The Royal Forums Coat of Arms


Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #541  
Old 03-14-2021, 08:57 PM
Fem's Avatar
Fem Fem is offline
Courtier
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: UK, Poland
Posts: 711
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heavs View Post
Maybe they think it needed to be said after a year of Covid? Maybe William is feeling his mother’s loss very acutely with everything going on? Maybe it really is an unsubtle “don’t hijack her just for you, Harry!” shot? Maybe he just really wanted them to do a tribute? Maybe Charlotte and George wanted to as they did cards to everyone else? No doubt PR was also a factor but that can be applied even in normal times.
Before anyone jumps at me, this is a joke, but maybe the Cambridges were desperate for finding the little ones something to do?

But I do agree with you. Over the last few years there was so many talk about how "Harry is his mother's son" that I could hardly remember Diana had one more son... So maybe William needed a little pick me up after this year and this week, and what's better than handmade cards remembering his mother from his own children?

This was lovely and I'm so glad the Cambridges are feeling comfortable with sharing these kind of things/moments publicly. The cards, the cake, it did bring a smile to my face.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #542  
Old 03-14-2021, 09:16 PM
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 1,849
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathia_sophia View Post
Lovely cards! However, the Diana part is a bit "odd". I understand the purpose of mother's day and William remembering his dear mother. But I fail to understand the kids' part, because they clearly wrote what their parents told them to. How can you miss someone you never met? I have no doubts that William shares many stories of his mother with his children, but that's not my point if you know what I mean....
I imagine after George was born Kate and William would bring him to the Middletons’ for Mother’s Day visits and my guess would be the cards to Diana “from George” began at the same time, as a way to help William more than anything. It must have been bittersweet for him to see Kate’s mother no doubt fall in love with George, and then Charlotte and Louis, and have the chance to experience so much with them, knowing that he’d never get a chance to see his mother do the same.

I don’t think their parents told them what to write. The cards sound like what you’d expect from children of George and Charlotte’s age when you’ve sat them down and asked them what they’d like to write for Granny Diana’s card this year. “I love you.” “I miss you.” “Papa misses you.” To a certain extent they’re probably parroting back things William has told when he’s talked to them about Diana, but that’s how kids learn to express their feelings.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #543  
Old 03-14-2021, 09:27 PM
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Torrance, United States
Posts: 5,190
Fem-Wouldn't be surprised to see one or both parents organizing little surprises for the mother and grandmothers. Until they're old enough to create something without some supervision from parents, yes they'll need some adults to help oversee. Wouldn't be surprised if William helped out with the cake for Catherine or at least asked for some advice from the family's housekeeper. His cooking/baking skills just might have improved from those days at St. Andrews.
Reply With Quote
  #544  
Old 03-14-2021, 10:13 PM
Sunnystar's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Oregon, United States
Posts: 629
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
A great PR exercise by Kensington Palace for Mother’s Day UK. Anyone looking at that cake would know that a seven and five year old couldnt be responsible for it. They may both have stirred the mixture and stuck some of the decorations on top, I don’t know, but I do know that was not baked by primary school kids, let alone a two year old. Probably baked IMO in the KP apartment kitchen by domestic staff.
Huh? The only part of that cake that I questioned being done by the kids was the frosting on the top. The rest of it looked like a fairly standard, 2-layer cake that you would bake in a round pan and remove after it's cooled. Not something too hard for kids Charlotte & George's age to handle with some parental supervision. Even the frosting could have been homemade (again, not hard) though I do suspect as neat as the piping was that a parent handled that part while the other one supervised making the pipette hearts. Really, my nieces and nephew made cakes like that at that age with the supervision of their older family members.
Reply With Quote
  #545  
Old 03-14-2021, 10:21 PM
Majesty
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 8,390
I disagree. I’ve had three kids, have four grandchildren including six year old twins who are quite independent. I don’t think, or believe that the pictured cake was made by a seven and five year old. I just don’t. MO.
Reply With Quote
  #546  
Old 03-14-2021, 11:02 PM
CrownPrincessJava's Avatar
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: ,, Australia
Posts: 1,049
Quote:
Originally Posted by kathia_sophia View Post
Lovely cards! However, the Diana part is a bit "odd". I understand the purpose of mother's day and William remembering his dear mother. But I fail to understand the kids' part, because they clearly wrote what their parents told them to. How can you miss someone you never met? I have no doubts that William shares many stories of his mother with his children, but that's not my point if you know what I mean.


I used cursive writing as a child. I think all kids in Elementary School use cursive in Portugal. But when you go to Middle School that changes a bit. I began using computers and phone when I went to Middle School and that influenced my writing. Though that was 20 years ago...
I agree. When I saw the cards, I was uncomfortable, because clearly they are used as PR and as what Kathia-Sophia wrote. The cake is very obviously made by someone in KP with the children decorating it, but it is still sweet.

I would have preferred to see the kid's card to Catherine and William writing a card like that for his mum. Then it would have felt less PR-like
Reply With Quote
  #547  
Old 03-14-2021, 11:23 PM
Eskimo's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Dallas, United States
Posts: 570
Charlotte’s message makes sense. Papa is missing you and I love you (presumably because Papa loves you and I love papa). George’s is a bit muddled.

For those wondering if this is PR... EVERYTHING any of the RF put out for public consumption is PR. They know how this game is played.

Also, I’m sure the kids had some help make the cake (or were not involved in the baking process at all)
Reply With Quote
  #548  
Old 03-14-2021, 11:38 PM
Osipi's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: On the west side of North up from Back, United States
Posts: 16,750
I've learned never to underestimate what a child can do. As a Brownie Girl Scout leader (ages 6-8), these girls planned a "King for a Day" feast for their fathers and actually did cook the entire meal themselves (with supervision of course) and set the tables and seated their dads (with crowns on) and served the meal. Us women leaders then remained upstairs while the dinner was in progress and let the party go on. They also cleaned up all the mess (basically) and went home with their daddies. It was a huge success.

I've been down and out and restricted by my doctor from doing *anything* and had a defrosted turkey in the refrigerator. I was able to sit at a kitchen table and direct my three young kids (oldest was around 8 or 9 at the time) to make the entire turkey dinner. It was fun. Send the turkey swimming (rinsing the bird completely), feed him well (stuff it) and then send it camping in a tent (to the oven!). The side dishes were basic ones but we *did* have a turkey dinner and the kids were so proud that they did it themselves. It was a close family thing and its one that hasn't ever been forgotten. Its not how it was done or how properly it was done but the reason it was done. That's what matters in a family. My kids actually used to fight over who got to help mom make the dinners. It was a totally different story thought when it came to doing the dirty dishes though.

ETA: I forgot to mention that the entire troop went shopping for all the ingredients needed to make the dinner for the dads. That was part of the planning.
__________________
To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment. ~~ Ralph Waldo Emerson ~~
Reply With Quote
  #549  
Old 03-14-2021, 11:43 PM
Nobility
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Posts: 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
I disagree. I’ve had three kids, have four grandchildren including six year old twins who are quite independent. I don’t think, or believe that the pictured cake was made by a seven and five year old. I just don’t. MO.
I'm in the opinion that Catherine had a hand in making that cake with some "participation" from the kids.

But it's not impossible for a kid at George's age to bake. There's this TV Show called Masterchef Junior, one of the youngest winner was 9 years old girl. In on season, an 8 years old girl managed to reach the big 4. Seriously, some of those kids are better cook than me.
Reply With Quote
  #550  
Old 03-14-2021, 11:53 PM
Nobility
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: N/A, Bulgaria
Posts: 440
My five-year-old niece can and has baked cakes like this, minus the frosting. Adult part in it is mostly making sure that she doesn't send anything flying over the edge of the kitchen counter and steadying her hand from time to time. If I could have nailed the bowls and pans down to the counter, I would have. She also isn't allowed to actually approach the oven.



She gets it from her mum, though. Neither her dad nor I could do such a thing until we were ten or something. That is to say, it depends on the kid.
Reply With Quote
  #551  
Old 03-15-2021, 12:03 AM
moby's Avatar
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,203
I think the Mother's Day cards to Diana were a nice way to bring to light the recent shift towards remembering the dead on these occasions and acknowledging the grief they bring for a lot of people whose mothers are long gone. I do think they put a lot of thought into bringing this reality to light, especially with the pandemic having taken away lots of mothers, without exploiting the Diana connection. Hence why they posted a photo of Catherine and Carole but no photo of William and Diana.

So I find it a great idea to make it about the grandkids and how it is their loss too, rather than William speaking about his grief, though like his brother he has every right to do so. Unfortunately that would have been picked apart and seen to compete with Harry's more recent comments on the subject.

About the cake, of course the kids didn't make that! How many parents or aunts and uncles post photos of pastries "baked" by their kids/nieces/nephews when all the latter did was mix the ingredients together.
Reply With Quote
  #552  
Old 03-15-2021, 01:30 AM
Lady Daly's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Sherwood, United States
Posts: 677
Thank you for posting these sweet cards, exemplary parenting skills from the Cambridges.
Reply With Quote
  #553  
Old 03-15-2021, 01:52 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Middle of Nowhere, United States
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erin9 View Post
When I saw the cards it reminded me a bit of seeing HM and Philip looking at the card George, Charlotte and Louis made for their anniversary.

That is what I thought of too.
Reply With Quote
  #554  
Old 03-15-2021, 04:45 AM
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Manchester, United Kingdom
Posts: 1,469
I'm sure we're not meant to think that they baked the cake with no help. You wouldn't let children that age near a hot oven without supervision, apart from anything else.


Interesting that they call Prince William "Papa". It's very, very unusual now: even for Prince Charles's generation, it was unusual. Not that I'd thought about it much, but I'd have assumed they called him "Daddy". I assume they call Catherine "Mummy" and not "Mama".


It's so hard to explain to a child about a grandparent they never met. They probably call Camilla "Grandma" or "Granny", unless they call her "Auntie Camilla", and we know how close they are to Carole, and it must always be bittersweet for William, knowing that Diana will never know them. With what would have been her 60th birthday coming up, maybe he thought that this was the right year to do this.
Reply With Quote
  #555  
Old 03-15-2021, 05:12 AM
AC21091968's Avatar
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 1,440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alison H View Post
I'm sure we're not meant to think that they baked the cake with no help. You wouldn't let children that age near a hot oven without supervision, apart from anything else.


Interesting that they call Prince William "Papa". It's very, very unusual now: even for Prince Charles's generation, it was unusual. Not that I'd thought about it much, but I'd have assumed they called him "Daddy". I assume they call Catherine "Mummy" and not "Mama".


It's so hard to explain to a child about a grandparent they never met. They probably call Camilla "Grandma" or "Granny", unless they call her "Auntie Camilla", and we know how close they are to Carole, and it must always be bittersweet for William, knowing that Diana will never know them. With what would have been her 60th birthday coming up, maybe he thought that this was the right year to do this.
It seems that "Papa" and "Mama" are more prominent in the royal family. Princess Eugenie on most occasion called her parents "Papa" and "Mumma" on instagram rather than "Daddy" and "Mummy". Perhaps Papa/Mumma sounds more "grown-up" than Daddy and Mummy, but not too formal as father and mother.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CMZ-DkcFFMf/
https://www.instagram.com/p/B8wkaSTF_Is/
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzx4T3QFzjw/
https://www.instagram.com/p/ByLYyFuFZdp/
https://www.instagram.com/p/B-CenzKlB2J/
https://www.instagram.com/p/B3pZW1aFYDT/

However, there are some occasions when Eugenie address her parents differently (i.e. Pups, mumsy, father, mother)
https://www.instagram.com/p/ByxhKU9F6mi/
https://www.instagram.com/p/CGXRK26Fj9O/
https://www.instagram.com/p/CBtOPaylvvc/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BgLiVPygkQN/
Reply With Quote
  #556  
Old 03-15-2021, 05:15 AM
SLV's Avatar
SLV SLV is offline
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1,678
Of course the children baked the cake with (a lot of ) help from their mother. Let them stirr the batter three times and they wil proudly say that they made it. Little Louis could even claim that he helped, because he was allowed to lick off the remaining batter of the spoon.
Baking with children is fun, seeing their proud faces when presenting the result is amazing.
And of course posting the drawings and cake is PR, that is how things work. I can image that W&C asked George and Charlotte permission to post their creations, they are old (and smart) enough to grasp the basics of these things.
I do think it is weird that they would write that they love and miss their grandmother. You cannot really love/miss someone you have never known. The 'papa misses you' makes much more sense.
I applaud their handwriting!! Schools here in the Netherlands are starting to switch from cursive into 'bookletters' more and more. Which makes sense, when learning letters, but means children have terrible handwriting. After moving house and school, my girls (then 7&9) are now in a school that still teaches cursive. They couldn't even read it and especially my eldest daughter's handwriting is horrible. The other uses now a mix of cursive and bookletters, and is slighty better.
Reply With Quote
  #557  
Old 03-15-2021, 05:19 AM
SLV's Avatar
SLV SLV is offline
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1,678
In Dutch we use papa/mama too (pron. pápa/máma), but I am curious how the RF pronounces it. I think I remember Diana say pápa when talking about the (then) boys calling their father, but in British costume drama's like Pride and Prejudice they say papá.
Do we know?
Reply With Quote
  #558  
Old 03-15-2021, 08:06 AM
Osipi's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: On the west side of North up from Back, United States
Posts: 16,750
As young kid, my brother blurted out and called my grandmother and grandfather "Mimi and Pipi". It stuck for some reason and all the other groups in the family said Grandma and Grandpa. My mom and dad when I had kids ended up being Grammy and Bumpa. Kids sometimes come up with their very own special names.

Just because a child never met one of his grandmothers, it doesn't mean that they aren't very real to them. How many children identify so easily with fictional characters such as Elsa or Ariel or Peter Pan? If the parent keeps the memory alive of their mother with their children, that person can and does become very real to them. The point being that George, Charlotte and Louis know there's Granny Diana and Granny Carol and Gran Camilla and Gan-Gan. When they're old enough, they'll understand the concept of death. Its a gradual process.

On that note as an aside. There is a wonderful children's book that I give out to friends with kids that have lost a loved one. It's called "The Fall Of Freddy The Leaf" by Leo Buscalgia.
__________________
To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment. ~~ Ralph Waldo Emerson ~~
Reply With Quote
  #559  
Old 03-15-2021, 08:55 AM
Jacknch's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Suffolk, United Kingdom
Posts: 9,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLV View Post
In Dutch we use papa/mama too (pron. pápa/máma), but I am curious how the RF pronounces it. I think I remember Diana say pápa when talking about the (then) boys calling their father, but in British costume drama's like Pride and Prejudice they say papá.
Do we know?
The first vowel is usually very short and second vowel longer - so.. p'pa and m'ma with the last part rhyming exactly like "far"
__________________
JACK
Reply With Quote
  #560  
Old 03-15-2021, 09:58 AM
SLV's Avatar
SLV SLV is offline
Royal Highness
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 1,678
So, with the emphasis on the first 'pa', just like we do. Thanks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacknch View Post
The first vowel is usually very short and second vowel longer - so.. p'pa and m'ma with the last part rhyming exactly like "far"
__________________

Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Prince George and Princess Charlotte, General News Part 3: May 2016-April 2018 JessRulz Current Events Archive 650 04-23-2018 07:43 AM




Popular Tags
america archie mountbatten-windsor asia asian baby names birth britain britannia british royal family camilla camilla parker-bowles camilla parker bowles carolin china china chinese ming dynasty asia asian emperor royalty qing chinese clarence house colorblindness commonwealth countries coronation customs duchess of sussex duke of cambridge duke of sussex edward vii elizabeth ii family life family tree fashion and style gemstones george vi gradenigo hello! henry viii highgrove hochberg house of windsor hypothetical monarchs jack brooksbank japan jewellery kensington palace książ castle liechtenstein lili mountbatten-windsor line of succession list of rulers medical monarchist movements monarchists mongolia mountbatten nara period pless politics portugal prince harry princess eugenie queen elizabeth ii queen louise royal ancestry royalty of taiwan solomon j solomon spanish royal family suthida taiwan thai royal family tradition united states of america wales


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:27 PM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2021
Jelsoft Enterprises
×