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carlota 02-19-2006 05:34 PM

Lessons In Royalty
 
what do you think the new commoner princesses had to learn from her engagement until their wedding? we all know that they had to learn protocol, some of them new languages and history... let's post any general assumptions on what we think their schedules were during the engagement period and their preparation as princesses and particular skills that particular princesses had to gain to be a princess...

to start and to add my two cents, i know princess letizia was taught "aristocratic english" and history of spain. there were rumours on that she took hunt lessons, but that was never confirmed. it was also said that she visited the palaces belonging to the royal house to learn about their facilities and their history and that she had a notebook with her all the time and kept asking the people things to write them down... :) which i thought it was a cute detail and showing a lot of commitment. there was also a little introduction to wines, how to taste them, names and procedences...

of course, she was also taught protocol and i wouldn't be surprised if she had some kind of lesson on international organisations and international politics.

Mathilde1286 02-19-2006 05:40 PM

I think new ones would be taught manners, such as how to stand, walk, hold yourself in public. Also, one would be taught how to take good pictures, how to smile, how to speak - anunciatjion...How to put outfits together (that look nice), how to sit up, how to eat - which utensils are used for what, how to drink and hold their wine - red or white, ettiquete...ah! there are soo many new things for a new princess to learn!! :)

By the way, Carlota, great thread! :)

carlota 02-19-2006 07:23 PM

thanks for the post mathilde! i forgot about those really important things, how to stand, walk, talk in public, greet people...

regardez 02-19-2006 08:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mathilde1286
How to put outfits together (that look nice)

I think they all receive personal stylists so I don't think they need to learn that. But everything else, yes. :)

sara1981 02-19-2006 08:16 PM

what about British Royals? have learn lesson?

janos614 02-19-2006 11:42 PM

She was probably given lessons on how to write proper correspondence, too, and the appropriate response for the occasion, along with what kinds of stationery to use (correspondence cards, letter sheets, etc.). I'm sure she has a secretary to answer her letters for her but in case she has to respond personally, this would be good to know.

Marengo 02-20-2006 05:57 AM

Maxima was tutored by some professors, among them prof. Victor Halberstadt (who was the chairman of one of the bilderberg conferences), mostly about dutch history & society and dutch social and political organs and traditions.
Mrs L. Gaarland, lady in waiting of HM The Queen, who now acompanies Maxima most of the times, probably instructed her on royal customs.

xtan 02-20-2006 07:27 AM

must be so stressful, got to cope with the engagement, new life, new in-laws, the media and the nation!!!!

pollyemma 02-20-2006 09:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xtan
must be so stressful, got to cope with the engagement, new life, new in-laws, the media and the nation!!!!

yeah, only the power of love can get a girl through.

Dennism 02-25-2006 11:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carlota
there were rumours on that she took hunt lessons, but that was never confirmed.

The Countess of Wessex certainly took to this pursuit. She's like Annie Oakley when she has a gun...:D

sheilababe 09-15-2015 06:41 PM

Lessons In Royalty
 
Hello,
I was once looking through some articles about Duchess Kate (new fan here) and I saw that she had taken "princess lessons" where she would be learning about "how the State works" and "learning about organizations such as the arts, the media, and the government."
I highly doubt that was all she learned so I was wondering if anyone knew what a royal would have to study or learn before coming into the position? What are "the arts" in specific she would have to learn? (Is having a degree in art history not enough?)
Thank you

Honeybees 09-15-2015 06:49 PM

The Duchess of Cambridge was reported to have such lessons but I would doubt that they were referred to as Princess school. The arts include more than the visual arts i.e. the dramatic arts and UK legislation may be something she had little prior knowledge of. Britain does not to the best of my knowledge have an abundance of constitutional lawyers.

JR76 09-15-2015 07:01 PM

Lessons In Royalty
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Honeybees (Post 1820489)
The Duchess of Cambridge was reported to have such lessons but I would doubt that they were referred to as Princess school. The arts include more than the visual arts i.e. the dramatic arts and UK legislation may be something she had little prior knowledge of. Britain does not to the best of my knowledge have an abundance of constitutional lawyers.


Not many people seem to really comprehend the intricacies of the British constitution (which in fact really isn't a constitution per se). I've even read a supposed quote made by The Queen somewhere where she admits to find it a bit difficult.


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sarahedwards2 09-15-2015 08:03 PM

In the movie "William and Kate", Kate is given curtsying lessons.


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Honeybees 09-15-2015 08:06 PM

And movies reflect real life? The British Constitution is also largely unwritten, to the best of my knowledge.

cepe 09-15-2015 08:22 PM

Let's get real. No member of the royal family is taught how to curtsey. It isn't important. It's a minor bit of protocol that is fading away. It's trivia

What is important is an understanding of the balance between royal(state role) and government. So meetings which explain that, the relationship between royal and government would take place. Working with the "constitution" is vital. Just image you become a member of the BRf and think what is the priority to learn..

One bad curtsey does not undo a princess, even one by marriage.

Then there is gaining an understanding of the protocols within the BRf. Then of course you could ignore them, but it is necessary to know that's what you are doing. If you gain seniority then your views could have impact.

There is also the need to understand how the Royal Household functions and the impact of changes. The decision to change lies with the Monarch. Same applies to managing budgets.

Stuff like who curtseys to whom seems of no importance to me. What is crucial is the protocol between monarch and government.

And there is no speculation on that, it will be a matter of law

lucymae88 09-15-2015 08:26 PM

I don't think Kate was giving Princess lessons, I think her and other royal brides are probably pulled aside before the wedding and giving tips on what to do an not to do. Like etiquette, protocol's and how to deal with the press. What to wear or not to wear in certain countries and how to address other royal's.

Honeybees 09-15-2015 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cepe (Post 1820515)
Let's get real. No member of the royal family is taught how to curtsey. It isn't important. It's a minor bit of protocol that is fading away. It's trivia

What is important is an understanding of the balance between royal(state role) and government. So meetings which explain that, the relationship between royal and government would take place. Working with the "constitution" is vital. Just image you become a member of the BRf and think what is the priority to learn..

One bad curtsey does not undo a princess, even one by marriage.

Then there is gaining an understanding of the protocols within the BRf. Then of course you could ignore them, but it is necessary to know that's what you are doing. If you gain seniority then your views could have impact.

There is also the need to understand how the Royal Household functions and the impact of changes. The decision to change lies with the Monarch. Same applies to managing budgets.

Stuff like who curtseys to whom seems of no importance to me. What is crucial is the protocol between monarch and government.

And there is no speculation on that, it will be a matter of law

. Did The London Gazette not carry the new protocol as established by H.M regarding who curtseyed to whom and it was picked up by The Daily Fail. If true it would appear curtseying matters to H.M.

Honeybees 09-15-2015 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cepe (Post 1820515)
Let's get real. No member of the royal family is taught how to curtsey. It isn't important. It's a minor bit of protocol that is fading away. It's trivia

What is important is an understanding of the balance between royal(state role) and government. So meetings which explain that, the relationship between royal and government would take place. Working with the "constitution" is vital. Just image you become a member of the BRf and think what is the priority to learn..

One bad curtsey does not undo a princess, even one by marriage.

Then there is gaining an understanding of the protocols within the BRf. Then of course you could ignore them, but it is necessary to know that's what you are doing. If you gain seniority then your views could have impact.

There is also the need to understand how the Royal Household functions and the impact of changes. The decision to change lies with the Monarch. Same applies to managing budgets.

Stuff like who curtseys to whom seems of no importance to me. What is crucial is the protocol between monarch and government.

And there is no speculation on that, it will be a matter of law

Managing Budgets? H.M is getting out a calculator to manage a budget? Seriously!

Pranter 09-15-2015 08:36 PM

I read that Kate had protocol lessons and instruction on how to get in and out of a car without wardrobe issues....how to bend down to talk to someone without flashing etc etc. Those sorts of things.


LaRae

cepe 09-15-2015 08:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Honeybees (Post 1820519)
Managing Budgets? H.M is getting out a calculator to manage a budget? Seriously!

All those that receive funds to undertake their duties have to operate within a budget.

You may sneer, but any royal who doesn't do that and blames staff would not have any respect at all. Ultimately they are responsible.

Furthermore, if you read back, we were discussing Catherine. She and William have to operate within the budget from PoW.

It isn't a spend, spend, spend environment

Honeybees 09-15-2015 08:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cepe (Post 1820524)
All those that receive funds to undertake their duties have to operate within a budget.

You may sneer, but any royal who doesn't do that and blames staff would not have any respect at all. Ultimately they are responsible.

Furthermore, if you read back, we were discussing Catherine. She and William have to operate within the budget from PoW.

It isn't a spend, spend, spend environment

I would not be so rude as to sneer at anyone, ever. I was tickled at the image of H.M with a calculator.

TLLK 09-15-2015 09:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lucymae88 (Post 1820516)
I don't think Kate was giving Princess lessons, I think her and other royal brides are probably pulled aside before the wedding and giving tips on what to do an not to do. Like etiquette, protocol's and how to deal with the press. What to wear or not to wear in certain countries and how to address other royal's.

I would imagine that Daniel and his predecessors: Phillip, Claus, and Henrik also may have received similar information prior to their weddings.

TLLK 09-15-2015 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cepe (Post 1820515)
Let's get real. No member of the royal family is taught how to curtsey. It isn't important. It's a minor bit of protocol that is fading away. It's trivia

What is important is an understanding of the balance between royal(state role) and government. So meetings which explain that, the relationship between royal and government would take place. Working with the "constitution" is vital. Just image you become a member of the BRf and think what is the priority to learn..

One bad curtsey does not undo a princess, even one by marriage.

Then there is gaining an understanding of the protocols within the BRf. Then of course you could ignore them, but it is necessary to know that's what you are doing. If you gain seniority then your views could have impact.

There is also the need to understand how the Royal Household functions and the impact of changes. The decision to change lies with the Monarch. Same applies to managing budgets.

Stuff like who curtseys to whom seems of no importance to me. What is crucial is the protocol between monarch and government.

And there is no speculation on that, it will be a matter of law

:previous:Good post cepe. So often what we see is just a tiny portion of their lives. Today members of the Dutch royal family bowed to their royal standard, listened to the King's speech and greeted crowds on the balcony. What is not visible to us is their personal understanding of how their role is shaped by their constitutions. For a newcomer entering into a royal family that is a critical lesson to learn.

JR76 09-15-2015 10:04 PM

Queen Silvia spent some time in Denmark with her husbands aunt Queen Ingrid and his sister Margareta before her wedding to get prepared for her future role and has later many times stated how big of a support Queen Ingrid was to her both then and later. That said Ingrids top advice to her was "Just be yourself and everything will work out fine".


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Tarlita 09-16-2015 12:40 AM

I would suggest a new addition to a royal family would be taught how to deflect uneasy questions from ignorant type of people at gala functions. How to be witty with HMs guests, how to interact with politicians and others at the many many social & gala events. When I say ignorant, I mean people who may ask an innocent question not knowing they may be insulting for instance.
I would think there would be a lot to learn in how to interact with people showing interest in what they say without being too informal about it. (chummy. for instance.)

LadyFinn 09-16-2015 02:38 AM

The press release from the Royal Court of Sweden:
Induction programme for Mr Daniel Westling - Sveriges Kungahus

MARG 09-16-2015 03:55 AM

:previous: A perfectly logical course, referred to by some in fun (myself included) as 'Prince School'. It makes perfect sense to me the Catherine would also need something, perhaps on a smaller scale because she has time and is married to the heir's heir.

To say it is ridiculous that Catherine would receive lessons in how to curtsey, why not. She'd want to get it right when dealing with the BRF in public and I guess the first public "show" we saw was her wedding curtsey to HM. Since all the royals curtsey in public, at the horse shows, Royal Ascot, etc, it seems to me pretty much of a prerequisite.

Royal Ascot is filled with foreign royalty and it helps to know who's who and show respect when necessary. Zara laments the loss of respect and Autumn, not surprisingly, always pays her respects as do all HM's grandchildren. Not only does Harry bow when required, he takes great joy in tipping his hat and kissing the ladies of the family and some very special friends. So hardly laughable at all.

https://www.google.co.nz/url?sa=t&rc...cYq5monfu1LifA

nascarlucy 09-16-2015 07:32 PM

One would not need to have a college degree to have lessons in royalty. It would be more of an education or observations of the lessons in royalty or certain protocols.

Tarlita 09-19-2015 06:00 PM

Yes having a degree does not teach you how to address the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, when he is standing next to say--the Dowager Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, now referred to I think as Princess Beatrix. Also if King Willem Alexander were standing there as well. Lets say at Royal Ascot or a more formal gala event. So how is Duchess Kate going to correctly greet this group in a proper way. This is the sort of guidance one needs so as not to cause insult.

Honeybees 09-19-2015 06:36 PM

There is no Duchess Kate. There is The Duchess of Cambridge, Mrs. Cambridge, Catherine Duchess of Cambridge as The Court made clear prior to the royal wedding. There is also Princess William of Wales. The same way Prince Harry recently signed a Remberance card Henry, as it is his given name, there is no Duchess Kate.

Skippyboo 09-19-2015 06:53 PM

Lessons In Royalty
 
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge would indicate she is divorced from William. Also William lost the of Wales when he got his own peerage so no of Wales for them until William becomes Prince of Wales.


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Honeybees 09-19-2015 06:58 PM

My understanding is that the reason she was put in as ' Princess of the United Kingdom ' on their childrens birthday certificates was due to her being Princess William of Wales in the same way Their is a Princess Edward and the Duchess of Cambridge is referred to as Camilla, Duchess of Cambridge.

Skippyboo 09-19-2015 07:13 PM

Just Princess William because William is just Prince William. No of Wales anymore. He has his own peerage. Harry loses his of Wales when Charles becomes King.

Name, Title is divorced or widowed

Take Fergie: She was HRH The Duchess of York when married to Andrew. After divorced- Sarah, Duchess of York.


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Osipi 09-19-2015 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Honeybees (Post 1821757)
My understanding is that the reason she was put in as ' Princess of the United Kingdom ' on their childrens birthday certificates was due to her being Princess William of Wales in the same way Their is a Princess Edward and the Duchess of Cambridge is referred to as Camilla, Duchess of Cambridge.

When you use the female's given name and then the title, its denoting that she was at one time married to the holder of the title. Diana, Princess of Wales and Sarah, Duchess of York are prime examples. Camilla is referred to as The Duchess of Cornwall as she's still married to The Duke of Cornwall.

Mbruno 09-19-2015 07:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TLLK (Post 1820533)
I would imagine that Daniel and his predecessors: Phillip, Claus, and Henrik also may have received similar information prior to their weddings.

Daniel had lessons on Swedish history and constitutional law. I suppose he might also have taken lessons on royal protocol.

Osipi 09-19-2015 08:40 PM

I would imagine too that if Kate is scheduled to attend the Chinese state banquet that's coming up in October, she is getting a crash course in state dinners, the protocol surrounding it and everything else she'll need to know. When something comes up new, its probably the case that she has "Everything You Need To Know" lessons.:biggrin:

Skippyboo 09-19-2015 08:48 PM

I think the biggest issue at a state dinner is finding your seat since the royals (Sophie said she had that problem and got a look from the Queen IIRC) are spread all around the table and eating your dinner before the Queen finishes because they take the plates away when she is done.


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Iluvbertie 09-20-2015 04:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TLLK (Post 1820533)
I would imagine that Daniel and his predecessors: Phillip, Claus, and Henrik also may have received similar information prior to their weddings.

The others maybe but not Philip who grew up in royal circles with a grandfather, uncle etc who Kings in their own rights. He grew up with royals and stayed in palaces etc all his life. His mother and maternal grandmother were born in Windsor Castle and his great-grandmother in BP itself. He left from his grandmother's apartment at KP on his wedding day.

Honeybees 09-20-2015 04:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Osipi (Post 1821780)
I would imagine too that if Kate is scheduled to attend the Chinese state banquet that's coming up in October, she is getting a crash course in state dinners, the protocol surrounding it and everything else she'll need to know. When something comes up new, its probably the case that she has "Everything You Need To Know" lessons.:biggrin:

I believe that The Duchess of Cambridge has already attended several state dinners.

Honeybees 09-20-2015 04:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iluvbertie (Post 1821871)
The others maybe but not Philip who grew up in royal circles with a grandfather, uncle etc who Kings in their own rights. He grew up with royals and stayed in palaces etc all his life. His mother and maternal grandmother were born in Windsor Castle and his great-grandmother in BP itself. He left from his grandmother's apartment at KP on his wedding day.

. I have no doubt you know about this than I, Iluvbertie, but didn't Prince Philip as he was then have a rather troubled childhood in the sense of ill and absent parents, no fixed abode?

Osipi 09-20-2015 04:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Honeybees (Post 1821874)
I believe that The Duchess of Cambridge has already attended several state dinners.

Maybe I'm remembering wrong but I believe Kate has met with personages that have visited the UK in sort of a meet and greet way but I don't think she's ever attended a full blown white tie state dinner before.

She did attend one white tie dinner, I believe, but it wasn't a state dinner and for the life of me, I can't remember what it was. I think I need coffee. :biggrin:

Honeybees 09-20-2015 04:46 AM

I could be wrong but these events are not always brought to public attention and rarely are photographs issued but I believe that The DOC has already attended a few.

Osipi 09-20-2015 05:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Honeybees (Post 1821881)
I could be wrong but these events are not always brought to public attention and rarely are photographs issued but I believe that The DOC has already attended a few.

After a little bit of coffee I remembered what the tiara event was that Kate attended. It was a dinner/reception for the Diplomatic Corps. :whistling:

Honeybees 09-20-2015 05:47 AM

Again my point is that state dinners etc. do not always make it to The Court Circular and that I believe The Duchess of Cambridge has already attended a few State Dinners.

Mbruno 09-20-2015 06:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Iluvbertie (Post 1821871)
The others maybe but not Philip who grew up in royal circles with a grandfather, uncle etc who Kings in their own rights. He grew up with royals and stayed in palaces etc all his life. His mother and maternal grandmother were born in Windsor Castle and his great-grandmother in BP itself. He left from his grandmother's apartment at KP on his wedding day.


I don't think Prince Philip had "prince lessons" and he certainly wouldn't need lessons in royal protocol and etiquette. Having said that, the fact that one grew up in a royal family doesn't necessarily mean that he or she is familiar wih matters such as constitutional law.

Learning about how the government of the country works and the constitutional role of the monarchy is actually more important to the sovereign properly than to his/her consort , but it is nonetheless something the consort should be at least generally knowledgeable about. Prince Daniel's "lessons" were heavily focused for example on specifics about the Swedish parliament and government, as well as Swedish history and culture (the latter, in particular, was also a preparation for Daniel to interact with local communities throughout the country). I don't think protocol or where to sit in a royal banquet were that high on the priority list.

Also, a royal couple's preparation for a state visit goes far beyond etiquette. As we've seen in several posts here at TRF, Queen Mathilde for example had several months of preparation before her recent state visit to China, which included meeting with Chinese artists and learning about Chinese culture and history. I am pretty sure that King Philippe on the other hand was extensively briefed by the Belgian government on bilateral Sino-Belgian matters including trade, political and diplomatic issues.

In summary, being a senior royal is a serious matter and not just a question of how one dresses or eats in a state banquet.

Skippyboo 09-20-2015 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Honeybees (Post 1821905)
Again my point is that state dinners etc. do not always make it to The Court Circular and that I believe The Duchess of Cambridge has already attended a few State Dinners.


There are photos taken at a state dinner. There are only two inbound state dinner a year hosted by the Queen at BP or Windsor. If Kate attended one of these it would be covered by the press.

The Cambridges did attend the Diplomatic Reception Dinner in 2013 which is a tiara/white tie dress event.


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Honeybees 09-20-2015 11:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Skippyboo (Post 1822017)
There are photos taken at a state dinner. There are only two inbound state dinner a year hosted by the Queen at BP or Windsor. If Kate attended one of these it would be covered by the press.

The Cambridges did attend the Diplomatic Reception Dinner in 2013 which is a tiara/white tie dress event.


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I am quite sure there are photographs taken at every state dinner.

Skippyboo 09-20-2015 11:56 AM

Lessons In Royalty
 
And you said that Kate has attend state dinners but they aren't photos at these state dinners showing Kate there because she hasn't attended a UK state dinner.


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Honeybees 09-20-2015 12:00 PM

I believe I said that I believe, I would not state it as fact because I do not know it to be fact.

Skippyboo 09-20-2015 12:05 PM

But it is a fact. The photos of the state dinners since she married William show she wasn't there. The Irish state dinner in 2014, she and William were in New Zealand at the time.


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Honeybees 09-20-2015 02:34 PM

I said I believe, I did not state with certainty because I do not know for certain. I have no idea what goes on in Royal Palaces day by day, evening by evening and as Iluvbertie will atest, The Court Circular isn't updated to the nanosecond.

carlota 05-02-2016 08:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Honeybees (Post 1822139)
I said I believe, I did not state with certainty because I do not know for certain. I have no idea what goes on in Royal Palaces day by day, evening by evening and as Iluvbertie will atest, The Court Circular isn't updated to the nanosecond.

i am pretty sure that state dinners always make it to the circular. these are grand events happening at most twice a year on state visits by former heads of state - so not something that can be qualified as a 'nanosecond' kind of activity. ;)

Quote:

Originally Posted by LadyFinn (Post 1820589)
The press release from the Royal Court of Sweden:
Induction programme for Mr Daniel Westling - Sveriges Kungahus

interesting information! i liked seeing that one of the courts actually published how a new addition to the family was being inducted. i wonder if chris and sofia followed this too - their roles are of less importance than daniel's and chris' role is non official given he is not part of the royal family as such, but surely some sort of induction took place for them too, although maybe it was less long.

Duc_et_Pair 05-02-2016 08:53 AM

The same happened to Princess Máxima. A long introduction program was finally finished in 2004, with her entrance into the Raad van State (Council of State). In total the Princess' introduction program lasted three years since the official engagement in 2001.


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