The Royal Forums

The Royal Forums (https://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/)
-   The Duke and Duchess of Sussex and Family (https://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/f34/)
-   -   Harry and Meghan: Wedding Suggestions and Musings (https://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/f34/harry-and-meghan-wedding-suggestions-and-musings-43846.html)

Mbruno 11-27-2017 12:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HRHHermione (Post 2041507)
There is absolutely no reason to avoid May as a month. Other royal couples have been married in May.

It has been announced that they will marry in the spring of 2018. Since it is unlikely they will marry before Easter and before William's third child is born, I'd say that there is a great chance the wedding will be in May.

Somebody 11-27-2017 12:35 PM

Osipi brought up the interesting question whether Harry will decide to wear a wedding band as well or decide against it (following the lead of his brother). What do you think?

I hope he does but that is more due to personal preference than anything else.

Rudolph 11-27-2017 12:41 PM

Not wearing a wedding band isn’t really William’s lead. The Duke of Edinburgh doesn’t wear one nor do many men of the upper class. Former PM David Cameron doesn’t wear one.

Molly2101 11-27-2017 12:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rudolph (Post 2041727)
Not wearing a wedding band isnít really Williamís lead. The Duke of Edinburgh doesnít wear one nor do many men of the upper class. Former PM David Cameron doesnít wear one.

I'm sure Prince Philip did wear one to begin with though.

jacqui24 11-27-2017 12:44 PM

I think Harry will wear a wedding ring.

Somebody 11-27-2017 12:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rudolph (Post 2041727)
Not wearing a wedding band isn’t really William’s lead. The Duke of Edinburgh doesn’t wear one nor do many men of the upper class. Former PM David Cameron doesn’t wear one.

Interesting. Do you know why? What is the background of this tradition? Did they feel they were 'above' it? Has it any relationship with upper-class men in the past not being frowned upon when not keeping (and sometimes never having the intention to - Charles is an example) their wedding vows?

Edit for clarification: I am not suggesting that anyone following this tradition would do it for the same reasons as when the tradition first started; I am just wondering what started it in the first place.

ROYAL NORWAY 11-27-2017 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rudolph (Post 2041631)
Theresa May's spokesman says "there are no plans for a bank holiday" to celebrate the wedding

More about it:

Richard Palmer @RoyalReporter
Downing Street says Andrew's wedding in 1986 and Edward's in 1999 were not public holidays. But there was a bank holiday for Anne's first wedding in 1973.

I already knew, but thanks to Downing Street and that Palmer guy for telling us.

Nico 11-27-2017 12:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Somebody (Post 2041739)
Interesting. Do you know why? What is the background of this tradition? Did they feel they were 'above' it? Has it any relationship with upper-class men in the past not being frowned upon when not keeping (and sometimes never having the intention to - Charles is an example) their wedding vows?

You're playing a dangerous game with your insinuations.
And it's not the first time ...

Somebody 11-27-2017 01:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nico (Post 2041748)
You're playing a dangerous game with your insinuations.
And it's not the first time ...

I am not trying to suggest that William is unfaithful at all or would like to keep that option open - I probably should have added that I don't think that someone going by that tradition nowadays would do that for the same reasons (and I am not sure what you are referring to with 'not the first time'). I was just wondering about where the tradition comes from? Do you know?

If you talk about my reference to Charles; I was thinking about Charles himself wondering why he should be the first prince of Wales without a mistress. While I do hold him accountable for his behavior during his marriage (as well as any other person who is married); I also feel for him in that he might have felt trapped with all the expectations laid upon him regarding an 'acceptable partner'.

So, for now I am mainly happy that Harry and Meghan found each other and are clearly marrying out of love while also taking their duties seriously. And whether Harry choses to wear a wedding band or not, doesn't change that but it is still an interesting little detail.

duchessrachel 11-27-2017 01:40 PM

I am guessing he will wear a wedding band out of respect that Meghan is American, and most men do in America.

O-H Anglophile 11-27-2017 01:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Somebody (Post 2041816)
I am not trying to suggest that William is unfaithful at all or would like to keep that option open - I probably should have added that I don't think that someone going by that tradition nowadays would do that for the same reasons (and I am not sure what you are referring to with 'not the first time'). I was just wondering about where the tradition comes from? Do you know?

If you talk about my reference to Charles; I was thinking about Charles himself wondering why he should be the first prince of Wales without a mistress. While I do hold him accountable for his behavior during his marriage (as well as any other person who is married); I also feel for him in that he might have felt trapped with all the expectations laid upon him regarding an 'acceptable partner'.

So, for now I am mainly happy that Harry and Meghan found each other and are clearly marrying out of love while also taking their duties seriously. And whether Harry choses to wear a wedding band or not, doesn't change that but it is still an interesting little detail.

But Charles did wear a wedding ring after he married Diana and he does now as well, so I'm not sure what you mean.

Quote:

Originally Posted by duchessrachel (Post 2041817)
I am guessing he will wear a wedding band out of respect that Meghan is American, and most men do in America.

I wouldn't say most, I know many who don't, some because they are in jobs where a ring is dangerous to have one on your finger.

Whether Harry wears a wedding ring or not is his personal decision.

Somebody 11-27-2017 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by O-H Anglophile (Post 2041838)
But Charles did wear a wedding ring after he married Diana and he does now as well, so I'm not sure what you mean.

I was mainly trying to say that it seemed as if fidelity was not seen as an important virtue in the upper class; and as 'not wearing a wedding ring' is apparently quite common among men of the upper class I wondered whether there was a relation.

So far, it seems that nobody knows why especially a large percentage of upper class men do not wear a wedding band in the UK? It could also be because they were so well known in their area that everyone would know that they were married (but that would also apply to their wifes, wouldn't it?). As for William and Harry, whether they wear it or not; everyone will know that they are married (or engaged in the next few months) :whistling:

Sorry, looks like my comment threw the discussion hugely off-topic. I fully agree that it is a personal decision; as long as both Harry and Meghan are fine with whatever the decision might be, that's all what matters.

cepe 11-27-2017 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Somebody (Post 2041816)
I am not trying to suggest that William is unfaithful at all or would like to keep that option open - I probably should have added that I don't think that someone going by that tradition nowadays would do that for the same reasons (and I am not sure what you are referring to with 'not the first time'). I was just wondering about where the tradition comes from? Do you know?

If you talk about my reference to Charles; I was thinking about Charles himself wondering why he should be the first prince of Wales without a mistress. While I do hold him accountable for his behavior during his marriage (as well as any other person who is married); I also feel for him in that he might have felt trapped with all the expectations laid upon him regarding an 'acceptable partner'.

So, for now I am mainly happy that Harry and Meghan found each other and are clearly marrying out of love while also taking their duties seriously. And whether Harry choses to wear a wedding band or not, doesn't change that but it is still an interesting little detail.


In my experience, rings are avoided by people working in the UK military esp handling guns, aircraft controls etc because of the risk of catching. I've been happily married for 30 yrs and my other half (ex military) has never worn one. Applies to other work environments as well.

Also, (looking back) it never used to be the "fashion" for men to wear rings. None of the men in my family did. Became more common from the 90's onwards.

Princess B 11-27-2017 02:21 PM

I think it'll be a mid may - early June wedding.
I also suspect it'll be at St. George's though I wish for the wedding to be in London.

wyevale 11-27-2017 02:22 PM

My father [what used to be called 'landed Gentry'] wears one, as did his father before him...

Somebody 11-27-2017 02:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cepe (Post 2041854)
In my experience, rings are avoided by people working in the UK military esp handling guns, aircraft controls etc because of the risk of catching. I've been happily married for 30 yrs and my other half (ex military) has never worn one. Applies to other work environments as well.

Also, (looking back) it never used to be the "fashion" for men to wear rings. None of the men in my family did. Became more common from the 90's onwards.

Job related makes sense: one of my cousins wears his on a necklace as he is a baker. My father-in-law switched his from right hand (which is customary in the Netherlands) to left hand only a week after his marriage after his ring caught and he hurt his finger quite badly - he never switched back, so for the last almost 40 years my in-laws have worn their wedding band on different hands.

Scotslass 11-27-2017 02:50 PM

Prince Charles did wear a wedding ring. He just wore it on his pinkie like a lot of upper class men do.

French Toast 11-27-2017 02:53 PM

I think a wedding at St Georges Chapel at Windsor in late May would be delightful. St Georges Chapel is so beautiful. Intimate yet grand.

IloveCP 11-27-2017 02:56 PM

I hope they get married in Scotland like Zara.

iisuzieii 11-27-2017 03:07 PM

I personally dont think not wearing a ring is an issue...i dont think he will...he never wears rings now...cant see that suddenly changing...and i dont think it makes a difference bc plenty of women and men who wear rings that are married are unfaithful...its not the ring that keeps them faithful or not...thats the human being and their impulses that do that...

but to get back on track...i think that it will be st georges chapel..and the more i think about it the more i think its gonna be march...right before kate pops...(i do think kate is due early april--like the first week)

hopefully they can relax a bit now...especially harry...he looked so nervous...hes prob relieved that part is over.. But yay for them and their families!!!


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:44 PM.

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2020
Jelsoft Enterprises