The Royal Forums Coat of Arms


Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #1  
Old 06-14-2020, 11:17 AM
Somebody's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Somewhere, Suriname
Posts: 4,659
The Imperial Household

Moved from the discussion on the Waringo Investigation:

Quote:
Originally Posted by tommy100 View Post
Sorry but Queen Victoria should not be a model for now. Again, I don't think any modern constitutional monarchy is now limited as to who it can hire and fire, with all such matters having to go through the Government. Even where such rules may be in place it would be as very much "rubber stamping' whatever the Royal court wants. Clearly the Government are clipping the wings of the Grand Duke and Grand Duchess, likely because it is having to pick up the bill for so many redundancy packages for what could be seen as unfair,unlawful, unjust dismissals of staff.

Imagine the fuss if King Willem Alexander announced his most senior aide was leaving, only for the Dutch government to say "oh no he isn't, we haven't signed that off so he must stay and you must find a role for him"

If nothing else is shows there is poor communication or understanding between the Cour and government.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
Is the Government not responsible for hiring and firing the staff of the Imperial Household Agency in Japan, which is the most modern constitutional monarchy in the world? The Government fired the head of the Agency in 2016 due to his support of the Emperor's wish to abdicate, which was against Government policy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nice Nofret View Post
Well the Japanese Modell seems to be the other extreme. The Emperor and his family seem to be more slaves to the system than to have any say at all about their lives.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebody View Post
I agree. Not sure why the Japanese court would be most modern. The imperial family seems to be held hostage by the Imperial Household and I am quite sure the European royal families wouldn't accept such a fate (and rightly so).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
Not the court, but the constitutional monarchy (in response to post #327). The constitution of Japan restricts the powers of the monarch more than any other reigning monarchy in the world.
I see, thanks for the clarification.

However, does the constitution also prescribe that the imperial family is to follow the orders of the Household instead of the other way around? I would hope not but it seems to be what is happening.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-14-2020, 12:23 PM
Duc_et_Pair's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: City, Netherlands
Posts: 10,368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebody View Post
Moved from the discussion on the Waringo Investigation:










I see, thanks for the clarification.

However, does the constitution also prescribe that the imperial family is to follow the orders of the Household instead of the other way around? I would hope not but it seems to be what is happening.
In 1945 it was: be on a strict short leash, limited by all sides, or the monarchy is abolished. Period. Imagine that Adolf Hitler could remain Reichskanzler for 44 more years, after 1945. But Emperor Hirohito could stay for 44 more years after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki ended World War II.

The extremely strict Household organization was an strict condition by the Allied Powers to let the Emperor and the monarchy survive. In return the Emperor was never subjected to any tribunal of justice.

In hindsight it may be too strict for Akihito and Naruhito, but this was the price the imperial family had to pay for all the atrocities which were inflicted in name of the living deity, which was the Emperor.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-17-2020, 04:46 AM
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bay Area, United States
Posts: 4,780
The Imperial Household Agency announced 3 new advisors and 4 current advisors will retire, effective on June 18.

New advisors:
Noriyuki Kazaoka (73) - former Grand Steward (June 2012 - September 2016) and Vice-Grand Steward of IHA (April 2005 - June 2012), former vice-minister of land, infrastructure, transport and tourism. Kazaoka played a central role in Emperor Akihito's August 2016 video message about wishing to abdicate. PM Shinzo Abe and government were displeased and Kazaoka's early retirement was seen as punishment. He would have retired ~6 months later anyway.

Itsurō Terada (72) - 18th Chief Justice of Japan, promoted judicial system reforms, and served on the panel to select the new era name "Reiwa"

Makoto Iokibe (76) - President of Hyogo Prefectural University, political scientist, Chairman of Asian Affairs Research Council, President of the National Defense Academy of Japan and adviser on foreign policy to the Government of Japan

Retiring advisors:
Makoto Watanabe (84) - adviser since 2012, former Japanese diplomat, joined Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1959, Ambassador to Jordon (1988-1990)

Takaji Kunimatsu (82) - adviser since 2012, former commissioner of the National Police Agency

Shingo Haketa (78) - former Grand Steward (April 2005 - June 2012) and Vice Grand Steward (2001-2005), career in the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare

Hironobu Takesaki (75) - 17th Chief Justice of Japan


6 advisors (former Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida, economist Shinzo Koizumi, and 4 former Keio University presidents) were appointed to advise Emperor Showa for the first time in 1964. There are no fixed term limits, retirement age, numbers or compensation. The IHA selects the advisors and the Emperor confirms the appointment.

Advisors will meet with the Emperor and Empress regularly although the frequency may vary. In the Heisei era, advisors met the Emperor, Empress, and Grand Steward about once a month to discuss issues on the Imperial family. With the Emperor Akihito's approval, they met Crown Prince Naruhito and Prince Akishino twice a year. Most meetings in the latter years of the Heisei era were about Emperor Akihito's wish to abdicate.

Sources: Sankei, Asahi, Jiji
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-17-2020, 11:08 AM
Stefan's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Esslingen, Germany
Posts: 4,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
The Imperial Household Agency announced 3 new advisors and 4 current advisors will retire, effective on June 18.

New advisors:
Noriyuki Kazaoka (73) - former Grand Steward (June 2012 - September 2016) and Vice-Grand Steward of IHA (April 2005 - June 2012), former vice-minister of land, infrastructure, transport and tourism. Kazaoka played a central role in Emperor Akihito's August 2016 video message about wishing to abdicate. PM Shinzo Abe and government were displeased and Kazaoka's early retirement was seen as punishment. He would have retired ~6 months later anyway.

Itsurō Terada (72) - 18th Chief Justice of Japan, promoted judicial system reforms, and served on the panel to select the new era name "Reiwa"

Makoto Iokibe (76) - President of Hyogo Prefectural University, political scientist, Chairman of Asian Affairs Research Council, President of the National Defense Academy of Japan and adviser on foreign policy to the Government of Japan

Retiring advisors:
Makoto Watanabe (84) - adviser since 2012, former Japanese diplomat, joined Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1959, Ambassador to Jordon (1988-1990)

Takaji Kunimatsu (82) - adviser since 2012, former commissioner of the National Police Agency

Shingo Haketa (78) - former Grand Steward (April 2005 - June 2012) and Vice Grand Steward (2001-2005), career in the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare

Hironobu Takesaki (75) - 17th Chief Justice of Japan


6 advisors (former Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida, economist Shinzo Koizumi, and 4 former Keio University presidents) were appointed to advise Emperor Showa for the first time in 1964. There are no fixed term limits, retirement age, numbers or compensation. The IHA selects the advisors and the Emperor confirms the appointment.

Advisors will meet with the Emperor and Empress regularly although the frequency may vary. In the Heisei era, advisors met the Emperor, Empress, and Grand Steward about once a month to discuss issues on the Imperial family. With the Emperor Akihito's approval, they met Crown Prince Naruhito and Prince Akishino twice a year. Most meetings in the latter years of the Heisei era were about Emperor Akihito's wish to abdicate.

Sources: Sankei, Asahi, Jiji



All pretty old. Could they find none who are a bit older. Why don't the hire younger people for this Jobs.
__________________
Stefan



Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-17-2020, 11:23 AM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: St Thomas, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands
Posts: 2,578
I think it is wonderful that the Emperor and the Agency can benefit from the counsel of individuals with decades of service in the highest echelons of government and academia, and that these men are given the opportunity to put their learned experiences to the benefit of their country even after retirement. And I would guess that for example an emeritus Supreme Court Chief Justice is better able to accommodate the political neutrality and the time commitment that the role demands than a serving Supreme Court Chief Justice.

I wish female advisers could be included, but given the low proportion of women in government and management I suppose that is a challenge.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebody View Post
However, does the constitution also prescribe that the imperial family is to follow the orders of the Household instead of the other way around? I would hope not but it seems to be what is happening.
The Constitution (in English) does not mention the Imperial Household Agency, but it states that the Emperor is to have no role in government. And inasmuch as the IHA is a government agency under the Prime Minister's Office, in my opinion it would be usurping the authority of the Prime Minister - who, unlike the imperial family, is a democratically elected representative - if the imperial family attempted to control the IHA. But that is my personal view, and I am certainly not a Japanese constitutional expert.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-17-2020, 02:09 PM
Stefan's Avatar
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Esslingen, Germany
Posts: 4,986
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
I think it is wonderful that the Emperor and the Agency can benefit from the counsel of individuals with decades of service in the highest echelons of government and academia, and that these men are given the opportunity to put their learned experiences to the benefit of their country even after retirement. And I would guess that for example an emeritus Supreme Court Chief Justice is better able to accommodate the political neutrality and the time commitment that the role demands than a serving Supreme Court Chief Justice.

Thats true but would there not be some people who are a bit younger like in their 60's or.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post

The Constitution (in English) does not mention the Imperial Household Agency, but it states that the Emperor is to have no role in government. And inasmuch as the IHA is a government agency under the Prime Minister's Office, in my opinion it would be usurping the authority of the Prime Minister - who, unlike the imperial family, is a democratically elected representative - if the imperial family attempted to control the IHA. But that is my personal view, and I am certainly not a Japanese constitutional expert.
So the Emperor has no role in th eorganization of the Imperiasl Household Agency. A bit strange would be as Queen Elizabeth II., or Queen Margrethe II. have no saying in organizig their respecive Court adminstrations.
__________________

__________________
Stefan



Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
emperor, imperial household, japan, royal court


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Crown Princess Victoria's Household/Court Marengo Crown Princess Victoria, Prince Daniel and Family 126 07-17-2020 07:18 AM
The Royal Household, Courtiers, Advisers and Attendants JOY! British Royals 356 07-07-2020 02:29 PM
The Imperial Household Council Toledo Imperial Family of Japan 48 11-12-2017 03:01 PM
Multimedia from The Imperial Household Agency Poppy Imperial Family of Japan 3 01-18-2008 02:08 PM




Popular Tags
abdication abu dhabi american history bangladesh belgian royal family bridal gown canada chittagong cht clarence house coronavirus countess of snowdon danish history diana princess of wales dna dutch dutch history dutch royal family edo facts family tree fantasy movie genealogy habsburg henry v hill historical drama house of bourbon house of grimaldi house of orange-nassau house of saxe-coburg and gotha imperial household intro jewelry jumma languages list of rulers lithuanian castles mail maxima mbs netherlands northern ireland norway norway history palaces palestine prince daniel princess chulabhorn princess dita random facts royal dress-ups royal jewels royal marriage royal re-enactments. royal wedding royal wedding gown russian court dress settings shakespeare spain spanish royal swedish royal family thailand thai royal family tips tracts united kingdom visit from sweden working royals; full-time royals; part-time royals;


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:35 PM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2020
Jelsoft Enterprises
×