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-   -   George III (1738-1820) and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (1744-1818) (https://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/f165/george-iii-1738-1820-and-charlotte-of-mecklenburg-strelitz-1744-1818-a-6572.html)

Furienna 09-14-2014 06:33 AM

Wow, that was the first time I heard about that! I guess it wouldn't matter now, as such a long time has passed. But it would be interesting if someone was allowed to look at those documents.

Curryong 11-11-2014 07:08 AM

King George III was the first British monarch to have been taught physics, chemistry, botany and astronomy. Later he became a renowned bibliophile. He had over 67,000 books, many of them rare, on every conceivable subject. Scholars like Dr Johnson and Dr Joseph Priestley were welcome to study in the library at the Queen's House or Buckingham House (later Palace.)

Blog Real 05-02-2018 01:17 PM

George III - The Genius of The Mad King
Next Wednesday
20:00
BBC FOUR

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08cwqx3

Denville 05-18-2018 12:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Curryong (Post 1702373)
The future King George III is alleged to have married secretly, on 17th April 1759, a Quaker, Hannah Lightfoot, the daughter of a Wapping shoemaker, who is said to have borne him three children.

Documents relating to this marriage, which bore the Prince's signature, were impounded and examined in 1866 by the Attorney General. Learned opinion at the time leaned to the view that the documents were genuine.

They were placed in the Royal Archives at Windsor. Permission to view them by a would-be author was refused in 1910, and no outsider has seen them since.

If the future King George III did make such a marriage it would have been legal as it was before the Royal Marriages Act (1772.) Therefore, his marriage to Princess Charlotte in 1761 was bigamous.

Page 286. 'Britain's Royal Families: The Complete Genealogy'. Alison Weir. 2002.

its possible thtat Hannah Ligthfoot had died.. however I just find it hard to believe that the very dutiful George would make a marriage that he knew was not acceptable....

Countessmeout 05-18-2018 01:40 AM

The story of Hannah has a lot of holes, if she ever even knew George III. Hannah was married in 1753 to a man named Isaac Ashford. Isaac later remarried in 1759 saying he was a widower. Her mother left Hannah in her will, and died in 1760, but it was said she had not heard from her daughter in 2 years at the time.

Even if George had a relationship with Hannah, she was already married. Any reported marriage to Hannah would have been bigamous on her part.

More found here about the speculation

https://englishhistoryauthors.blogsp...quakeress.html

Elaine Lee 06-22-2018 11:59 AM

Queen Sophia Charlotte, the Caregiver
 
Queen Sophia Charlotte was a wonderful caregiver to King George III. As a mother of 13 children, a wife, an Abolitionist, a Botanist, a musician and more...this strong woman loved and cared for her husband and he went through his traumas.

To bad Queen Charlotte is downplayed in history. However, there is a new book titled, "Invisible Queen: Mixed Ancestry Revealed. Queen Sophia Charlotte. There is a link that tells more on Facebook at Invisible Queen. Interesting story.

Video with more information
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkxwRUbqjRs&t=194s

Thanks,

Elaine Lee

eya 08-09-2018 05:34 AM

Queen Charlotte is being remembered by the State of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Mecklenburgische Seenplatte District with the issuing of a commemorative coin to mark 200 years since her death.

https://www.welt.de/img/regionales/m...ge-4-3-jpg.jpg
https://3.t.cdn.belga.be/belgaimage:...8a6&m=lnokngao

On the 200th anniversary of her death, a celebration of the life of Queen Charlotte was held at the Mirow Palace.

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DsNxxeyXQAATESz.jpg
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DsNxxexXgAAx4hU.jpg
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DsNxxexWsAE93Xk.jpg

https://twitter.com/i/status/1063819397524008960

Dman 09-10-2018 10:13 PM

I would like to see a movie or a series on Queen Charlotte. She’s rarely ever talked about.

Denville 09-11-2018 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Elaine Lee (Post 2125992)
Queen Sophia Charlotte was a wonderful caregiver to King George III. As a mother of 13 children, a wife, an Abolitionist, a Botanist, a musician and more...this strong woman loved and cared for her husband and he went through his traumas.

To
Video with more information
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkxwRUbqjRs&t=194s

Thanks,

Elaine Lee

That's not my impression from what I've read about her.. She became afraid of the King when he became ill and irrational.. and tried to avoid him...

Gawin 09-11-2018 06:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Elaine Lee (Post 2125992)
Queen Sophia Charlotte was a wonderful caregiver to King George III. As a mother of 13 children, a wife, an Abolitionist, a Botanist, a musician and more...this strong woman loved and cared for her husband and he went through his traumas.

To bad Queen Charlotte is downplayed in history. However, there is a new book titled, "Invisible Queen: Mixed Ancestry Revealed. Queen Sophia Charlotte. There is a link that tells more on Facebook at Invisible Queen. Interesting story.

Video with more information
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkxwRUbqjRs&t=194s

Thanks,

Elaine Lee

According to some genealogists the claim that Queen Charlotte had black ancestry through her distant ancestor Margarita de Castro y Sousa is based on insufficient evidence.

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!to...al/QjZyAu3PDI0

I should also point out that Charlotte wasn't Margarita's only royal descendant. She was also the ancestor of Queen Caroline (wife of George II), Catherine the Great of Russia, and Empress Maria Theresa of Austria. So even if Margarita were black Caroline was Britain's first queen with black ancestry, not Charlotte.

Denville 09-12-2018 12:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Countessmeout (Post 2109462)
The story of Hannah has a lot of holes, if she ever even knew George III. Hannah was married in 1753 to a man named Isaac Ashford. Isaac later remarried in 1759 saying he was a widower. Her mother left Hannah in her will, and died in 1760, but it was said she had not heard from her daughter in 2 years at the time.

Even if George had a relationship with Hannah, she was already married. Any reported marriage to Hannah would have been bigamous on her part.

More found here about the speculation

https://englishhistoryauthors.blogsp...quakeress.html

Maybe Hannah did just disappear from her marriage and her husband said she was dead and he was free to remarry.. But I doubt if she and George were married in any way. I can't see him going in for a bigamous marriage or marryring someone that he knew would not be accepted as his queen...

Lucy63 11-17-2018 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Curryong (Post 1719007)
King George III was the first British monarch to have been taught physics, chemistry, botany and astronomy. Later he became a renowned bibliophile. He had over 67,000 books, many of them rare, on every conceivable subject. Scholars like Dr Johnson and Dr Joseph Priestley were welcome to study in the library at the Queen's House or Buckingham House (later Palace.)

Have you seen the documentary “George III, The Genius of the Mad King” ? Very good. He was pretty smart and interested in everything in the world. It is a good one. It is on Amazon Prime.

duchessrachel 03-18-2019 03:30 PM

Could someone recommend to me a good book on King George III? I have only read as far back as Queen Victoria. Thanks.

Lucy63 03-18-2019 03:38 PM

A Royal Experiment by Janice Hadlow is excellent, about George, family, illness etc. also Princesses by Flora Fraser...tells story of all of his daughters in detail but also G and C. Very good.

duchessrachel 03-19-2019 11:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lucy63 (Post 2205189)
A Royal Experiment by Janice Hadlow is excellent, about George, family, illness etc. also Princesses by Flora Fraser...tells story of all of his daughters in detail but also G and C. Very good.

Thank you so much!!

duchessrachel 05-18-2019 06:09 PM

I am looking for a biography on King George III and came across these two that look interesting. However, they appear to be the same book with different titles. Here is the first one and here is the second one. What is going on? Thanks.

Curryong 05-18-2019 06:51 PM

I don't know but if I were you I would purchase the second one. I've read it (borrowed it from a friend) and it's superb. A wonderful book.

duchessrachel 05-18-2019 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Curryong (Post 2223083)
I don't know but if I were you I would purchase the second one. I've read it (borrowed it from a friend) and it's superb. A wonderful book.

Thank you. I will get that one.

Denville 05-19-2019 04:06 AM

It is probably the same book...

duchessrachel 05-19-2019 06:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Denville (Post 2223199)
It is probably the same book...

I did a little more looking at the books and the first one I referenced is a reissue by a different publishing company. I wonder if it is because of a different publishing company that the name had to be changed.

CyrilVladisla 11-06-2019 08:24 PM

In August 1761, King George III met Princess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.
https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-in-...-87987015.html

wyevale 01-29-2020 05:58 AM

Today is the 200th anniversary [1820] of the death of the much loved King George lll ['Farmer George'] whose reign is most notably associated with the loss of one particularly pesky North American colony.- but which was really largely the fault of his inept PM [Lord North].

In reality his long reign saw the a massive increase in the prosperity of Britain - astounding industrial & agricultural Revolutions, a vast expansion of a prosperous Middle Class. the beginnings of the anti-slavery movement [1783], and wholly victorious wars against the primary {French} Enemy -1792-1815, giving Great Britain absolute dominance of the World for almost exactly a Century.

Aside from this he was a thoroughly decent Man, a good Father and Husband, wholly unpretentious, and as unlike both his predecessor and successor as he could possibly be..

Durham 01-29-2020 02:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wyevale (Post 2289185)
Today is the 200th anniversary [1820] of the death of the much loved King George lll ['Farmer George'] whose reign is most notably associated with the loss of one particularly pesky North American colony.- but which was really largely the fault of his inept PM [Lord North].

In reality his long reign saw the a massive increase in the prosperity of Britain - astounding industrial & agricultural Revolutions, a vast expansion of a prosperous Middle Class. the beginnings of the anti-slavery movement [1783], and wholly victorious wars against the primary {French} Enemy -1792-1815, giving Great Britain absolute dominance of the World for almost exactly a Century.

Aside from this he was a thoroughly decent Man, a good Father and Husband, wholly unpretentious, and as unlike both his predecessor and successor as he could possibly be..

I wonder what did become of those unfortunate Americans, such a shame for them.......:lol:

More seriously I find George an interesting character. I think his is a possible model for a 21st century monarchy. Personal, unfussy & modest.

An Ard Ri 01-29-2020 03:03 PM

THE Death announcement for H.M.King George III in the GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, London, dated February, 1820!!!

Death of King George III with coffin print... - RareNewspapers.com

Durham 01-29-2020 03:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by An Ard Ri (Post 2289346)
THE Death announcement for H.M.King George III in the GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, London, dated February, 1820!!!

Death of King George III with coffin print... - RareNewspapers.com

Very interesting, thank you.

It's certainly a lot more respectful than the comment in The Times printed after the death of his son George iv:

"there never was an individual less regretted by his fellow creatures than this deceased king"

Certainly puts modern day criticism of royalty into some sort of historical context.

wartenberg7 01-29-2020 03:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Durham (Post 2289351)
Very interesting, thank you.

It's certainly a lot more respectful than the comment in The Times printed after the death of his son George iv:

"there never was an individual less regretted by his fellow creatures than this deceased king"

Certainly puts modern day criticism of royalty into some sort of historical context.

They really could say these things right after the King´s death without ending up in the Tower...;)?! On the other hand they had these unflattering satiric sketches during the reigns of Georges III and IV all the time!
I guess these things would have been quite unheard of in later reigns and things one could say about Royalty and what you could say not, until the late 1960s, became much more strict!

Durham 01-29-2020 05:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wartenberg7 (Post 2289367)
They really could say these things right after the King´s death without ending up in the Tower...;)?! On the other hand they had these unflattering satiric sketches during the reigns of Georges III and IV all the time!
I guess these things would have been quite unheard of in later reigns and things one could say about Royalty and what you could say not, until the late 1960s, became much more strict!

Yes indeed the James Gillray pictures. Wonderful satire!

There has long been a tradition of lese majeste in English/British tradition. Quite healthily so in my opinion.

The near veneration of the aged Victoria & the continuing deep deference well into the twentieth century towards British monarchs is unusual in a historical context. The first cracks began to appear in the fifties with Lord Altricham's waspish criticisms of the young queen.

Durham 02-08-2020 12:01 PM

I came across this interesting account of the visit of George & Charlotte to Lulworth castle in 1789. They went inside the newly built Roman Catholic chapel (2.23 in). An interesting historical incident in post Reformation England. This was only nine years after the infamous Gordon riots.

George is said to have been one of those against Roman Catholic emancipation at the 1800 union with Ireland. I wonder if he was privately tolerant but felt he had to be ultra protestant in public.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oT45xZ8oMOU

Gawin 02-08-2020 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Durham (Post 2289341)
I wonder what did become of those unfortunate Americans, such a shame for them.......:lol:

We are ruled by a mad tyrant..so we have come full circle...and are indeed unfortunate....

Durham 02-08-2020 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gawin (Post 2291848)
We are ruled by a mad tyrant..so we have come full circle...and are indeed unfortunate....

That made me giggle thank you:lol:

Erin9 02-08-2020 04:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Durham (Post 2289351)
Very interesting, thank you.

It's certainly a lot more respectful than the comment in The Times printed after the death of his son George iv:

"there never was an individual less regretted by his fellow creatures than this deceased king"

Certainly puts modern day criticism of royalty into some sort of historical context.



Wow. He was really unpopular.

Denville 02-08-2020 04:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Erin9 (Post 2291923)
Wow. He was really unpopular.

He was a pretty dreadful individual. George III's sons were no prize but George, the heir was one of the worst.

sndral 02-09-2020 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gawin (Post 2291848)
We are ruled by a mad tyrant..so we have come full circle...and are indeed unfortunate....

Gawin I blame you for the coffee I just spewed on my laptop :rofl:

Furienna 03-01-2020 04:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wyevale (Post 2289185)
Today is the 200th anniversary [1820] of the death of the much loved King George lll ['Farmer George'] whose reign is most notably associated with the loss of one particularly pesky North American colony.- but which was really largely the fault of his inept PM [Lord North].

In reality his long reign saw the a massive increase in the prosperity of Britain - astounding industrial & agricultural Revolutions, a vast expansion of a prosperous Middle Class. the beginnings of the anti-slavery movement [1783], and wholly victorious wars against the primary {French} Enemy -1792-1815, giving Great Britain absolute dominance of the World for almost exactly a Century.

Aside from this he was a thoroughly decent Man, a good Father and Husband, wholly unpretentious, and as unlike both his predecessor and successor as he could possibly be..

He is one of my favorites as well. Of course, he had to become crazy. :sad:

Furienna 03-01-2020 04:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gawin (Post 2291848)
We are ruled by a mad tyrant..so we have come full circle...and are indeed unfortunate....

This is not true.

An Ard Ri 03-01-2020 07:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Durham (Post 2291824)
I came across this interesting account of the visit of George & Charlotte to Lulworth castle in 1789. They went inside the newly built Roman Catholic chapel (2.23 in). An interesting historical incident in post Reformation England. This was only nine years after the infamous Gordon riots.

George is said to have been one of those against Roman Catholic emancipation at the 1800 union with Ireland. I wonder if he was privately tolerant but felt he had to be ultra protestant in public.

I wonder how the king King felt about the influx of French Roman Catholics fleeing the French Revolution and religious persecution during the terror.I think surviving members of the Bourbon family stayed at Lulworth castle for a time.

Kataryn 03-01-2020 07:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wyevale (Post 2289185)

Aside from this he was a thoroughly decent Man, a good Father and Husband, wholly unpretentious, and as unlike both his predecessor and successor as he could possibly be..


He was a good brother, too, to his sisters after his own father, Frederick Prince of Wales died. Yes, he looked for "good" marriages for the sake of th Uk but when he was in doubt of the character of the future husband, he secured his sister's dowry for her, so she could use it as she wanted. When his youngest sister Caroline Matilde was imprisonned in Danmark and her husband declared mad after their marriage a trois with their prime minister Count Struensee (both men had fathered a child with Caroline Matilde) had been broken up by a revolution at court led by the king's stepnother Dowager queen Juliane, he managed to get his sister free and her dowry back, so she could live in his Hannoveran lands in peace and richness. The Count alas was executed, the king was treated for his mental health and as soon as Caroline Matilde's eldest, the son by the king,

was at 16 considered old enough to become prince regent, all was settled again. Only Caroline Matilde could not come back to Copenhagen, as she had died before. But her daughter with Count Struensee had been legitimized by her husbund, so could marry as a Roiyal Princess of Denmark. All without doubt because George III. never ceased to care for his sister and her family and pushed the Danish government, even threatening with war till they declared his nephew an adult at 16 and handed over the power.

Durham 03-16-2020 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by An Ard Ri (Post 2297241)
I wonder how the king King felt about the influx of French Roman Catholics fleeing the French Revolution and religious persecution during the terror.I think surviving members of the Bourbon family stayed at Lulworth castle for a time.

After various adventures Louis XVIII arrived in England in 1808. He lived at Hartwell House in Buckinghamshire, paid for by the king.

I would imagine George found the chaos & irreligion troubling. Catholic Bourbon France was a known entity even if it was the traditional foe. The new revolutionary France proved to be far more dangerous & unpredictable & indeed plunged Europe into over two decades of war & upheaval.

CyrilVladisla 03-16-2020 03:35 PM

Do you think that King George III wondered if any of his older children might become interested in the Roman Catholic religion?

An Ard Ri 03-16-2020 03:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Durham (Post 2301582)
After various adventures Louis XVIII arrived in England in 1808. He lived at Hartwell House in Buckinghamshire, paid for by the king.

I would imagine George found the chaos & irreligion troubling. Catholic Bourbon France was a known entity even if it was the traditional foe. The new revolutionary France proved to be far more dangerous & unpredictable & indeed plunged Europe into over two decades of war & upheaval.

Prior to that the last influx of French were the persecuted Huguenots who fled the ultra Catholic Bourbons!

Durham 03-16-2020 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by An Ard Ri (Post 2301602)
Prior to that the last influx of French were the persecuted Huguenots who fled the ultra Catholic Bourbons!

Yes indeed & a very successful group they became in both Britain & Ireland. The Huguenots I think were a socially diverse lot. I would imagine most of the French refugees of the late C18th were aristocrats although I don't have a lot of knowledge about them. Apart from reading the Scarlet Pimpernel!

An Ard Ri 03-16-2020 04:34 PM

I have Huguenot ancestry they settled in Isle of Wight .

I can imagine the fear at the court of George III that the ideals of the French Revolution would make their way across the English Channel.

Durham 03-16-2020 04:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by An Ard Ri (Post 2301607)
I have Huguenot ancestry they settled in Isle of Wight .

I can imagine the fear at the court of George III that the ideals of the French Revolution would make their way across the English Channel.

They were certainly fearful. Radicals like Thomas Paine were threatened with arrest. The Peterloo Massacre, albeit much later, is another example of paranoid government action over political radicalism.

The Americans of course were an example of (North American) Britons who had been inspired by enlightenment ideals.

An Ard Ri 03-16-2020 05:29 PM

During the years during 1791-1794 there was a large scale exodus of clergy,religious and nobility from France escaping the massacres and Terror.

In September 1792 for instance it was reported that 4,000 French émigré landed in the UK.

Countessmeout 03-16-2020 06:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by An Ard Ri (Post 2301621)
During the years during 1791-1794 there was a large scale exodus of clergy,religious and nobility from France escaping the massacres and Terror.

In September 1792 for instance it was reported that 4,000 French émigré landed in the UK.

The exodus of the clergy was spurred by the Civil Constitution of the clergy. It had been created in 1790 but the king forestalled it by refusing to sign. Those priests who did not agree to swear the oath were to be imprisoned. About half the clergy took the oath. Non-jurists as they were called found themselves in chains in prison ships where they ended up dying from conditions. Many of the clergy fled to the UK and other countries to escape prison or having to take it.

In 1792 the September Massacres saw the murder of 1100-1600 prisoners in Paris in a period of 4 days. It was this event that led to the famous murder of Marat in his bath tub (his murdered Charlotte Corday held him to blame for the massacres). 191 of them were Roman catholic clergy who were prisoners at Carmes Prison. 3 bishops, 127 priests, 56 monks and nuns and 5 lay people were killed. October 1926 Pope Pius beatified the group as the Holy September Martyrs.

CyrilVladisla 04-26-2021 07:17 PM

King George III entrusted his tutor, John Stuart, Earl of Bute with the task of finding him a wife among the German Protestant princesses. Bute came up with Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.


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