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  #1101  
Old 11-16-2018, 12:07 AM
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On November 11th, the CDP discussed succession and the Imperial family with university students at this month's "Fui no kai" meeting. The meeting was beneficial as participants said although they do not usually think about the Imperial family, they would like to think about it now.

https://twitter.com/banrikaieda/stat...42350298636288

布衣の会 "Fui no kai" appears to be some kind of outreach program. The name "Fui no kai" translates to "clothing association" where 布衣 meant clothes of ordinary people, made of cotton and hemp. The name points to the relationship between rich and poor.


On November 14th, the CDP held its 6th meeting on stable succession and welcomed Yasuo Hasebe, professor at Waseda University's Faculty of Law, as lecturer. Hasebe spoke about the background and abdication of Edward VIII, conflict between Catholics and Protestants in Europe, and the rise of mass media.

https://twitter.com/banrikaieda/stat...62225851179010
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  #1102  
Old 11-21-2018, 02:38 AM
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The CDP website posted the 6th meeting with Professor Yasuo Hasebe on November 14th:
https://cdp-japan.jp/news/20181119_1077 (Google translation)


On November 19th, the CDP held its 7th meeting on stable succession and invited former Supreme Court Judge Itsuo Sonobe to discuss 1) next year's abdication/succession 2) permanent succession to the throne. Mr. Sonobe was a central member of the committee on Imperial House Law for the Koizumi Cabinet in 2005.

https://twitter.com/banrikaieda/stat...36049785438208
https://twitter.com/banrikaieda/stat...36055284232192
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  #1103  
Old 11-29-2018, 01:17 AM
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On November 21st, the CDP held its 8th meeting on stable succession and invited Dr. Hideya Kawanishi, Associate Professor at Nagoya University Graduate School of Humanities, as lecturer. The meeting's topic focused on the emperor and Imperial family in post-war Japan. Dr. Kawanishi discussed the symbolism as someone born in Showa 50s (1970s) and the way public events are performed in the Heisei era.

Shiori Yamao did not attend the 8th meeting because she was dealing with the LDP pushing through immigration and refugee legislation.

https://twitter.com/banrikaieda/stat...78729637650432


Japanese historian Takashi Tanaka died on November 24 at age 94 [Mainichi]. I saw a bunch of Japanese tweets mention he advocated female emperor and female imperial branches. Last March he told newspapers that succession should follow directly as in Aiko succeeding Naruhito [Jiji].
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  #1104  
Old 12-07-2018, 01:37 AM
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On December 7th, the CDP held its 9th meeting on stable succession. The committee discussed the previous 8 lectures and future schedule.

https://twitter.com/banrikaieda/stat...79662040014848
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  #1105  
Old 12-07-2018, 05:45 AM
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So far, they don't seem to have engaged any persons who are currently in power or made an impact in the media.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
On November 14th, the CDP held its 6th meeting on stable succession and welcomed Yasuo Hasebe, professor at Waseda University's Faculty of Law, as lecturer. Hasebe spoke about the background and abdication of Edward VIII, conflict between Catholics and Protestants in Europe, and the rise of mass media.

https://twitter.com/banrikaieda/stat...62225851179010
It would be interesting to know how Mr. Hasebe managed to connect the abdication of King Edward VIII of Great Britain and Catholic-Protestant conflict in Europe to stable succession in 21st century Japan!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post

Japanese historian Takashi Tanaka died on November 24 at age 94 [Mainichi]. I saw a bunch of Japanese tweets mention he advocated female emperor and female imperial branches. Last March he told newspapers that succession should follow directly as in Aiko succeeding Naruhito [Jiji].
I'm aware it won't happen, but Mr. Tanaka's solution would certainly reinvigorate tensions between Fumihito and Naruhito.

Of those Japanese who are in favor of equal succession, I wonder how many want Aiko to inherit and how many want to put equal succession in place only for children born in the future.
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  #1106  
Old 12-07-2018, 08:23 AM
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Wre there tensions between brothers?
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  #1107  
Old 12-17-2018, 02:37 AM
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On December 12th, the CDP held its 10th meeting on stable succession and heard from the Imperial Household Agency about the imperial economy, mainly on the outline of next year's fiscal budget.
https://twitter.com/banrikaieda/stat...70249777238017

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
[...] It would be interesting to know how Mr. Hasebe managed to connect the abdication of King Edward VIII of Great Britain and Catholic-Protestant conflict in Europe to stable succession in 21st century Japan!

[...]

Of those Japanese who are in favor of equal succession, I wonder how many want Aiko to inherit and how many want to put equal succession in place only for children born in the future.
I think Mr. Hasebe described how the British monarchy and other institutions evolved. Due to religious conflict, those who married to Catholics lost their place in succession. However, they were reinstated after a new law was passed recently. About Edward VIII, Mr. Hasebe focused on the church's stance at the time that did not allow divorcees with living ex-spouses to remarry. That's no longer the case since 2002.

CDP's website updated on the 6th meeting: https://cdp-japan.jp/news/20181119_1077

Yeah, I wonder as well about where the Japanese would start equal succession... My guess would be after Hisahito as I don't see Japan "taking away" the throne from Hisahito to give it to Aiko à la Denmark or Sweden's succession change.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biri View Post
Wre there tensions between brothers?
Yes, CP Naruhito criticized the IHA for denying Masako opportunities and her personality in 2004 during a press conference before a visit abroad. This led to the Emperor Akihito and the IHA scolding the crown prince. Prince Akishino also jumped in to scold his elder brother. IMO it was unnecessary for Akishino to interfere. Birthday and IHA press conferences become battlegrounds for some years afterward although the rift was mended now.

Background: Masako developed shingles in late 2003 and then suffered a nervous breakdown in 2004 so she had been out of public view for a while when Naruhito made his comments.
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  #1108  
Old 03-19-2019, 02:19 AM
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Japan to start discussions soon on imperial succession system - The Mainichi
Quote:
The government said Monday it will soon start discussing how to achieve a stable imperial succession, including the creation of female branches of the imperial family.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said during a parliamentary committee session the government will study whether or not to allow female members to remain in the imperial family even when they marry commoners. The process will start immediately after Crown Prince Naruhito succeeds Emperor Akihito on May 1, he said.

[...] The government has held discussions in the past on whether a female member can ascend the throne, but Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's ruling Liberal Democratic Party has been cautious about changing the law to allow female monarchs.

[...]
No progress on debate over reducing Imperial Family's burdens as succession nears - The Mainichi
Quote:
[...]

"There is no definition for an emperor's public duties aside from acts in matters of state," Isao Tokoro, an expert on the history of the Imperial System and a professor emeritus at Kyoto Sangyo University said. "There is a need to think of a new way of doing things, using the upcoming abdication and ensuing succession as an opportunity to do so." But there are no signs that such discussion is taking place. The Imperial Household Agency's review of the emperor's public duties led to no fundamental changes. A senior agency official explained, "Since the new emperor will be younger, we decided to pass the baton with duties as they currently are."

Crown Prince Naruhito has expressed his enthusiasm for pursuing what is required of the Imperial Family "in accordance with the changing times." At a press conference last year, he said that "depending on changes in society, what society seeks from the Imperial Family will change. It is important that we respond to that." [...]

Some criticize that the range of activities carried out by the Imperial Family is expanding as the number of Imperial Family members dwindles. Hideya Kawanishi, an associate professor of modern and contemporary Japanese history at Nagoya University, says there is a need for a nationwide discussion on the issue. "The bar has been lowered for the public to seek certain things from the Imperial Family. We can't deny that the Imperial Family's desire to stay by the side of the people has made them busier. Now is the time to scrap the current way of doing things and build a new one," he suggested.
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  #1109  
Old 03-19-2019, 11:50 AM
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Hmmm, forgive me for being skeptical. The Abe government has never struck me as a champion of equal rights - on the contrary.
So wonder if this is merely for show?

But as the Imperial family is rapidly running out of spares, it's about time! - If they mean it...
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  #1110  
Old 03-19-2019, 01:37 PM
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Me too don't believe that there will be any changes on succession laws. Seems ratherly PR trick.
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  #1111  
Old 03-19-2019, 02:31 PM
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I read this and snorted. It would be nice if it were true, and there was going to be a substantive discussion followed by a realistic action plan, but I think this is posturing on the part of the government. I would so love to be proven wrong, but I'm not holding my breath.

A senior agency official explained, "Since the new emperor will be younger, we decided to pass the baton with duties as they currently are." And it's good that Naruhito has been forewarned: he's younger, so he's going to be loaded up with duties until he wears out. Good to know.
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  #1112  
Old 03-19-2019, 04:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
Japan to start discussions soon on imperial succession system - The Mainichi

No progress on debate over reducing Imperial Family's burdens as succession nears - The Mainichi

[...]

"There is no definition for an emperor's public duties aside from acts in matters of state," Isao Tokoro, an expert on the history of the Imperial System and a professor emeritus at Kyoto Sangyo University said. "There is a need to think of a new way of doing things, using the upcoming abdication and ensuing succession as an opportunity to do so." But there are no signs that such discussion is taking place. The Imperial Household Agency's review of the emperor's public duties led to no fundamental changes. A senior agency official explained, "Since the new emperor will be younger, we decided to pass the baton with duties as they currently are."

Crown Prince Naruhito has expressed his enthusiasm for pursuing what is required of the Imperial Family "in accordance with the changing times." At a press conference last year, he said that "depending on changes in society, what society seeks from the Imperial Family will change. It is important that we respond to that." [...]

Some criticize that the range of activities carried out by the Imperial Family is expanding as the number of Imperial Family members dwindles. Hideya Kawanishi, an associate professor of modern and contemporary Japanese history at Nagoya University, says there is a need for a nationwide discussion on the issue. "The bar has been lowered for the public to seek certain things from the Imperial Family. We can't deny that the Imperial Family's desire to stay by the side of the people has made them busier. Now is the time to scrap the current way of doing things and build a new one," he suggested.
It doesn't surprise me that the imperial family is remaining adamant on "staying by the side of the people" by maintaining its wide range of activities over the objections of traditionalists.

Firstly, the traditionalists are still unable to take control of the imperial family. Technically, I suppose Prime Minister Abe has the authority to force the royals to give up their interactions with the public, but that would likely be unpopular with the public, and he has greater policy priorities on which he needs to expend his political capital.

Secondly, all the recent celebrations commemorating emperor Akihito's reign will have given the imperial family the message that the people are grateful to them for standing with them and sharing their joys and sorrows.

Thirdly, as mentioned in the article, Crown Prince Naruhito has indeed talked about the necessity of rethinking royal duties with the times, but his planned "new way" appears to be more expansive, not more restrictive, than his father's. (Here is an interesting old post in regards to this: A German book about Crown Princess Masako)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Hmmm, forgive me for being skeptical. The Abe government has never struck me as a champion of equal rights - on the contrary.
So wonder if this is merely for show?
Abe said (see article) "Because this is an extremely important issue related to the foundation of the nation, we have to give careful consideration to the matter", which is the same line he has been using for the last seven years. He needs only to use it for another 25 years or thereabouts, until Aiko has passed childbearing age ...
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  #1113  
Old 03-24-2019, 03:24 AM
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I agree with you all. I have low/zero expectations the discussions will lead anywhere. However, it'll be mildly interesting to see how similar or different the Abe government's report will be to the Koizumi government's report on female/stable succession.

While looking up info on the Higashikuni family after Nobuhiko Higashikuni's death on March 20th, I learned the Kitashirakawa branch is extinct.

Michihisa Kitashirakawa died on October 20, 2018 at age 81. He had 3 daughters.
Japan wikipedia - Kitashirakawa Michihisa

Slim options for conservatives wishing to restore an ex-Imperial branch.

Ex-Imperial branches with 2 generations of male descendants: Kaya, Higashikuni, and Takeda

At risk ex-Imperial branches...
Fushimi: current head Hiroaki (born 1932) has 3 daughters
Kuni: current head Kuniaki has 2 sons (born 1959 and 1961) but no grandsons
Asaka: current head Tomohiko has a child (born 1972) who is unmarried

Extinct: Nashimoto, Yamashina, Kitashirakawa, Higashifushimi, Kan'in

Recent Takeda family news: Tsunekazu Takeda (age 71) resigned as president of the Japanese Olympic Committee as he's under investigation for alleged bribery in Tokyo's successful 2020 Olympics bid. I saw Western media mention he's Emperor Akihito's second cousin whereas Japanese media omitted that connection.
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  #1114  
Old 03-24-2019, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
I agree with you all. I have low/zero expectations the discussions will lead anywhere. However, it'll be mildly interesting to see how similar or different the Abe government's report will be to the Koizumi government's report on female/stable succession.
Provided that there will be a report... I envision Abe delaying or extending the "discussions" until he leaves office, at which point they can be conveniently put on ice by his hand-picked successor. But I agree, it seems highly unlikely that Abe would allow the gender equal model from the Koizumi government's report to be discussed on his watch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
While looking up info on the Higashikuni family after Nobuhiko Higashikuni's death on March 20th, I learned the Kitashirakawa branch is extinct.

Michihisa Kitashirakawa died on October 20, 2018 at age 81. He had 3 daughters.
Japan wikipedia - Kitashirakawa Michihisa

Slim options for conservatives wishing to restore an ex-Imperial branch.

Ex-Imperial branches with 2 generations of male descendants: Kaya, Higashikuni, and Takeda

At risk ex-Imperial branches...
Fushimi: current head Hiroaki (born 1932) has 3 daughters
Kuni: current head Kuniaki has 2 sons (born 1959 and 1961) but no grandsons
Asaka: current head Tomohiko has a child (born 1972) who is unmarried

Extinct: Nashimoto, Yamashina, Kitashirakawa, Higashifushimi, Kan'in

Recent Takeda family news: Tsunekazu Takeda (age 71) resigned as president of the Japanese Olympic Committee as he's under investigation for alleged bribery in Tokyo's successful 2020 Olympics bid. I saw Western media mention he's Emperor Akihito's second cousin whereas Japanese media omitted that connection.
Thank you for finding this and for pointing out Mr. Takeda's close relation to the emperor. I wonder why Japanese reports omitted it. Were they under the impression that it was commonly known already, or acting out of "respect" for the imperial family?

Even though the conservatives' options are slim, if one applies the same rules to the Takeda family as the Komuro family, then following the allegations about Tsunekazu it ought to be forbidden to elevate any members of the Takeda family to royal status, correct?



It really is incumbent on the imperial family to confront reality and be more flexible on finding a path forward. I'm pleased that the IHA is brainstorming reforms to the schedule of duties, according to the Japan Times in December.
With little prospects for an amendment, the family and the Imperial Household Agency are trying to devise ways within the current legal framework to tackle the mounting burden of having individual royals perform public duties.

Those duties range from visits to disaster-hit areas, trips to mourn the war dead to participation in social, cultural and sports events. In addition, the Emperor is required to carry out state acts such as the promulgation of laws and convocations of the Diet.

Imperial Household Agency officials and experts say some ceremonies could be attended by a single member rather than a couple, and events with similar themes could be consolidated, although state acts and some official activities cannot be curtailed due to constitutional requirement and in view of fairness.

Ayako Moriya, who recently left the Imperial family, retains honorary titles at two organizations even after her marriage, in the first such case for female members who have married commoners.
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/20...clouds-future/

Yamashita says one solution would be to share public duties with members of 11 collateral branches that left the Imperial family in 1947.

“If they are delegated to perform duties related to the Imperial household and such practices continue for a long time, the public may start accepting their return to the Imperial family, and ultimately could view male members as potential heirs of the throne,” he said.

Similar arguments have been made by Abe and his supporters […]

However, I find the suggestions of Mr. Yamashita/Abe's supporters underwhelming. Delegation of royal duties to private citizens would be a clear curtailment of Parliament's prerogative to determine who is a member of the royal family and who is not. If delegation were deemed allowable then it would be more sensible to delegate to the experienced ex-princesses instead of strangers who would be novices at public duties.
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  #1115  
Old 03-29-2019, 05:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
Provided that there will be a report... I envision Abe delaying or extending the "discussions" until he leaves office, at which point they can be conveniently put on ice by his hand-picked successor. But I agree, it seems highly unlikely that Abe would allow the gender equal model from the Koizumi government's report to be discussed on his watch.
Very true... and Japan's government is certainly well-versed in discussing issues forever. They held meetings for 7 years (1997-2004) on female succession before official discussions in 2005 under Koizumi's administration.

Secret meetings were behind Japan's 2005 move to allow female emperor: Kyodo News+
Quote:
The government secretly considered the option of allowing females to ascend Japan's imperial throne from 1997, before officially starting a debate on the issue under a panel of experts in 2005, internal documents and other sources showed Thursday.

While the plan was later dropped, the confidential talks helped lay the groundwork for the government of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, who served between 2001 and 2006, to lean toward revising the Imperial House Law, which allows only male heirs who have emperors on their father's side to reign.

The secret meetings started in 1997 under then Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto and were attended by members such as Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Teijiro Furukawa. At that time, Emperor Akihito had no grandson.

[...]

The meetings continued until 2004 and a document compiled in May that year called on the government to "swiftly start considering" changing the law to allow females and their descendants to ascend the throne.

Koizumi launched an advisory panel on the issue, which wrapped up its nearly one year of discussions in 2005 by proposing that female monarchs be allowed, in a bid to avoid an expected succession crisis for the world's oldest hereditary monarchy.

Koizumi was eager to pursue the proposal, but the plan fizzled out following the birth in 2006 of Prince Hisahito [...]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
Thank you for finding this and for pointing out Mr. Takeda's close relation to the emperor. I wonder why Japanese reports omitted it. Were they under the impression that it was commonly known already, or acting out of "respect" for the imperial family?
I suspect the latter, the IHA is quite powerful and no media would risk losing access by embarrassing the royal family about their demoted relations. Despite that power, I find the IHA's handling of controversies / scandals quite poor. Aiko's bullying in elementary school / absences, Aiko's minor health updates (do we really need to know she had a fever/cold and missed a few days of school?), any royals' minor health status (Princess Yoko hurting her knee after an anemia episode), and most recently Kei Komuro. I'd love for the IHA to join social media but they'd probably make a mess of it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
Even though the conservatives' options are slim, if one applies the same rules to the Takeda family as the Komuro family, then following the allegations about Tsunekazu it ought to be forbidden to elevate any members of the Takeda family to royal status, correct?
Indeed. Also, Tsunekazu was at fault in a 1974 car accident that killed a 22-year-old woman. He was not prosecuted, instead compensating the victim's family.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
It really is incumbent on the imperial family to confront reality and be more flexible on finding a path forward. I'm pleased that the IHA is brainstorming reforms to the schedule of duties, according to the Japan Times in December.
I wish solo activities for Imperial women were considered years ago, especially for Masako. Imagine if she had been allowed patronages or something.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
However, I find the suggestions of Mr. Yamashita/Abe's supporters underwhelming. Delegation of royal duties to private citizens would be a clear curtailment of Parliament's prerogative to determine who is a member of the royal family and who is not. If delegation were deemed allowable then it would be more sensible to delegate to the experienced ex-princesses instead of strangers who would be novices at public duties.
It's exhausting how far the conservatives will go...
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  #1116  
Old 04-21-2019, 03:23 AM
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Record-high 76% say they are familiar with the imperial family: The Asahi Shimbun
Quote:
[...]

The survey was conducted nationwide by mail from March to April ahead of the enthronement of a new emperor on May 1. Of 3,000 people who received the mail, 2,043, or 68 percent, gave valid responses.

[...]

By sex, 73 percent of men and 79 percent of women replied in the latest survey that they were familiar with the imperial family. Among women in their 40s and higher age groups, the answer exceeded 80 percent. In particular, women in their 50s, the same age group as Masako, marked the highest rate of 84 percent.

By age group, 60 percent of respondents aged 18 to 29 years old said they were familiar with the imperial family. On the other hand, corresponding figures among those in their 50s, 60s and the age group of 70 and older were 81 percent, 80 percent and 79 percent, respectively.

[...]

Respondents were also asked whether they support female emperors and “jokei-tenno,” or children who were born between female emperors and non-imperial family men and later became emperors.

Seventy-six percent and 74 percent of respondents support allowing female emperors and jokei-tenno, respectively.

The respondents were also asked whether female members of the imperial family should be allowed to establish “miyake” branch families after marriage so that they can remain in the imperial family.

Fifty percent supported the idea, while 37 percent opposed it.
Talks on Imperial succession rules may be delayed until next fall or spring | The Japan Times
Quote:
Some government officials are calling for deferring discussions on stable Imperial succession until the events related to Emperor Akihito’s abdication and Crown Prince Naruhito’s enthronement are over in spring 2020, sources said Tuesday.

[...]

If the government postpones the discussions, it may face criticism from opposition parties. But because conservatives — the main supporters of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe — oppose changing the rules, succession talks are highly likely to be fractious, observers say.

The ruling Liberal Democratic Party also hopes to refrain from holding discussions on the matter, which could divide its members, ahead of this summer’s elections for the House of Councilors, sources said.

[...]

A resolution attached to the special law to enable the Emperor’s abdication stipulates that the government should start discussions on stable Imperial succession soon after the law takes effect on April 30, when the Emperor will step down, and promptly report the results to the Diet.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga has said he wants the government to launch the discussions not long after the enthronement, scheduled for May 1. (I think the article meant May 1 ascension or October 22 enthronement)

[...]

The abdication- and enthronement-related state events [...] end with the Rikkoshi no Rei ceremony on April 19, 2020, proclaiming Prince Akishino [...] as first in line to the throne.

A government source said, “We don’t want discussions on stable Imperial succession to heat up” and the talks “will be kicked off after the Rikkoshi no Rei ceremony.”

The speaker of the House of Representatives, Tadamori Oshima, said in a speech on Monday that he wants the government to initiate the talks after related ceremonies end this fall.

One government official said it would be difficult for the government to win public acceptance for postponing the discussions for a year.

Given this, the government is expected to seek the best timing for such talks while paying close attention to public opinion, observers said.
Hmph. Conservatives solidifying Prince Akishino as Crown Prince before discussions and will probably pick a "best time" when interest is low.
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  #1117  
Old 04-21-2019, 03:43 AM
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That makes sense.

For whatever reasons the Japanese have for voting for the current national-conservative government, female succession is pretty far down the list.
Hence why the government can, shall we say, stall the issue.
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  #1118  
Old 04-21-2019, 06:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prisma View Post
Record-high 76% say they are familiar with the imperial family: The Asahi Shimbun


Talks on Imperial succession rules may be delayed until next fall or spring | The Japan Times

Hmph. Conservatives solidifying Prince Akishino as Crown Prince before discussions and will probably pick a "best time" when interest is low.
Good point! As someone also pointed out in Princess Mako's engagement thread, Abe and his allies have demonstrated considerable skill at using their control of the terms of debate to win many of the battles concerning the imperial family: nationalist politics, treating Akihito's abdication as an exception, female succession, female-headed branches, the attacks on Kei Komuro…

Quote:
Seventy-six percent and 74 percent of respondents support allowing female emperors and jokei-tenno, respectively.

The respondents were also asked whether female members of the imperial family should be allowed to establish “miyake” branch families after marriage so that they can remain in the imperial family.

Fifty percent supported the idea, while 37 percent opposed it.
I would like them to have investigated the (at least) 24% of people who support female-line emperors but don't wish to allow female-headed branches.

Does the concept of a future emperor being brought up as a commoner appeal to them? I imagine that would be satisfying to Abe's ears, since it would facilitate his desire to elevate commoners from former collateral branch families into the imperial family.

Or are the 24% prepared to allow a branch headed by a future empress, but not by the other princesses of the imperial family? That seems to me to be a risky strategy. Imagine, for instance, that Hisahito had never existed and as a consequence Aiko had become crown princess. If the other princesses were prohibited from remaining in the imperial family after marriage, what would they plan to do if Crown Princess Aiko and her husband were unable to have children? By the point that they discovered their infertility, it is likely that Mako and Kako, both of whom are older than Aiko, would have married and become commoners.
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  #1119  
Old 04-26-2019, 01:34 PM
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Possible reasons for the disconnect between higher support for female emperor and lower support for female-led branches:
- More imperial branches is daunting. The survey didn't specify who could stay or how many generations. Financially supporting all the male and female-led imperial branches and later their children's branches (no matter how distant from the current emperor) gets expensive.

- Influence of Japan's strict gender roles. Wives join the husband's family registry after marriage. Adult adoption typically happens when a family lacks an suitable heir so a son-in-law joins his wife's family registry.

- Maybe those surveyed are OK with direct inheritance but prefer limitations on branches for siblings or relatives which the survey didn't specify. Outside of princesses leaving the family on marriage, no one has ceded from the Imperial family. The late Prince Tomohito of Mikasa wanted to leave but couldn't.

Japan to consider Imperial succession issue after November: Suga - The Mainichi
Quote:
[...]

"Our first priority is to dedicate ourselves to successfully hold rituals related to the enthronement including Daijosai," commented Suga on the timing to initiate deliberations on the succession issue.

[...]

Abe previously insisted reinstating male descendants in the male line from houses which left the Imperial Family under the occupation of the General Headquarters of the Allied Forces (GHQ) after World War II. Regarding Abe's opinion, Suga limited himself to say, "We will discuss the matter later. I refrain from commenting."
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  #1120  
Old 04-26-2019, 02:22 PM
Muhler's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
Posts: 13,660
Hmm, that smells like another poor excuse for keeping women away from the throne.

But that problem has been addressed in other monarchies in various ways, so why not in Japan?
After all most monarchies today have only three or four active couples, the rest are left to create their own careers.

As for gender roles. Well if you marry an active royal, you marry into the royal family, rather than the other way around. - Another poor excuse IMO.

What would they do if there was only Princess Aiko? Sorry, you marry into your husbands family and as such you have to abdicate, and whoops now we have no empress and no monarchy...
Come on!
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