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tommy100 08-29-2017 05:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mirabel (Post 2013262)
But then wouldn't there be criticism that George and Charlotte were taking places from children whose parents couldn't afford private school?

Hmm potentially, but thats the same if they attended a state school - they could afford to go to a private school. IMO there would be more said about them going to a "state school" than them taking a place away from others, after all if the children gain a place on their merits and live in the right catchment area why shouldn't they go?

Sophie Wessex gave birth to her children in an NHS hospital and no one said she took a bed away from another mother-to-be.

ladongas 08-29-2017 07:26 PM

We've had discussions in our country about why a President's child couldn't attend the local public schools in Washington, DC, but it proved too difficult to manage for security reasons. The campus would basically have to be locked down, and of course that wouldn't be fair to the rest of the (hundreds of) students at that school. The Clintons, the Obamas, and the Trumps all sent their kids to private schools.

camelot23ca 08-29-2017 10:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ladongas (Post 2013272)
We've had discussions in our country about why a President's child couldn't attend the local public schools in Washington, DC, but it proved too difficult to manage for security reasons. The campus would basically have to be locked down, and of course that wouldn't be fair to the rest of the (hundreds of) students at that school. The Clintons, the Obamas, and the Trumps all sent their kids to private schools.

I'm trying to think if any European royal children attend their local public school.

The Swedes are too young, as are Charlene and Albert's twins. The Danes go to a public school in a very well off area in which I think space was made especially for them, (or at least for Christian). I think the Norwegian children are now at fee paying schools. I'm not sure how the gymnasium the two eldest Dutch girls attend would be classified. The Spanish kids are in private school and I think the same is true for the Belgians? And now George will start private school, as well.

Somebody 08-29-2017 11:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by camelot23ca (Post 2013284)
I'm trying to think if any European royal children attend their local public school.

The Swedes are too young, as are Charlene and Albert's twins. The Danes go to a public school in a very well off area in which I think space was made especially for them, (or at least for Christian). I think the Norwegian children are now at fee paying schools. I'm not sure how the gymnasium the two eldest Dutch girls attend would be classified. The Spanish kids are in private school and I think the same is true for the Belgians? And now George will start private school, as well.

The Dutch princesses' primary school is/was their local public school (albeit in Wassenaar which is known for being a village mostly for the rich). Their secondary school is a 'bijzondere school'; I would not equate that to a private school. In the Netherlands we hardly have any private schools (except for a few international schools and some schools for drop-outs). A 'bijzondere school' is a school that is privately-run but publicly-paid (70% of the students in the Netherlands attend such a school). Their cousin countess Eloise attends the public Maerlant Lyceum which is not considered worse or better because of the different status; which is further evidenced by the fact that her younger brother count Claus attends the Vrijzinnig Christelijk Lyceum, which is 'bijzonder'; so no distinction is made even within one family.

There was quite some fuss about the Norwegian princess and prince changing from a public local school (which they attended for (most of) primary!) to a private international school not too long ago.

The Belgian princes and princesses indeed go to a Catholic (Jesuit) school that was previously attended by the former president of the European Union, so seems to have some standing. However, the important part in their (both Lorenz & Astrid and Filip & Mathilde) choice was that they chose a Dutch-speaking (instead of French-speaking) school which was a significant step in connecting with the Flemish part of the country.

Pranter 08-29-2017 11:28 PM

Do they speak a lot of Dutch in the Flemish part of the country? I would think the language would be well, Flemish?


LaRae

Somebody 08-30-2017 12:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pranter (Post 2013291)
Do they speak a lot of Dutch in the Flemish part of the country? I would think the language would be well, Flemish?

LaRae

Yes, they do! Officially it is the same language: Dutch. However, you are right in that it is the Flemish dialect of the Dutch language :flowers: (you wouldn't say that the Americans don't speak English, I suppose, but sometimes you might want to emphasize that it is the American variant).

Pranter 08-30-2017 12:32 AM

Ah..for some reason I thought Flemish was a subset of French...I have no idea why!

Interesting...thanks for the info!


LaRae

Somebody 08-30-2017 01:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pranter (Post 2013294)
Ah..for some reason I thought Flemish was a subset of French...I have no idea why!

Interesting...thanks for the info!

LaRae

In the Southern part of Belgium (Wallonia; and most of Brussels) they do speak French. Undoubtedly with their own Belgian particularities :innocent: (but my French is not good enough to speak to that).

But maybe we should get back on topic: I do expect the Cambridge children to go to an English speaking primary and secondary school; it would be interesting to see which languages they might study in addition!

muriel 08-30-2017 04:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Somebody (Post 2013300)
In the Southern part of Belgium (Wallonia; and most of Brussels) they do speak French. Undoubtedly with their own Belgian particularities :innocent: (but my French is not good enough to speak to that).

But maybe we should get back on topic: I do expect the Cambridge children to go to an English speaking primary and secondary school; it would be interesting to see which languages they might study in addition!

Most schools offer French as the second language. Further, some schools offer Mandarin or Spanish as well.

HereditaryPrincess 08-30-2017 01:09 PM

I think it would be nice if William and Catherine sent George and Charlotte to a grammar school or a good state school; but I agree with those who have said that there would be criticism about them making a less well-off child not get their places. The Cambridges are a bit "damned if they do; damned if they don't" - that's the problem of having a high profile position in the RF. I would like to see the day that a royal child attends a grammar or state school though. The state school system here in England is quite underrated IMO; and it needs someone like the Cambridges to get some people to think more positively about it.

I doubt it will happen though; I still think Eton and Marlborough are more likely secondary school options for the Cambridge children.

Rudolph 08-30-2017 01:09 PM

Quote:

Prince George is heading to school in style.

The 4-year-old royal’s first day at Thomas’s Battersea School in London is set for Sept. 7, and when he arrives (with mom Princess Kate and dad Prince William in tow), he’ll be wearing the co-ed school‘s uniform.

George has three different uniforms he’ll wear during his time at Thomas’s Battersea. The first is his “summer uniform,” which is likely what he’ll be wearing on his first day. It consists of a blue button-down shirt, shorts and a navy sweater with the school’s logo. To keep cool in the summer months, the boys wear ankle socks, not knee socks.
Read more: See Prince George's New School Uniform

akina21 08-30-2017 04:24 PM

What's next? He's going to eat in style , see the school lunch?

Mirabel 08-30-2017 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HereditaryPrincess (Post 2013430)
I would like to see the day that a royal child attends a grammar or state school though. The state school system here in England is quite underrated IMO; and it needs someone like the Cambridges to get some people to think more positively about it.


But aren't all the good state schools in London over-subscribed?

I'm always seeing articles about how people can't get their children into first-choice schools and resort to strategies like moving into the desired catchment area, or sending the children to live with grandparents, etc.

HereditaryPrincess 08-30-2017 07:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mirabel (Post 2013510)
But aren't all the good state schools in London over-subscribed?



I'm always seeing articles about how people can't get their children into first-choice schools and resort to strategies like moving into the desired catchment area, or sending the children to live with grandparents, etc.



That's because British state schools run under the catchment area system - which states that a child has to be a certain distance from the school to be able to attend. Even in the sleepy London suburb that I live in; I know of many people who have moved because they wanted their children to be able to fall under the catchment area of a good state school.
Naturally if a school is renowned to be good there will be contests to get in: but just as William did at his more recent course at Cambridge, I don't think George and Charlotte will need to worry much about the chances of getting into a school because of their royal status - it seems unfair but true.

cepe 08-30-2017 07:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HereditaryPrincess (Post 2013524)
That's because British state schools run under the catchment area system - which states that a child has to be a certain distance from the school to be able to attend. Even in the sleepy London suburb that I live in; I know of many people who have moved because they wanted their children to be able to fall under the catchment area of a good state school.
Naturally if a school is renowned to be good there will be contests to get in: but just as William did at his more recent course at Cambridge, I don't think George and Charlotte will need to worry much about the chances of getting into a school because of their royal status - it seems unfair but true.

There is no chance that William and Catherine's children will go to a state school. Even Anne's children had a private education (Gordonstoun). They will have already put their children's names down for their preferred schools as a safety net.

BTW William didn't get onto the Cambridge short course because of his royal status. He got in because it is a public course (no qualifications needed or to be gained) and he paid the requisite large course fee.

Iluvbertie 08-30-2017 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cepe (Post 2013525)
There is no chance that William and Catherine's children will go to a state school. Even Anne's children had a private education (Gordonstoun). They will have already put their children's names down for their preferred schools as a safety net.

BTW William didn't get onto the Cambridge short course because of his royal status. He got in because it is a public course (no qualifications needed or to be gained) and he paid the requisite large course fee.

But a lot of people don't understand that. Many people think that every course at these universities require the appropriate entrance marks.

William was already a graduate of St Andrews when he went to do that short course and so his A-level results had no bearing anyway.

All good universities offer short courses that don't lead to degrees but may lead to a certificate that adds to a person's qualifications. e.g. two years ago most of the staff at my school completed a Visible Thinking course through Harvard. We all have a certificate from Harvard but none of us would say we 'went to Harvard' or necessarily meet the 'entrance criteria' for a full degree there - we met the criteria for a 'short course' i.e. we were teachers at a recognised educational institution and communicated in English.

As for George and Charlotte going to a state school - I can't see it. They are the children of privately educated parents. On their father's side their ancestors are all privately educated either at private schools or at home. They would probably have some state school educated ancestors on their mother's side but given their class and their future they will go to private schools. The question is not 'private' versus 'state' but 'boarding' versus 'day'.

HereditaryPrincess 08-31-2017 05:15 AM

I think I should clear something up because it seems that my post about George and Charlotte going to a state school was taken too literally by some. It was purely hypothetical - of course they won't go to one, of course they come from a family of privately educated students. It was just a "what if".

Dee Anna 09-02-2017 05:16 AM

I believe Thomas's also has a pre-school so expecting this is where Charlotte will embark on her scholastic career?

Pranter 09-02-2017 03:25 PM

Yes I think so.


LaRae

Dee Anna 09-03-2017 03:23 AM

In most situations the transit from pre-school to formal school is helped by the fact that most, not all of course, are moving together in the same direction and same destination.

I wonder will George wonder where his other pre-schooler friends are and why they aren't in their London houses?!


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