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-   -   Albert, Prince Consort (1819-1861) (https://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/f165/albert-prince-consort-1819-1861-a-1111.html)

Denville 07-22-2018 05:45 AM

I think you are seeing Alix as a 20th or 21st C girl. She wasn't. She was a 19th Century princess... with very differnet experiences and outlook

Iluvbertie 07-22-2018 06:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wartenberg7 (Post 2136073)
I donīt think when a teenage girl says she loves a guy, perhaps in 98,5 % cases, it cannot possibly be enough for a longlasting marriage. Who knows at that age, no matter 19th century or nowadays, what love is and means!? This week I love boy x, next week itī s y....
I guess she said so because she wanted to be a good, obedient little daughter... And I do not believe a second that future royal spouses got married, thinking "Oh, Iī ll be betrayed one day anyway..."
And please, NOBODY is glad to give up ones sex life in normal, healthy circumstances:whistling::ermm:!

But after the sixth child died she was told not to have sex anymore so she wasn't in a normal healthy situation anyway. Had she had another pregnancy there was a good chance she would have died and so aged in her mid-20s she had to give up sex leaving her husband with the same choice - no sex or have mistresses.

Denville 07-22-2018 07:06 AM

I've never heard this, but when her health was not that good (attack of rheumatic fever during pregnancy), her deafness etc.. I think that 6 children in about 7 years ddi exhaust her and she was glad to stop having babies...
I don't think that sex was high on herlist of priorities, it wasn't, for many women at the time, when there was no effective contraception.. THey didn't see it as a fun activity.. it was soemthign that led to painful pregnancy and labour, and risking your life...

Tsaritsa 07-22-2018 07:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Denville (Post 2136098)
I've never heard this, but when her health was not that good (attack of rheumatic fever during pregnancy), her deafness etc.. I think that 6 children in about 7 years ddi exhaust her and she was glad to stop having babies...
I don't think that sex was high on herlist of priorities, it wasn't, for many women at the time, when there was no effective contraception.. THey didn't see it as a fun activity.. it was soemthign that led to painful pregnancy and labour, and risking your life...

Her ma-in-law, Victoria, is alleged to have adored 'making them' stage of having babies. She didn't like the bits that followed.

Denville 07-22-2018 08:03 AM

Yes Victoria was highly sexed, not all women were. That's why I said "many women". Alexandra was a 19th woman, and she didn't see sex, marriage or fidelity in the same way that a modern woman might ...

Gawin 07-22-2018 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Denville (Post 2136072)
They grew apart, but retained a basic fondness and relationship. Alix enjoyed social life as a young bride and they had that in common, but her deafness did make her more inclined to stay home and be with her children and her familiar friends. She wasn't very clever and while Bertie was no giant intellect, he did have more interests which Alix didn't really share...so it was pretty much on hte cards that they would grow apart...
And while she had enjoyed society fora few years, I think that even without the deafness, she would have probably become more of a homebody, and had less to share with her husband.
She was possessive of the children, and didn't treat her daughters, esp Victoria very well...

Good grief! Why does the burden fall on Alexandra? Why point out her flaws but not Edward's?

Yes, Alexandra was a possessive mother who expected Princess Victoria to be on her beck and call. But Edward didn't always treat Alexandra well. Not all royal husbands cheated on their wives, including Alexandra's son, her father, and her brother-in-law Alexander of Russia.The fact that Alexandra actually loved Edward could only have increased her pain and disappointment. Of course she disliked society if it meant facing all the woman her husband had slept with. Edward was very self-indulgent and chose to fritter away his life on parties, mistresses, food, and gambling. His inappropriate associations even led to his being called to testify in court twice. His behavior was hardly befitting the heir to the throne.

Alexandra, on the other hand, always conducted herself with dignity. Give the woman her due. What if Edward had found himself married to someone like Marie of Romania, who took her her own lovers and whose children's paternity has been questioned? Fortunately for Edward, Alexandra chose to keep her mouth shut, look the other way, and take out her unhappiness on their children.

wartenberg7 07-22-2018 10:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Denville (Post 2136115)
Yes Victoria was highly sexed, not all women were. That's why I said "many women". Alexandra was a 19th woman, and she didn't see sex, marriage or fidelity in the same way that a modern woman might ...


Thatīs why they went hysteric and fainted all the time (not only because of the tight corsets), because these upper class women tried to surpress their sexuality, as Psychoanalysis found out.
I believe we have nowadays a very limited and strange view upon these past eras. I strongly believe that sexuality was always a very strong and important force in both male or females lives. In some circles women claimed to be "not interested in such activities at all" (which was of course a big fat lie!) because they thought this was the right thing to say for a "decent" woman. All those who admitted it was such great fun had been seen as sluts...


By the way, it wasnīt hard to be "sexed" with a hubby like Albert...:lol:

Curryong 08-11-2018 09:31 PM

Vicky was born in 1840, but it's true that nobility and Kings placed great emphasis on having sons. Nevertheless, Vicky became Albert's favourite child (he could discuss things with her that he couldn't with his other children.) Ernst, Albert's brother, never had legitimate children of his own as he reputedly suffered from syphilis.

Denville 08-12-2018 04:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Curryong (Post 2141258)
Vicky was born in 1840, but it's true that nobility and Kings placed great emphasis on having sons. Nevertheless, Vicky became Albert's favourite child (he could discuss things with her that he couldn't with his other children.) Ernst, Albert's brother, never had legitimate children of his own as he reputedly suffered from syphilis.

But he had illegitimate children, did he? Did he not attempt to father children with his wife because of the syphilis?

CyrilVladisla 08-12-2018 09:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Denville (Post 2141319)
But he had illegitimate children, did he? Did he not attempt to father children with his wife because of the syphilis?

Did Duke Ernest II of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha have any children at all? I was under the impression he had no illegitimate children.

CyrilVladisla 12-14-2020 02:26 AM

Prince Albert paid a visit to Ireland with Queen Victoria.
https://www.alamy.com/stock-image-eng...162594885.html

An Ard Ri 12-14-2020 05:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CyrilVladisla (Post 2360578)
Prince Albert paid a visit to Ireland with Queen Victoria.
https://www.alamy.com/stock-image-eng...162594885.html

The queen visited Ireland a total of 4 times.

1849 with Prince Albert
1853 with Prince Albert
1861 with Prince Albert
1900

Prinsara 10-18-2021 06:10 PM

As far as biographies go, I'm still fond of Stanley Weintraub's Uncrowned King, which was one of the first royal books I read. I thought I would like A.N. Wilson's biography as much as I liked his earlier one of Victoria, but not so much.

He's a very complicated guy for someone who lived a very straightforward life. I forget which book it was that posed whether his basically-unconstitutional hold on power would have actually become a problem had he lived longer...

Prinsara 10-18-2021 06:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CyrilVladisla (Post 2141521)
Did Duke Ernest II of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha have any children at all? I was under the impression he had no illegitimate children.

The Duke of Connaught and (I believe) Prince Louis of Battenberg were visiting Coburg and apparently much of the town was waving at them and greeting them in a very casual manner. Louis asked Arthur what was going on and he said they were the "dear, good Ernst" (the Duchess of SCG's term)'s illegitimates. ;)

Curryong 10-18-2021 07:00 PM

Yes, Ernst was certainly the direct opposite of Albert in the sexual morality department. He had many illegitimate children, and was another of those husbands who reputedly gave their wives an STD which ultimately prevented them from having any children of their own.

duchessrachel 10-19-2021 01:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Prinsara (Post 2432123)
As far as biographies go, I'm still fond of Stanley Weintraub's Uncrowned King, which was one of the first royal books I read. I thought I would like A.N. Wilson's biography as much as I liked his earlier one of Victoria, but not so much.

He's a very complicated guy for someone who lived a very straightforward life. I forget which book it was that posed whether his basically-unconstitutional hold on power would have actually become a problem had he lived longer...

Thank you. That is the one I have been considering so I will read it.

Mbruno 10-19-2021 01:35 PM

Why was Prince Albert frequently painted wearing both the Order of the Garter and the Order of the Golden Fleece?

I understand that the Prince would normally wear the insignia of the Garter when required for official functions, but did he actually wear the Golden Fleece regularly in the UK? I find it somewhat strange given that it is a foreign order.


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