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-   -   Education of Lady Louise and Viscount Severn (https://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/f114/education-of-lady-louise-and-viscount-severn-25879.html)

HereditaryPrincess 09-20-2020 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mbruno (Post 2343506)
I meant to ask why none of them seem interested in Math-oriented subjects. Prince William took Biology though, which at least is a natural science.

In my family, we're typically not the best at maths (most of us, to be brutally honest, aren't the sharpest tools in the box in general!) and are better at humanities or creative subjects. Sometimes it's hereditary - maybe this is also the case for the Windsors?

AC21091968 09-20-2020 07:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HereditaryPrincess (Post 2343507)
In my family, we're typically not the best at maths (most of us, to be brutally honest, aren't the sharpest tools in the box in general!) and are better at humanities or creative subjects. Sometimes it's hereditary - maybe this is also the case for the Windsors?

I remember reading The King's Speech by Mark Logue and Peter Conradi, George VI was terrible at Maths. Here is the extract I found online
"Bertie's problems were compounded by his dismal academic performance. Osborne was essentially a technical school, concentrating on maths, navigation, science and engineering. Although good at practical side of engineering and seamanship, he was a disaster at mathematics, typically coming bottom of the class or close to it"
Online version of the book
https://www.google.com.au/books/edit...sec=frontcover

The future King was sent to the Royal Navy College at Osbourne House on the Isle of Wight. Like George V, Bertie was destined for the Royal Navy (without any choice, I presumed). I am glad that young Royals now are free to choose what subjects they want to study and careers they want to pursue.

Curryong 09-20-2020 08:06 PM

I don't think either of Louise's parents showed any interest in mathematical subjects. I remember that Edward read History at Cambridge after Gordonstoun but there was quite a lot of criticism at the time of his admission because his A-levels were far below what was usually demanded at Oxbridge institutions.

Sophie left school to undertake a secretarial course and then went on to work in PR so I presume she didn't have a huge ability in the mathematics and sciences area either.

I agree with HereditaryPrincess that interest in these things tends to run in families. In mine we all tend to be arty and creative but maths leads most of us cold.

What is quite surprising though is that Prince Philip excelled as a naval officer, which included mathematics and science but Charles, who followed him into the RN, struggled as a schoolboy and cadet with those subjects. Andrew (as a naval officer) may have been capable and developed an interest in technology, but Anne and Edward don't seem to have been interested. So it's perhaps not surprising that Louise may well go in for an Arts degree at University.

AC21091968 09-25-2020 02:49 AM

As some posters have pointed out, James is currently attending Eagle House School (a coeducational preparatory school, near Sandhurst in Berkshire), according to a Sunday Times interview with the Countess of Wessex (published on 6th June). I assume he is in his final year at Eagle House School, before starting secondary school next year (in September).

Unfortunately, the article is behind a pay wall
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/c...ship-qngnxsdcg

I did originally find this information on Wikipedia, but with a citation to the Sunday Times article.

Claire 09-25-2020 03:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Curryong (Post 2343538)
I don't think either of Louise's parents showed any interest in mathematical subjects. I remember that Edward read History at Cambridge after Gordonstoun but there was quite a lot of criticism at the time of his admission because his A-levels were far below what was usually demanded at Oxbridge institutions.

Sophie left school to undertake a secretarial course and then went on to work in PR so I presume she didn't have a huge ability in the mathematics and sciences area either.

I agree with HereditaryPrincess that interest in these things tends to run in families. In mine we all tend to be arty and creative but maths leads most of us cold.

What is quite surprising though is that Prince Philip excelled as a naval officer, which included mathematics and science but Charles, who followed him into the RN, struggled as a schoolboy and cadet with those subjects. Andrew (as a naval officer) may have been capable and developed an interest in technology, but Anne and Edward don't seem to have been interested. So it's perhaps not surprising that Louise may well go in for an Arts degree at University.

I was told that Edward's results were incorrectly published in the press - and the palace did not correct the tabloid as it is would have made more of the story then it was worth.
However in really the only biography on Edward, by Ingrid Steward Prince Philip wanted Edward to explore possible employment in Accountancy or Engineering after he left the Marines. Seems rather odd for someone with no aptitude in figures for his father to want this. Might just have been wishful thinking on his father's side. Another thing that really doesn't add up is that Edward studied further in business after leaving the Marines which would have included Accounting subjects.

Claire 01-05-2021 06:28 AM

As the GCSE and A-levels will not go ahead in 2021 - I can only share my sorrow with Lady Louise and indeed the whole class of 2020 and 2021. Sorry don't think that assignment assessment does the trick
I do wonder if she will be taken an equivalent examination online or a longer gap year to wait it out. Either way I would be guttered if this has happened in my senior year.

AC21091968 01-05-2021 06:49 AM

I have a close family member who did the High School Certificate (HSC) and hence finished secondary school in 2020 (NSW, Australia). His school got shut down at April before re-opened in July and August (when Term 3 starts). Luckily, his school was able to facilitate the HSC exams and he was able to take the exams whilst the COVID-19 was zero at the time. It's only days before the results were released when the cases started again.

I do sympathise with those who are affected by lockdown, especially when the physical/paper exams are cancelled. It's almost like getting used to a new medium or approach in online exams. It's not just switching from writing to typing, but the questions might be different (similar to how open book vs. close book).

Is Lady Louise doing her A-level this year, so a year after doing GCSE?

Claire 01-05-2021 07:05 AM

Yep. That is what Sophie and Louise confirmed.

I think it has been confirmed in England that they will be doing assessment by the school now. I wonder if kids can write Scottish Education board ? Is that still a thing?

muriel 01-05-2021 08:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Claire (Post 2365222)
I think it has been confirmed in England that they will be doing assessment by the school now. I wonder if kids can write Scottish Education board ? Is that still a thing?

I do not believe it has been confirmed at this stage that GCSE and A levels will be awarded on the basis of assessments by school. All the government has said so far is that the exams will not go ahead in the expected format. How things will develop will need to be seen.

Heavs 01-05-2021 09:32 AM

I think it's for the best that they let people know now so that there might be some hope of figuring out a reasonable system by May/June. It's definitely not ideal but neither is any of this, it just can't be helped.

She's at a good school, they'll figure something out for their girls.

AC21091968 02-25-2021 05:35 AM

The Earl of Wessex did an interview with Sky News on the importance of non-academic schemes including the Duke of Edinburgh (DofE) award during COVID-19 restriction. This is the same interview where he said that The Duke of Edinburgh was "a lot better" and "looking forward to getting out"

At one point of the interview he mentioned about Lady Louise and Viscount Severn's homeschooling, which has been "chalk and cheese". He also mentioned about Lady Louise's GCSE being affected and how she prefer learning face-to-face with teachers and fellow students. Viscount Severn, however enjoys online learning at home. The Earl of Wessex also mentioned how lucky his family are, despite some struggles and frustration.

Quote:

The earl who has two teenage children, Louise who is 17 and James who is 13, said they had been "chalk and cheese" when it came to home-schooling.

He said "The eldest one Louise, she had her GCSEs interrupted last year, so we went through that whole pain of just having all of that suddenly taken away and so she sort of struggles a bit with the online learning because she'd much prefer to be with everyone…

"My younger one frankly thinks being at home and online is fantastic.

"I have to say half term came at just the right time because it was very interesting the frustrations that were beginning to show - and I reckon we weren't the only family to have experienced that.

"I count our blessings that we're lucky where we are."
Prince's plea to remember vital non-academic schemes in rush to catch-up schooling
The earl also spoke about the challenges of home schooling his two teenagers, saying they reacted to it "like chalk and cheese".
https://news.sky.com/story/princes-p...oling-12227797

Mbruno 02-25-2021 06:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Claire (Post 2365210)
As the GCSE and A-levels will not go ahead in 2021 - I can only share my sorrow with Lady Louise and indeed the whole class of 2020 and 2021. Sorry don't think that assignment assessment does the trick
I do wonder if she will be taken an equivalent examination online or a longer gap year to wait it out. Either way I would be guttered if this has happened in my senior year.


I read on the BBC site that a mix of mock exams, coursework and essays will be used to decide the final A-level or GCSE grades.


Personally I prefer external exams because they tend to be more objective and standardized (hence, theoretically fairer) than internal coursework assessment,and allow grades to be comparable across different schools. However, there are some advanced countries with excellent school systems, e.g. Canada, where final grades are based mostly on internal school assessment only and, nonetheless, students still go to university and do well there. I think Alberta is the only province in Canada that still has external provincial exams for final year (Grade 12) students and they count now for only 30 % of the final grade. British Columbia used to have provincial exams too, but I read they have been discontinued, except perhaps for Grade 12 English, but I am not sure. The Canadian posters may comment further.


In the US, external exams aren't normally part of final High School grades either, although some states may require students to take basic state literacy and numeracy tests as a requirement for graduation. As part of university (in US lingo, "college") entrance requirements, many students take external tests/exams, for example SATs and AP exams, but those are administered by private, nonprofit organizations like ETS or the College Board, rather than school districts or the states, and normally do not count for school grades.


I guess in-school coursework assessment might "do the trick" as you put it in countries where the school system is relatively homogeneous and quality doesn't change too much from school to school. That may be the case in Canada for example (I don't know), but certainly not in the US or the UK, hence the need for external exams/ standardized tests. Having said that, exam-based assessment also has shortcomings, mostly related to "coaching" and different levels of access to it. Perhaps a mix of coursework and external exams with different weights would be the best model. I think that is what is done in Australia, and I would appreciate comments from the Australian posters too.

poppy7 04-10-2021 06:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mbruno (Post 2373728)
I read on the BBC site that a mix of mock exams, coursework and essays will be used to decide the final A-level or GCSE grades.


Personally I prefer external exams because they tend to be more objective and standardized (hence, theoretically fairer) than internal coursework assessment,and allow grades to be comparable across different schools. However, there are some advanced countries with excellent school systems, e.g. Canada, where final grades are based mostly on internal school assessment only and, nonetheless, students still go to university and do well there. I think Alberta is the only province in Canada that still has external provincial exams for final year (Grade 12) students and they count now for only 30 % of the final grade. British Columbia used to have provincial exams too, but I read they have been discontinued, except perhaps for Grade 12 English, but I am not sure. The Canadian posters may comment further.


In the US, external exams aren't normally part of final High School grades either, although some states may require students to take basic state literacy and numeracy tests as a requirement for graduation. As part of university (in US lingo, "college") entrance requirements, many students take external tests/exams, for example SATs and AP exams, but those are administered by private, nonprofit organizations like ETS or the College Board, rather than school districts or the states, and normally do not count for school grades.


I guess in-school coursework assessment might "do the trick" as you put it in countries where the school system is relatively homogeneous and quality doesn't change too much from school to school. That may be the case in Canada for example (I don't know), but certainly not in the US or the UK, hence the need for external exams/ standardized tests. Having said that, exam-based assessment also has shortcomings, mostly related to "coaching" and different levels of access to it. Perhaps a mix of coursework and external exams with different weights would be the best model. I think that is what is done in Australia, and I would appreciate comments from the Australian posters too.

I think that is a rather simplistic and reductionist way of looking at the British education system. But then how are people to know when they don't work in an system.

Course work is, and has always been standardised between school groups to allow for childrens work to be equated with others. National programmes for writing exist where childrens work is scanned and assessed by people from all over the country so you can see if you are too harsh or too lenient.

Grading is hemmed in by previous marking, attainment and assessment. The only reason that anyone would be disadvantaged by the lack of exams is if they never did anything and somehow always managed to play blinders in the exam.


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