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Ista 10-10-2018 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MARG (Post 2156425)
Walkabouts are fair game and the only problem Samantha and their Security have is keeping up with them. Actually, I have visions on an RPO gritting his teeth every time Harry and Meghan stretch way over the barriers to touch hands.

But Reception lines of any kind are different. Next time you see Harry and Meghan "doing their own thing" instead of going up the reception line whether it be three or ten people, take a look at the faces of the people that were waiting and the organisers. It is just rude.

I suspect that by the time they have been through the intensive Australia/South Pacific tour a lot of this will have been smoothed out. It's early days, and they haven't really had time to hit their rhythm as a working couple yet. Its going to be interesting to see how they learn to keep the events moving along, at the same time keeping some of the warmth that makes them engaging as a couple.

That said, I agree that it is inconsiderate of the organizers (their hosts) to do their own freeform thing during reception lines and the more formal meet and greets.

victoriaalix 04-26-2020 01:53 AM

Tips on meeting British Royals?
 
Hello everyone!

I've read various accounts on people who've met any member of the British Royal Family. For some of these people, they met the royals by the way of getting invited to the receptions at Buckingham Palace. Others say they met the royals during their engagements elsewhere in the UK or overseas. Granted, events that involve the British royals are normally high security and its understandable.

For those who did get to meet any of them, what tips would you offer to people who are about to do the same or are interested to do the same?

Happysoul 08-19-2020 10:12 AM

Can any one throw some light on seating etiquette at Banquets/State dinners. Downton Abbey table manners stipulate to enter and leave from the right of the chair. Hoever commonwealth defence forces which carry the British legacy of life style and dinning teach the soldiers and officers to enter from the left side of the chair and leave from the right. Armies in USA, Canada and India still follow this rule religiously. What I want to know is what’s the rule at the Buckingham Palace. I saw the Queen entering from the right of thr chair in dinner with Army in 1956 but from the left of the chair in recent state dinners. The guest on the two long tables on right and left of the table were doing it differently. The ones in left side were entering from the left of the chairs and the ones on the right table were entering from thr right side. I just wonder what’s the protocol guests have to follow.

victor1319 08-19-2020 06:21 PM

:previous: Well, normally, if eating out-house, one does so in a restaurant - and there the customer is King... left vs right? Who cares, as long as the customer pays?

But an official banquet is tricky. Normally the man is seated left from the woman and if he helps her to sit down with her "complex" evening-gown, then she has to enter the chair logically from the right, since the man is standing left, manipulating the chair.

So, the Armed Forces... Mainly only men I assume and the women not in evening-gowns? No need to help... what could be an explanation...

Disclaimer: I am from Germany and have absolutely no idea about Commonwealth Armed Forces etiquette!

Mbruno 08-19-2020 06:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Happysoul (Post 2337026)
Can any one throw some light on seating etiquette at Banquets/State dinners. Downton Abbey table manners stipulate to enter and leave from the right of the chair. Hoever commonwealth defence forces which carry the British legacy of life style and dinning teach the soldiers and officers to enter from the left side of the chair and leave from the right. Armies in USA, Canada and India still follow this rule religiously. What I want to know is what’s the rule at the Buckingham Palace. I saw the Queen entering from the right of thr chair in dinner with Army in 1956 but from the left of the chair in recent state dinners. The guest on the two long tables on right and left of the table were doing it differently. The ones in left side were entering from the left of the chairs and the ones on the right table were entering from thr right side. I just wonder what’s the protocol guests have to follow.




I have no idea, but the videos below of the recent Spanish and Dutch state visits show how they did it.


https://youtu.be/OCk_pMBmHm0?t=114


https://youtu.be/Yilp9LKhfa0?t=413

Helen.CH 08-21-2020 07:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Happysoul (Post 2337026)
Can any one throw some light on seating etiquette at Banquets/State dinners. Downton Abbey table manners stipulate to enter and leave from the right of the chair. Hoever commonwealth defence forces which carry the British legacy of life style and dinning teach the soldiers and officers to enter from the left side of the chair and leave from the right. Armies in USA, Canada and India still follow this rule religiously. What I want to know is what’s the rule at the Buckingham Palace. I saw the Queen entering from the right of thr chair in dinner with Army in 1956 but from the left of the chair in recent state dinners. The guest on the two long tables on right and left of the table were doing it differently. The ones in left side were entering from the left of the chairs and the ones on the right table were entering from thr right side. I just wonder what’s the protocol guests have to follow.

"usually" one enters from the right, but a banquette has its own rules as the space is sometimes rrrreally narrow plus it depends on the provided service.
as the table partner is on the left side the ladies enter from the right. goes back to some very old rules set concerning religious traditions, when the "right" /correct/good hand was the right, provided to make the cross.....
still done in monasteries everyhwere and later adapted from nobility.


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