francois and Princess Blanche of France have?

The siblings are both mentally handicaped due to the fact that the then Comtesse de Clermont suffered from toxoplasmosis during the two pregnancies.

Benjamin 06-10-2006 08:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bluebess
Thank you Benjamin.:)

You are very welcome bluebess:).

Toxoplasmosis is very prevelant in France due to the high consumption of raw and lightly cooked meat. Apparently the disease only tends to affect people with weakened immune systems, and the effects on unborn children can be very damaging (the Orleans pair case in point).

Toxoplasmosis

bluebess 06-10-2006 09:34 PM

Thank you again for the info. It must have been so awful for the family. To have one handicapped child is so hard but to have two is an unbelievable heartache. My sister has two handicapped boys and it can be a very rough road but we cannot forget the joy that the boys have brought to our family.

Benjamin 06-10-2006 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bluebess
Thank you again for the info. It must have been so awful for the family. To have one handicapped child is so hard but to have two is an unbelievable heartache. My sister has two handicapped boys and it can be a very rough road but we cannot forget the joy that the boys have brought to our family.

You're probably very correct about the impact on the family. I wouldn't be surprised if it didn't contribute somewhat to the breakdown of Henri and Marie-Therese's marriage.

It seems that alot of the time that those children/adults who have special challenges are the most friendly and kind people that you can ever meet.

m 12 06-10-2006 10:44 PM

Beatrice, the eldest daugher of prince Andrew is also dyslexic.

LadyK 01-07-2007 09:42 AM

You have to remember, that not all that long ago, disabilities, especcially mental disabilities were not understood nor treated as well as they are. Even here in the U.S., there are some presidential examples of that. President Franklin Delano Rosevelt spent his presidency hiding his lameness, which resulted from a bout with adult polio, for fear that it would be construed as weakness. And President John F. Kennedy's sister Rosalyn Kennedy was born with mental disabilities, then her family had her undergo a lobotomy as they thought it would 'cure' her. It didn't, of course, and actually made her worse. She was sent away, and lived in a special nursing facility (in Michigan, I think?) where she spent the rest of her life, until she died a few years ago. Even recently, I had a family friend when I was younger who's son was mentally handicapped, and the people at the school he went to assumed that he came from an unhappy and unhealthy home.


Royals who were handicapped, particularly mentally handicapped, if they were in position to inherit, were often forced to abdicate. I remember a British prince who was forced to abdicate (this was a long time ago, a very long time ago, and I don't remember who)

Several other royals, some hundreds of years ago, had gout. Henry VIII had gout, and so did many others, to the point where they often had difficulty walking, due to their bad diets.

Next Star 01-07-2007 02:10 PM

The late King Talal of Jordan who was the late King Hussein of Jordan's father had schizopherina and the late Tsarevich Alexi of Russia who was the son of the late Czar Nicholas II of Russia had haemophilia which he inherited from his mother the late Czaria Alexandra of Russia.

fee 01-07-2007 03:11 PM

In earlier times the royals didn't have much contact with the public, thus their debilitating illnesses were well covered within the walls of the royal palaces.
The fact that hardly anybody knows about Prince John is quite telling. I wouldn't go so far to say that his very existence was kept secret, but it certainly wasn't talked about and it was clearly in the royals best interest that the public should forget or not know about the unlucky little boy.
Another hidden disease is Queen Alexandra of Britains congenital deafness, which she most likely passed on to her oldest son, the anyway unlucky Duke of Clarence. However, no reliable source can be found, only hints and rumours. (It would probably been different had he survived and ascended to the throne, but alas he died anyway, no need to bring out his deafness into the open.)

MargreteI 01-07-2007 04:23 PM

King Christian VII of Denmark and Norway was mentally ill and absolute monarch, secound only to good. :wacko:

Saturn 01-07-2007 04:53 PM

The former King of Spain Alphonso XIII had six children, the eldest was the crown prince but he died when he still was young, the second son was deaf and was obliged to give up his rights to the spanish throne in favour of his smaller brother (the father of King JC).

Stefanie 01-07-2007 05:34 PM

King Ludwig II (Bavaria) and his brother Otto...
 
...are said to have been mentally disturbed. Both became incapacitated.

flora 01-08-2007 01:05 PM

Wasn't Prince Philip's mother Princess Andrew of Greece deaf ?

Rebafan81 01-08-2007 01:34 PM

This is a great thread, thanks for starting it. I have nothing to contribute but love to read about what is posted.

bonnita 01-10-2007 07:04 AM

I didnt know Christina of Netherlands was Handicapped? in wat way?

BeatrixFan 01-10-2007 08:56 AM

She was born blind if I remember correctly.

ZandraRae 01-10-2007 09:46 AM

Correct BeatrixFan, Juliana suffered some kind of illness (I can't remember what exactly) during her pregnancy and so Christina was born blind. But even due to her blindness, she led a very normal life.

Stefanie 01-10-2007 10:15 AM

Juliana and Christina
 
Juliana was sick with German measles when she was pregnant with Christina.

acdc1 07-11-2007 02:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by purple_platinum (Post 453880)
I think this thread is more of a physical dissabilities.

But, yes, there are quite several royals who suffer from dyslexia. One famous one is Victoria of Sweden.

Yes, there are quite a few who suffer from dyslexia, but they can get help and they live normal productive lives. Are people more open about mental and physical handicaps in royalty today than they used to be? The sent poor Prince John to a farm and kept him out of the public eye.

igilmo 07-11-2007 03:54 PM

King Juan Carlos I of Spain is said to have some disfunction in one of his ears, just as his father had. It's nothing serious though. His sister Infanta Margarita of Spain, duchess of Soria, is blind but she is leading a normal life. She is married with two children and is able to speak at least 5 languages and plays the piano.

scooter 07-11-2007 06:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flora (Post 556300)
Wasn't Prince Philip's mother Princess Andrew of Greece deaf ?

Yes, and IIRC she was also mentally unstable later in life. Thank goodness, neither problem seems to be passed on in the family.:flowers:

Elspeth 07-11-2007 07:38 PM

Prince Katsura of Japan has been confined to a wheelchair after a series of strokes in the late 1980s.

Henri M. 07-12-2007 02:35 AM

Crisis at the Court due to Christina's blindness
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ZandraRae (Post 557045)
Correct BeatrixFan, Juliana suffered some kind of illness (I can't remember what exactly) during her pregnancy and so Christina was born blind. But even due to her blindness, she led a very normal life.

In 1946 Princess Juliana visited a troop ship returning in the homeland after a long journey from Netherlands East Indies (now Indonesia). On that ship the pregnant Princess became infected with Rubella. This affected the unborn child to lose her eyesight and Princess Juliana has never forgiven herself for that.

In the 1950's the parents (Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard) searched for the best treatments but all was in vain. Prince Bernhard via-via heard about a faith healer named Margaretha ('Greet') Hofmans and brought her in contact with his wife.

An action he would regret for the rest of his life. Soon it seemed that Queen Juliana has totally become under the spell of this faith healer, much to the concern of Prince Bernhard, who more and more felt like an 'unwanted person' under his own roof. According to the Prince the faith healer turned out to be a female Rasputin, influencing the head of state.

The Cabinet shared his views and apparently the (then 17 and 16 years old) Princesses Beatrix and Irene shared their father's vision. An intense war started at the Court, between the one camp under Bernhard and the other under Juliana. The Cabinet was deadly worried for the Queen and the situation of the monarchy. There even was room reserved in the Ursula Clinic in Wassenaar, a psychiatric clinic, to force the Queen into it! (No joke!)

All by all the royal couple asked three wise men to do investigations and come with proposals to solve the poisoned situation at the Court. The result was victorious for the Prince and bitter for the Queen: mrs. Hofmans had to go and the Queen should never seek contact with her again. Also many courtiers who were in 'Camp Juliana' had to leave the Royal Household. More or less a cleansing, very much against the wishes of the Queen who fiercely defended the royal prerogative which says that the King, and the King only, organizes his own Household. That report by the three wise men is still top secret and has never revealed, despite numerous requests to Queen Beatrix by historians.

The marriage of Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard suffered heavily. They remained married until their death (Juliana March 2004 and Bernhard December 2004) but lived each in their own wing of Soestdijk Palace. It became a marriage 'for the Firm' but the love was gone.

Princess Christina became a sort of a spoiled little brat, due to her overprotective mother with her feeling of guilty. In the course of the decades the Princess found her own path, living in the United States and the United Kingdom, escaping the media and the public for 'poor blind Princess Christina'.

Marengo 07-12-2007 06:23 AM

Thanks Henri, but this is of course Bernhards side of the story. I believe a recent study claims that the influence of Greet Hofmans wasn't that large at all and that the pascifist sympathies of Juliana were mainly her own and not forced upon her by some kind of female rasputin.

Henri M. 07-12-2007 07:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marengo (Post 639802)
Thanks Henri, but this is of course Bernhards side of the story. I believe a recent study claims that the influence of Greet Hofmans wasn't that large at all and that the pascifist sympathies of Juliana were mainly her own and not forced upon her by some kind of female rasputin.

Indeed, we have to wait for the official biography by prof. dr. C. Fasseur, who also wrote 'Wilhelmina / The Young Queen' and 'Wilhelmina / Warlike In A Formless Coat'.

As only outsider the Queen has exclusively granted an insight in the report of the three wise men on the Hofmans Crisis.

But some facts of Prince Bernhard's revelations have proved to be true, like the removal of Margaretha Hofmans, the dismission of many courtiers belonging to the 'Juliana Camp' and the reservation of a ward in the Ursula Clinic to hospitalize the Queen (hard to believe, but apparently true).

Charlotte1 07-12-2007 10:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scooter (Post 639602)
Yes, and IIRC she was also mentally unstable later in life. Thank goodness, neither problem seems to be passed on in the family.:flowers:

Princess Alice ( Philip's mother) wasn't mentally unstable later in life. ( Hugo Vickers book Alice, Princess Andrew of Greece is worth reading)

Alice had a mental breakdown in the late 1920's and was admited to a sanatorium in Switzerland, she eventually left but had no contact with her family for 10 years. It was the death in a plane crash of her daughter Cecilie in 1937 that brought her back to the family fold ( Philip didn't see or have contact with his mother for 10 years) Alice went back to live in Greece, stayed during the war, hid a Jewish family, continued to live in Greece until the royals were expelled in 1967 and then lived in Buckingham Palace until she died in 1969.

Verde Esmeralda 07-13-2007 09:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Henri M. (Post 639728)
An action he would regret for the rest of his life. Soon it seemed that Queen Juliana has totally become under the spell of this faith healer, much to the concern of Prince Bernhard, who more and more felt like an 'unwanted person' under his own roof. According to the Prince the faith healer turned out to be a female Rasputin, influencing the head of state.

The same thought crossed my mind...Rasputin and how much Alix (Alexandra Feodorovna, wife to Zar Nicholas II) suffered to keep him near his ill son Nikolai...

lyndaW 07-15-2007 02:59 PM

Princess Eugenie had scoliosis and was operated on.
Lady Louise Wessex had exotropia=eye tuning outward
Many Royals have poor vision
Many Royals have poor teeth
Poor Prince William is going bald

Henri M. 07-15-2007 03:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lyndaW (Post 641429)
Princess Eugenie had scoliosis and was operated on.
Lady Louise Wessex had exotropia=eye tuning outward
Many Royals have poor vision
Many Royals have poor teeth
Poor Prince William is going bald

Do you file all this under disability?

BeatrixFan 07-15-2007 03:34 PM

Indeed. Baldness is unattractive but it isn't really a disability.

FarahJoy 12-19-2007 04:28 AM

Hello, Emmy,

Though I don't know if you are still on this site since 2006 :rolleyes: I find your question interesting.

I personally think that many Royals have grown up with religious believes and traditions that do not allow them to interrupt a pregnancy. However, we don't know what their very private choices are neither within their private circle nor in the gynecologist office.

So I suspect that there might have been some "Royal abortions", in fact, considering the future of a child exposed to power and to the eyes of the public. But this is only a supposition.

rebbevb 05-18-2008 01:08 PM

I think i read that the current Duchess of Kent suffers from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Depression, & Coeliac Disease.

Jason R Maier esq 05-19-2008 08:17 PM

I also read that several of the children from Duke Robert I of Parma's first marriage were mentally retarted . . . along with one of his children from his second marriage :sad:

COUNTESS 05-19-2008 09:47 PM

[quote=LadyK;555810]You have to remember, that not all that long ago, disabilities, especcially mental disabilities were not understood nor treated as well as they are. Even here in the U.S., there are some presidential examples of that. President Franklin Delano Rosevelt spent his presidency hiding his lameness, which resulted from a bout with adult polio, for fear that it would be construed as weakness. And President John F. Kennedy's sister Rosalyn Kennedy was born with mental disabilities, then her family had her undergo a lobotomy as they thought it would 'cure' her. It didn't, of course, and actually made her worse. She was sent away, and lived in a special nursing facility (in Michigan, I think?) where she spent the rest of her life, until she died a few years ago. Even recently, I had a family friend when I was younger who's son was mentally handicapped, and the people at the school he went to assumed that he came from an unhappy and unhealthy home.

Royals who were handicapped, particularly mentally handicapped, if they were in position to inherit, were often forced to abdicate. I remember a British prince who was forced to abdicate (this was a long time ago, a very long time ago, and I don't remember who)

Several other royals, some hundreds of years ago, had gout. Henry VIII had gout, and so did many others, to the point where they often had difficulty walking, due to their bad diets.[/quote

First of all, Jack Kennedy's sister's name was Rosemary. Secondly, the lobotomy was performed, because her father, Joseph Kennedy, thought that this would keep her from becoming sexually active. He did this without his wife's or other children knowledge. They never forgave him. Crown Princess Victoria suffers from prosopagnosia, "face blindess". She can see perfectly well, but, she cannot recognize faces. This, especially, in her position is a great disability.

pamk 05-19-2008 10:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Benjamin (Post 454128)
You're probably very correct about the impact on the family. I wouldn't be surprised if it didn't contribute somewhat to the breakdown of Henri and Marie-Therese's marriage.

It seems that alot of the time that those children/adults who have special challenges are the most friendly and kind people that you can ever meet.


Henri and Marie Therese - can you explain?

Austria 05-17-2009 01:22 AM

Braganza family - dyslexia?
 
Under the category of "Royals with Disabilities":

Did dyslexia affect the Braganza family line? If so, do you know which line or which person(s)?

Thank you in advance.

Iluvbertie 05-17-2009 03:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by COUNTESS (Post 768399)

Royals who were handicapped, particularly mentally handicapped, if they were in position to inherit, were often forced to abdicate. I remember a British prince who was forced to abdicate (this was a long time ago, a very long time ago, and I don't remember who)


England has only a few abdications - Richard II who was deposed and thus forcibly abdicated, Henry VI and Edward IV kept overthrowing each other and forcing the other to 'abdicate' and although Henry seems to have some mental disability he regained the throne a couple of times as well. James II and VII also 'abdicated' but really was deposed by parliament.

The only true abdication in English/British history I can find (and I know virtually nothing about Scottish kings pre 1603 as they have no interest for me - lovely country to visit but its history has never interested me) is Edward VIII. The others were because they were deposed by a stronger king who usually killed them on taking the throne (except Edward IV who didn't do so and had to then fight to keep his throne and then to regain it).

Lalla Meriem 05-17-2009 09:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Benjamin (Post 454128)
You're probably very correct about the impact on the family. I wouldn't be surprised if it didn't contribute somewhat to the breakdown of Henri and Marie-Therese's marriage.

Henri and Maria Theresa of Luxembourg? None of their children are disabled. I suppose it's possible that Prince Sébastian's Poliosis (his blond patch) is caused by a disorder but he appears fine and is not mentally or physically disabled. And, unless you consider being exceptionally attractive a disability none of the other members of the family are disabled, either. ;)

espejor 05-17-2009 10:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little_star (Post 453877)
I'm not sure if people would count it as a disability per se, although I know it's classed as a learning disaility, but doesn't Princess Beatrice suffer from dyslexia?

King Carlos Gustavo of Sweden suffers too dyslexia.

Regards!

PrincessElena 05-18-2009 04:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lalla Meriem (Post 939469)
Henri and Maria Theresa of Luxembourg?

No. Henri and Marie Therese d'Orleans. Their eldest son, Francois and youngest daughter, Blanche are severely disabled.

Lalla Meriem 05-18-2009 07:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PrincessElena (Post 939989)
No. Henri and Marie Therese d'Orleans. Their eldest son, Francois and youngest daughter, Blanche are severely disabled.

Oh, thanks for setting me straight.

Austria 06-16-2009 11:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Austria (Post 939369)
Under the category of "Royals with Disabilities":

Did dyslexia affect the Braganza family line? If so, do you know which line or which person(s)?

Thank you in advance.

Can this information be verified?:
The House of Braganza (/Braganca) was part of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha.
Is that the same "Gotha" genetic line as the British Royal Family (with dyslexia)? With all of the branch variations, is there a more specific name to this line? I believe the British Royal family married into the Swedish Royal family who also have dyslexia. Didn't the British family claim the dyslexia (or was that "only" hemophelia) came from the Saxe-Coburg & Gotha line? I would be happy for any clarification. Thank you.

MAfan 06-17-2009 03:13 AM

But now the Braganzas are not descendsnts of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha...

Austria 07-20-2009 06:12 PM

Braganza / Braganca descendants of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha line
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MAfan (Post 954294)
But now the Braganzas are not descendsnts of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha...

Could anyone inform us of who the first and last descendants were for the Braganzas being connected to the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha lines? Thank you in advance.

Austria 07-20-2009 06:25 PM

Henri & Marie Therese d'Orleans - dyslexia in family?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PrincessElena (Post 939989)
No. Henri and Marie Therese d'Orleans. Their eldest son, Francois and youngest daughter, Blanche are severely disabled.

Is their disability "dyslexia" or might they have something else? Regards.

MAfan 07-20-2009 06:39 PM

The first SCG connected to the Braganzas was Prince Ferdinand, husband of Queen Maria II of Portugal; their Braganzas descendants ended with King Manuel II, in 1932.
The present Braganzas are descendants from an uncle of Queen Maria II, and are not related with the SCG.

MAfan 07-20-2009 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Austria (Post 968745)
Is their disability "dyslexia" or might they have something else? Regards.

No, their problem is related to the Toxoplasmosis their mother had during their pregnancies.

jonnydep 07-20-2009 07:59 PM

they are related
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MAfan (Post 968752)
The present Braganzas are descendants from an uncle of Queen Maria II, and are not related with the SCG.

mafan,
the present head of the portuguese royal family, duarte pio born 1945 (via his mother maria francisca of brazil) is a descendant of victoire of saxe coburg gotha 1822-1857, a daugther of duke ferdinand 1785-1851. victoire is the sister of ferdinand 1816-1885, king consort of portugal, the husband of queen maria II (the great grandparents of king manuel II) !!!

victorie -
gaston, count of eu -
pedro, prince of brazil -
maria francisca -
duarte pio.

cheers jonny :flowers:

Austria 07-20-2009 09:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jonnydep (Post 968773)
mafan,
the present head of the portuguese royal family, duarte pio born 1945 (via his mother maria francisca of brazil) is a descendant of victoire of saxe coburg gotha 1822-1857, a daugther of duke ferdinand 1785-1851. victoire is the sister of ferdinand 1816-1885, king consort of portugal, the husband of queen maria II (the great grandparents of king manuel II) !!!

victorie -
gaston, count of eu -
pedro, prince of brazil -
maria francisca -
duarte pio.

cheers jonny :flowers:

Dear Jonny Dep:
Wow - you are well informed! Thank you for a very complete and accurate answer letting us know the Braganza RF is currently descended from the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha family via Victoire (Victoria)). By chance, with respect, as many royal families have dyslexia, might that have affected the Braganza Royal Family also? Thank you in advance. Regards. :)

Austria 07-20-2009 10:19 PM

Mad King Ludwig II of Bavaria -- dyslexic??
 
Mad King Ludwig II of Bavaria: I was wondering... Is it possible King Ludwig II could have been dyslexic? He is known as the Fairy Tale King, the Swan King, quite introverted, very artistic, loved beauty, romance, architecture, swans, Wagner and very fiscally irresponsible -- and not interested in politics and economics -- one could say not overly academic. Could it be possible he was "dyslexic" whereby creativity, artistic and music endeavors were much easier for him? Just a thought. What do you think? Thanks in advance.

MAfan 07-21-2009 03:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jonnydep (Post 968773)
mafan,
the present head of the portuguese royal family, duarte pio born 1945 (via his mother maria francisca of brazil) is a descendant of victoire of saxe coburg gotha 1822-1857, a daugther of duke ferdinand 1785-1851. victoire is the sister of ferdinand 1816-1885, king consort of portugal, the husband of queen maria II (the great grandparents of king manuel II) !!!

victorie -
gaston, count of eu -
pedro, prince of brazil -
maria francisca -
duarte pio.

cheers jonny :flowers:

Yes, you're right, every time I forgot they descend from Victoria!
Thank you for remembering me it!

jonnydep 07-21-2009 06:09 AM

yes the same family
 
Quote:

The House of Braganza (/Braganca) was part of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha.
Is that the same "Gotha" genetic line as the British Royal Family ?.
yes, it is the same family, ferdinand the father of victorie and ferdinand of portugal, is a uncle of both queen victoria and her husband albert the prince consort......:smile:

Kruununprinsessa 05-22-2012 07:31 PM

Royals with Special Needs
 
I work in a preschool for children with mental and physical handicapabilities (yes, it is as cute as it sounds!), and with all the royal christenings going on this week, I got to thinking: What if a royal were to have a child with special needs? How would it affect their succession?

What if (for example) Princess Estelle had been born with Downs Syndrome? Or autism? As the first-born, would this affect her ability to one day become queen? What if Victoria and Daniel were to then have a "normal" second child; would this child take Estelle's place?

I'm only using Sweden as an example. What about other monarchies in the world? I know they all have their own rules, and I also know that the functions of special needs individuals has major variation on a case-by-case basis. I'm just generalizing here!

I'm aware of royals with obvious special needs in the past (Hello, Charles II of Spain), but my question is about modern-day royals.

Sorry I'm so long-winded! I'm just very curious. Thanks for your time!
-Kruununprinsessa :)

Daria_S 05-22-2012 08:01 PM

Hi. I'm a special education teacher as well (only my certification is in blindness and visual impairment), and I sometimes wondered the same thing. However, I'd like to think that in our day and age parents won't exclude a child from succession just because he/she has special needs. Nowadays monarchs are not involved with politics, but are ceremonial heads of state (at least in Europe), so I don't see why a person with Down Syndrome, Autism, cerebral palsy, visual impairment, etc. won't be able to perform the duties, with assistance when and if necessary.

COUNTESS 05-22-2012 08:04 PM

I would think it would involve the severity of the impairment. They still are the public images for the nation. Sort of a PR person for many thing. They attend openeing of things and make speeches. So, it would depend on how that could be handled.

Kruununprinsessa 05-22-2012 08:12 PM

I had always assumed as much... I think you are right, Daria, in this day and age it wouldn't matter as much as far as the whole "ceremonial figurehead" thing is concerned. Thanks for the input! :)

Muhler 05-23-2012 01:53 AM

In Denmark the heir has to sign a pledge to obey the Constitution and that means the heir has to understand what he/she is signing, what that entails and be able to comprehend the concept of the Constitution.
Because the Monarch here in DK is a part of the legislative process. I.e. signing laws for them to be valid, chairing regular state councils, appointing ministers and entire governments and so on.
In short the heir has to be "of sound mind".

So the Parliament would in all likelyhood bypass an heir, who is unable to or has very big problems fulfilling his/functions. Alternatively someone will act as regent and the heir would be de facto bypassed.

Madame Royale 05-23-2012 02:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daria_S (Post 1417499)
Hi. I'm a special education teacher as well (only my certification is in blindness and visual impairment), and I sometimes wondered the same thing. However, I'd like to think that in our day and age parents won't exclude a child from succession just because he/she has special needs. Nowadays monarchs are not involved with politics, but are ceremonial heads of state (at least in Europe), so I don't see why a person with Down Syndrome, Autism, cerebral palsy, visual impairment, etc. won't be able to perform the duties, with assistance when and if necessary.

On the subject of trisomy 21 (down syndrome) I think there must be certain considerations that would need to take place if an heir were to be born with the said chromosomal abnormality.

Fine and gross motor skill delay can interfere with cognitive development and congenital heart disease has risen significantly in relation to new borns (at around 50%).

Also fertility rates amongst people with down syndrom is significantly low with many males being unable to father children and women displaying low numbers for successful conception rates. As Europe's monarchies exist with a fundamental aim to be inherited, pressumably, by the child/children of the monarch this of course makes the likeliness of it very difficult and would place a great deal of stress upon that person and indeed the wider family.

The possiblility for an early onset of Alzheimers is also believed to be increased for people with trisomy 21. This occuring at an earlier stage of life than as is usually seen with most other people. Also there is an increased risk of developing epilepsy throughout childhood and adulthood.

Furthermore, the temperament of peoples with trisomy 21 often leads to behaviours of concern which often requires direct and consistent supervision. There are triggers which to us may not even appear as existant, but they are there and when evoked, it can cause a great deal of stress and anxiety for that person and those around them.

The fact of the matter is is that the broader picture needs to be taken into consideration.The person themselves need to become the priority above all else. Why place someone in such a demanding and relentless position of responnsbility when they could live a secure lifestyle, with the appropriate support networks and never have to want for anything. By no means does this suggest that they could not or should not hold a public profile alongside the rest of their family and undertake verious representative roles and patronages, but at least the burden of responsibility would not be so burdensome and kept at a minimal. Being the sibling of a King or Queen would come with more than enough responsibility.

It's about recognising the situation for what it is and in that, doing what can (and should) be done to assist and empower the indavidual to live as normal and comfortable life as is possible. The pressures of state and community expectations for a head of state would be a significant encumbrance.

fandesacs2003 05-23-2012 03:07 AM

Very interesting thread!! Bravo

Is think reply is very different according to the country, and the type and level if problem. For a mental problem, IMO it would be easier to give a clear solution, because mental incapacity implies directly the degree of understanding the function.
But what about a physical problem?? In the past such persons were eliminated from their rights, but now? I read that King Juan Carlos uncle, was deaph, and he lost his rights. Would it happen now?
I think one of Queen's Beatrix sisters is blind? What if she was the older? Being blind does not reduce your incapacity to live in the modern word, so why not being a modern Queen??

PetraHel 05-23-2012 05:56 AM

I think that being physically handicapped wouldn´t necesserily have to mean that one has to renounce his/her title to the throne. It would depend on the condition of the person. However, one thing is that modern countries can integrate such people well, the second is if the person would be eager to fulfil such a demanding role beside his/her health issues.
I have a colleague with multiple sclerosis, she is in a wheelchair. It costs her a lot of strenght to fulfill her job, even though she has just a part time. She is more tired, takes a lot of medication... It is not easy at all.
Mental handicap rules out the posibility to be a successor of the throne. Not only is the person unable tu fulfil the duties, moreover could be influenced by bad people, who would use her/him just like a puppet for their own intentions.
We can see it in the Orleans family, where the oldest Francois, being mentally handicapped, has been replaced as a succesor by his younger brother Jean, Duke of Vendome.
I understand that people are happy about the progress handicapped people can do being treated properly, but we have to stay realistic.

Iluvbertie 05-23-2012 06:17 AM

This is interesting but I do think that the respective parliaments wouldn't actually legislate to strip this child of their rights but that the next in line would become regent - the same as if the monarch were to be incapcitated at a later date.

e.g. in Denmark if Margrethe had a bad stroke and couldn't give speeches or sign stuff Fred would simply have to step up and do it as Regent - same with Charles in Britain etc as happened when George III was declared insane.

fandesacs2003 05-23-2012 06:42 AM

KIng Alexander from Greece died very young from septicaemia, because he was beaten by his monkey. At one stage of his illness, doctors proposed to ampute his leg, in order to save his life, but apparently his entourage refused because it was "unacceptable" to be a King with one leg! We know the end of the story.
This is to show how was at this time the mentality!!!! Even a physical handicap was not accepted. Hopefully now minds have changed!!
Personally I believe that in the modern monarchies, like Denmark or Sweden, a relative physical handicap would be accepted.
Germany has a Minister in wheelchair, it does not provoke any problem!!

PetraHel 05-23-2012 06:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iluvbertie (Post 1417710)
This is interesting but I do think that the respective parliaments wouldn't actually legislate to strip this child of their rights but that the next in line would become regent - the same as if the monarch were to be incapcitated at a later date.

e.g. in Denmark if Margrethe had a bad stroke and couldn't give speeches or sign stuff Fred would simply have to step up and do it as Regent - same with Charles in Britain etc as happened when George III was declared insane.

I see the difference here, because your examples are existing monarchs who are/were healthy and capable of doing their job. Regency is just a replacement in the time of their indiciposition. It should be temporary. But in the case of mentally handicapped successor who will never be able to fulfil the job the regent would be permanent. I don´t see the sense of this permanent regency.

fandesacs2003 05-23-2012 07:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PetraHel (Post 1417718)
I see the difference here, because your examples are existing monarchs who are/were healthy and capable of doing their job. Regency is just a replacement in the time of their indiciposition. It should be temporary. But in the case of mentally handicapped successor who will never be able to fulfil the job the regent would be permanent. I don´t see the sense of this permanent regency.

Good point!. I think in this case, the person automatically looses his rights, before acceeding to the throne. They know before that he/is unable and the replace. Consequently, he/she never becomes the heir!

Meraude 05-23-2012 06:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fandesacs2003 (Post 1417736)
Good point!. I think in this case, the person automatically looses his rights, before acceeding to the throne. They know before that he/is unable and the replace. Consequently, he/she never becomes the heir!

Well, a royal heir is a royal heir from birth, whether s/he is first or fifth in line. There have been at least one, if not two Swedish princes that can be said to have had "special needs", prince Erik, son of Gustav V, had epilepsy and a mild retardation, Prince Erik, Duke of Västmanland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and prince August, son of Oscar I, Prince August, Duke of Dalarna - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia , had what can be described as "limited intelligence" and neither of them was removed from the line of succession. As both of them were the youngest sons, the likelihood of either of them inheriting the throne was slim.

nascarlucy 05-23-2012 07:38 PM

If a monarch or heir to the throne was born with physical challenges and had a sharp mind and had average or above average intelligence, then I don't see why their succession to the throne would be in question. Having a physical disability doesn't mean that you are incapable of being a King or Queen.

People who have physical disabilities can have children, depending on the severity of it. If they can't have children the normal way, medical science can help that process.

If the royal had serious mental challenges and couldn't understand simple commands or tasks, then the next person in line would be the heir. I heard a few royals who are Kings or Queens made it known to others that as long as they aren't mentally ill or incapciatated, they should be allowed to reign for life. This seems to be very clearly defined.

What isn't clearly defined is when someone is in a coma for a long period of time or suffering severe brain injury. Years ago these types of injuries usually resulted in death. Medical advances have changed that.

Because of medical advances people can survived for years in a coma like state. If a monarch or heir to the throne due to accident or illness went into a coma and after a year or two they still were in a coma, then what would happen. Or if 5 years later, they came out of the coma and recovered enough that their mind was functioning at a normal level.

This would be a real interesting one. A monarch gets the flu and ends up in a coma unexpectedly. The monarch has several children. The monarch is in a coma for about a year. It's decided short thereafter, then that the eldest child takes the throne. Shortly after taking the throne, the monarch comes out of the coma and within a year is almost back to normal as far as intelligence and thinking goes.

Grandduchess24 05-23-2012 08:12 PM

King Juan Carlos I's uncle was deaf/ mute and physically handicapped.

Meraude 05-23-2012 09:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nascarlucy (Post 1418183)
This would be a real interesting one. A monarch gets the flu and ends up in a coma unexpectedly. The monarch has several children. The monarch is in a coma for about a year. It's decided short thereafter, then that the eldest child takes the throne. Shortly after taking the throne, the monarch comes out of the coma and within a year is almost back to normal as far as intelligence and thinking goes.

I seriously doubt that a monarch would be deposed if s/he ended up in a coma. The monarch would continue being the monarch while his/her eldest child or, if the child is a minor, a member of the royal family would be appointed regent and take over the duties of the monarch. Karl XIV Johan of Sweden was functioning as a regent from 1811 until the death of Carl XIII in 1818.

The most wellknown royal regent was the future king George IV of the United Kingdom during his father's illness (George III), from 1811 until 1820. He was known as HRH The Prince Regent during this time and the period is known as the Regency Era: British Regency - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Anyone who have read a number of romantic historical novels are familiar with the Regency Era, as it's one of the most favoured settings for such novels.

Muhler 05-24-2012 05:35 AM

I think that an heir with a fairly uncomplicated physical disabliity. I.e. semi paralyzed, blind, deaf and so on, would have no problem becoming a monarch.
I actually believe he/she would be seen as a role model.

An heir with a severe mental handicap, would almost certainly be bypassed in Denmark. There is no point in having a regent for decade after decade.

A monarch would almost certainly be represented by a regent, until the monarch dies.
There is a big difference in being a monarch and an heir, let alone an heir who is a minor.

kathia_sophia 05-24-2012 09:13 AM

nowadays an heir with physical disabilities would not loose his/her rights to succeed the throne, because he/she can perform royal duties (with great care for his/her health) and bear children, even if is born with reprodutive problems he/she can become monarch and be succeed by nephew/niece or brother/sister. the same goes for the monarch.

now mental disabilities is another talk. it is very dificult subject depending on the level of mental capablity. but if it is severe, in case an heir is born with this health issues, he/she would be replaced by a younger brother/sister they might have later. in case of a monarch to suffer mental issues later while ruling, and depending on each country and its constitution, the ruling monarch will still be king/queen until his/her death while the Regent will perform the monarch's duty.

all this in Europe, because in other monarchies such as middle east they would probably take other meanusers.

Iluvbertie 05-24-2012 09:59 AM

To remove an heir for any reason will require legislation which means actually passing a law to say xxxx can't be king/queen because they have yyyy disability and then have the present monarch sign that legislation. That means debates in parliament and the spectre of discrimination.

Much easier to have them become monarch with the next in line as the regent for the length of their reign just as if they had become incapacitated after becoming monarch.

The other issue is - what if the have xxxx disability at age 18 and the legislation is passed to remove them from the line of succession but then at age 35 a cure for that disability is found - do they then repeal the previous legislation - what if they have already missed out on being monarch?

Too many cans of worms opened to remove them when it would be simply easier to have a regent act for them.

Muhler 05-24-2012 11:05 AM

In that case, too bad.

I disagree with you. Bypassing an heir isn't that big a deal, and the parliaments will do it, if need be. - Probably with an overwhelming consent by the people.
It happened in Denmark in 1953. A change in the Constitution and Law of Succession meant that the heir was replaced. In this case Princess Margrethe was appointed the successor.
It happened later on in Sweden. As we all know, Victoria was not supposed to have become Crown Princess.

- In these two cases neither of the original heirs had handicaps.
The Parliaments, I believe, would have little qualms of doing what would be seen as the necessary and most practical thing to do. Not least by the people.

What if-cures/scenarios are of little interest to the general public.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iluvbertie (Post 1418427)
To remove an heir for any reason will require legislation which means actually passing a law to say xxxx can't be king/queen because they have yyyy disability and then have the present monarch sign that legislation. That means debates in parliament and the spectre of discrimination.

Much easier to have them become monarch with the next in line as the regent for the length of their reign just as if they had become incapacitated after becoming monarch.

The other issue is - what if the have xxxx disability at age 18 and the legislation is passed to remove them from the line of succession but then at age 35 a cure for that disability is found - do they then repeal the previous legislation - what if they have already missed out on being monarch?

Too many cans of worms opened to remove them when it would be simply easier to have a regent act for them.


nascarlucy 05-25-2012 09:12 PM

Since attitudes and opinions have changed greatly over the last several decades regarding people with physical and mental challenges, I believe that a monarch or heir to the throne who had physical challenges would be admired and looked upon as a role models for others. This would be very true especially if someone was going through the same issues that they were or had a family member who was going through the same thing.

The same would be true if they had some mental challenges and were able to overcome them. Unlike centuries or decades ago, they wouldn't be hidden from view or locked away somewhere like many individuals were.

Daria_S 05-25-2012 11:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nascarlucy (Post 1419293)
Since attitudes and opinions have changed greatly over the last several decades regarding people with physical and mental challenges, I believe that a monarch or heir to the throne who had physical challenges would be admired and looked upon as a role models for others. This would be very true especially if someone was going through the same issues that they were or had a family member who was going through the same thing.

The same would be true if they had some mental challenges and were able to overcome them. Unlike centuries or decades ago, they wouldn't be hidden from view or locked away somewhere like many individuals were.

I agree with you, and hope that if something like this did happen, people would keep an open mind and allow the person to shine. However, sometimes it's all about appearances, and if the monarchy is dependent on a particular country's parliament/central government, it may be a bit more complicated than that. Sometimes politics is about looking good and having the world view your nation as a source of strength and power. We know pretty darn well that some don't view people with special needs as human beings that have strengths, weaknesses, capabilities, etc., and if someone like that is in power, he may very well make sure that the current monarch signs some ridiculous piece of legislature that will change the law of succession, thus banning the heir with a particular exceptionality from ever getting to the throne. It's sick, I know, and I don't agree with it at all, but unfortunately, it is the world we all live in. I see it at schools, when children with special needs are kept away from their typically developing peers, and the sad thing is, it's not because of some law (we know the law saw just the opposite), but because of the culture of the school and the attitude of the principal (actually, I should say the culture of the school that is not portrayed by the mission statement).

Meraude 05-26-2012 02:07 AM

Whether a person with a mental handicap would be able to function as a monarch or not depends very much on what role a monarch have in his/her country. For example if the monarch are supposed to sign new laws and perhaps to advice the prime minister it would be quite difficult to have a monarch who would not be able to understand the laws s/he was to sign or give advice to a prime minister. Take for example the British monarchy, I doubt that a person with mental challenges would be able to perform the duties queen Elizabeth have now. The same is true when it comes to the monarchies in the Middle East where the monarch have a strong political role.

As for a country like Sweden where the monarchy have a rather weak support, the possibility of a mentally handicapped monarch could very well be seen as a reason to change the constitution and become a republic instead.

XeniaCasaraghi 05-26-2012 06:36 AM

Physical disability is one thing, mental disability is another. Depending on the severity I would think that a child with certain mental disabilities would be passed over for monarch but would still be a member of the RF and could possibly take on some kinds of duties. I see no problem with a monarch with physical disabilities, though people would have to get used to such a change occurring. I don't know all the different roles certain monarchs in certain countries have to take.
In the Middle East Im sure such a scenario would be a huge NO
In Leichenstein (sp) and Monaco the Prince has a serious role to play in the country and it's laws so I would think that would be another No.
In England I know the Queen calls on the PM to form a government but that seems like a formality more than anything, I'm probably wrong about that.
I do not know how the Swedish, Denmark, or Netherlands work.
And for some reason in the case of Japan I think people wouldn't even k ow the Emperor had a mental disability because it would be kept a secret.
I don't know if this has any affect on the conversation, but I know of at least 2 presidents who were physically disabled and they went through a lot of trouble to keep it quiet.

nascarlucy 05-27-2012 08:23 AM

Sometimes physical challenges aren't always evident (especially if it's a mild case or if it's something that comes and goes). If a monarch or an heir to the throne had a physical challenge that fits into this category, my guess is that it would be kept a secret from the public as much as possible.

Princess Peach 05-27-2012 08:51 AM

Great thread!!!

It must be kept in mind that all disabilities are on a spectrum of severity. Let's take autisim for example, which is among the most prevalent. It is a spectrum. It ranges from quite mild cases where the child/person has full intellectual capabilities and some mild sensory integration dysfunction to those cases where the child/person has intellectual disabilities, massive, intrusive sensory disabilities, and it is just unfair, to both public AND the disabled individual, or impossible for that person to assume the role of monarch.

I think it would depend on the severity of the disability and the role that particular monarch is expected to play. I do believe that in the European monarchies, which are the ones that I follow, they would try as much as possible to allow that child to assume the role, and to change the role to the extent feasible in order to accommodate him/her (within constitutional boundaries). I personally think it would bring great recognition and public awareness to those special needs people in our society, and I think that the particular country would be very proud of this individual monarch.

Let's face it. It's not a matter of "if", it's a matter of "when," even if that when is 250 years from now.

Danishla 05-27-2012 12:57 PM

I love this thread and I know we are talking about serius disability here but I wanted to bring up the example of Princess Victoria dyslexia which she made public, and I feel it was so edifying and an example to people who suffer from a similar condition. So, yes I believe that public recognition elevates and humanizes their positions in society in a very special way.
BBC NEWS | Europe | Swedish princess reveals bullying secret

Princess Peach 05-27-2012 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Danishla (Post 1419891)
I love this thread and I know we are talking about serius disability here but I wanted to bring up the example of Princess Victoria dyslexia which she made public, and I feel it was so edifying and an example to people who suffer from a similar condition. So, yes I believe that public recognition elevates and humanizes their positions in society in a very special way.
BBC NEWS | Europe | Swedish princess reveals bullying secret

I admire Victoria for coming forward with that, and also for coming forward with her food disorder issues. Princess Beatrice is also dyslexic.

I'd go one step further and say I applaud anyone in the public eye who comes forward with a revelation of a disability, a disorder, an addiction, etc, etc, etc. It does help to humanize the condition and to remove some of the stigmas that surround them.


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