The Royal Forums Coat of Arms


Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #521  
Old 07-26-2020, 04:05 PM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: St Thomas, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands
Posts: 2,595


But as Queen Claude noted, the couple perform relatively well in the popularity polling even as their ratings are relatively low in the liability poll. A respondent viewing a royal as a liability to the monarchy does not automatically imply viewing them as unlikeable, especially as Britons are not undivided on the value of the monarchy. For some of those who would prefer the monarchy to give way to a republic, being a liability to the monarchy may very well be an added reason to like, not dislike, a royal.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #522  
Old 07-26-2020, 04:34 PM
Somebody's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Somewhere, Suriname
Posts: 4,678
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post


But as Queen Claude noted, the couple perform relatively well in the popularity polling even as their ratings are relatively low in the liability poll. A respondent viewing a royal as a liability to the monarchy does not automatically imply viewing them as unlikeable, especially as Britons are not undivided on the value of the monarchy. For some of those who would prefer the monarchy to give way to a republic, being a liability to the monarchy may very well be an added reason to like, not dislike, a royal.
Given that it's rolling data and about HALF of the data are from before their bomb shell announcement, I don't think that it tells us that much about their current popularity. And while technically these things are indeed different; based on the split up between different groups I see little reason why large numbers people would on the one hand have 'a positive opinion' of someone while also stating that same person is a 'liability' (more likely someone would consider that person an 'asset'); or on the other hand have a negative opinion but consider him/her an asset.

So comparing the numbers of July 2019-July 2020 with those of July 2020:
Harry:
1-year data: 54% positive opinion; 22% negative opinion; 23% neutral opinion
15-16 July data: 37% an asset; 38% a liability; 17% neither; 8% don't know

Meghan:
1-year data: 37% positive opinion; 35% negative opinion; 23% neutral opinion
15-16 July data: 24% an asset; 51% a liability; 17% neither; 8% don't know

So, I would say that especially Meghan also polls quite badly in the 1-year 'popularity' data with about as many people having a positive opinion of her as those having a negative opinion - and as can be seen from more recent data is has become worse. The only person that has a higher % of 'negative opinion' is Andrew... anyone else below her 9th spot (out of 15) seems less known and therefore has fewer people with an opinion (except again for Andrew)
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #523  
Old 07-26-2020, 05:04 PM
Majesty
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,307
Here is a YouGov poll from August 2019, in which Harry is second behind the Queen but ahead of both William and Kate.

https://www.townandcountrymag.com/so...als-poll-2019/

Another one from YouGov from 2018, in which Harry just pips the Queen for top spot.

https://www.vanityfair.com/style/201...-popular-royal
Reply With Quote
  #524  
Old 07-26-2020, 05:42 PM
Duc_et_Pair's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: City, Netherlands
Posts: 10,377
There is a gigantic wrong-thinking in this thread. It compares apples to oranges. Someone's popularity is not congruent to support for the monarchy, the topic of this thread.

Support for the monarchy = do you prefer the current situation in which the head of state is determined by hereditary birthright?

Popularity = which royal do you like best?

In almost all monarchies the popularity of individual members is higher than the support for the institution itself, which only underlines how this thread (support for the monarchy) is hijacked by superficial polls about individuals.

For an example, in the Netherlands the royal couple themselves score fabulous approval ratings. But asked about support for the monarchy itself: it is declining, year after year. Decade after decade. Unstoppable. Despite the HUGE popularity of current individual royals.
Reply With Quote
  #525  
Old 07-26-2020, 05:46 PM
Somebody's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Somewhere, Suriname
Posts: 4,678
Given that the 'popularity' is rolling data it might be helpful for future reference to present the current data of the 15 people in the list.

I'll not only present the 'positive opinions' (P) but also the negative opinions (N) and the neutral opinions (X) (the remaining percentages indicated 'I don't know' - as the person had never heard of said royal); the final number will be the approval rating [] based on positive minus negative opinion.

1. Queen Elizabeth: P: 74%; N: 9%; X: 16% [65% approval]
2. The Duke of Cambridge: P: 65%; N: 10%; X: 22% [55% approval]
3. The Duchess of Cambridge: P: 65%; N: 10%; X: 20% [55% approval]
4. The Duke of Sussex: P: 54%; N: 22%; X: 23% [32% approval]
5. The Princess Royal: P: 50%; N: 15%; X: 30% [35% approval]
6. The Prince of Wales: P: 47%; N: 23%; X: 29% [24% approval]
7. The Duke of Edinburgh: P: 46%; N: 25%; X: 26% [21% approval]
8. Mrs. Michael Tindall: P: 39%; N: 14%; X: 35% [25% approval]
9. The Duchess of Sussex: P: 37%; N: 35%; X: 23% [2% approval]
10. The Countess of Wessex: P: 31%; N: 11%; X: 33% [20% approval]
11. The Duchess of Cornwall: P: 30%; N: 31%; X: 33% [1% disapproval]
12. The Earl of Wessex: P: 26%; N: 26%; 37% [0% approval]
13. Princess Eugenie: P: 26%; N: 27%; X: 35% [1% disapproval
14. Princess Beatrice: P: 26%; N: 27%; X: 37% [1% disapproval]
15. The Duke of York: P: 12%; N: 61%; X: 21% [49% disapproval]

Notes:
* It seems the duke and duchess of Cambridge are lumped together; either respondents have a positive opinion (about 2/3rds) or they have a negative opinion (15%).
* It seems the York-sisters are just lumped together. Most likely respondents either indicated they liked both or disliked both. Their numbers are also very comparable to Edward's numbers: so, it could (at least partly) mostly reflect a general feel about the monarchy/lesser-known royals than specifically be about them.

So, if the approval rating would be used to determine popularity, the list would be slightly different:
person had never heard of said royal); the final number will be the approval rating [] based on positive minus negative opinion.

1. Queen Elizabeth: P: 74%; N: 9%; X: 16% [65% approval]
2. The Duke of Cambridge: P: 65%; N: 10%; X: 22% [55% approval]
2. The Duchess of Cambridge: P: 65%; N: 10%; X: 20% [55% approval]

4. The Princess Royal: P: 50%; N: 15%; X: 30% [35% approval]
5. The Duke of Sussex: P: 54%; N: 22%; X: 23% [32% approval]

6. Mrs. Michael Tindall: P: 39%; N: 14%; X: 35% [25% approval]
7. The Prince of Wales: P: 47%; N: 23%; X: 29% [24% approval]
8. The Duke of Edinburgh: P: 46%; N: 25%; X: 26% [21% approval]
9. The Countess of Wessex: P: 31%; N: 11%; X: 33% [20% approval]

10. The Duchess of Sussex: P: 37%; N: 35%; X: 23% [2% approval]
11. The Earl of Wessex: P: 26%; N: 26%; 37% [0% approval]
12. The Duchess of Cornwall: P: 30%; N: 31%; X: 33% [1% disapproval]
12. Princess Eugenie: P: 26%; N: 27%; X: 35% [1% disapproval
12. Princess Beatrice: P: 26%; N: 27%; X: 37% [1% disapproval]
15. The Duke of York: P: 12%; N: 61%; X: 21% [49% disapproval]

With Harry, Meghan and Camilla dropping one spot and Anne, Zara and Edward gaining one spot. As there are always error margins, I've tried to group the various royals with comparable numbers together by color.
Reply With Quote
  #526  
Old 07-26-2020, 05:51 PM
Somebody's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Somewhere, Suriname
Posts: 4,678
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
Here is a YouGov poll from August 2019, in which Harry is second behind the Queen but ahead of both William and Kate.

https://www.townandcountrymag.com/so...als-poll-2019/

Another one from YouGov from 2018, in which Harry just pips the Queen for top spot.

https://www.vanityfair.com/style/201...-popular-royal
Thanks, that's helpful!

So, in the 6-months after his marriage about 77% had a positive opinion of him; around the time of his son's birth it had dropped to 71%; and now it's at 54% (including data of a year ago - so it's unlikely his lowest number).

Unfortunately, they only report 'positive opinion'; as to me the 'negative opinion' completes the picture but of course it can never be higher than whatever adds up to 100% - and typically between 20% and 35% are neutral.
Reply With Quote
  #527  
Old 07-26-2020, 06:08 PM
Somebody's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Somewhere, Suriname
Posts: 4,678
What's also interesting in the YouGov-popularity poll are the correlations:

What other royals are popular, if someone likes ... (first three show highest correlation, last three show lowest correlation):
The Queen: William, Catherine, Anne (least: Beatrice, Edward, Eugenie)
Philip: Charles, Queen, Anne (least: Eugenie, Meghan, Catherine)

William: Catherine, Queen, Anne (least: Philip, Edward, Andrew)
Catherine: William, Queen, Harry (least: Sophie, Edward, Philip)

Harry: Catherine, William, Meghan (least: Sophie, Edward, Andrew)
Meghan: Catherine, Eugenie, Harry (least: Philip, Andrew, Edward)

Charles: Philip, Queen, Anne (least: Eugenie, Harry, Meghan)
Camilla: Andrew, Catherine, Sophie (least: Anne, Harry, Eugenie)

Anne: Zara, Queen, William (least: Meghan, Eugenie, Camilla)
Zara: Anne, Edward, Eugenie (least: Philip, Andrew, Meghan)

Edward: Sophie, Charles, Zara (least: William, Harry, Meghan)
Sophie: Edward, Beatrice, Queen (least: Meghan, Philip, Harry)

Andrew: Beatrice, Camilla, Edward (least: Meghan, Harry, William)
Beatrice: Eugenie, Andrew, Sophie (least: Queen, Harry, Meghan)
Eugenie: Beatrice, Meghan, Zara (least: Camilla, Philip, Queen)

Some of these lists are rather interesting and unexpected!
Reply With Quote
  #528  
Old 07-26-2020, 06:30 PM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: St Thomas, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands
Posts: 2,595
Thank you for presenting the data in an easy to read form!

As someone pointed out previously, excepting the Duke of York, even the least popular family members included in the poll have approximately as many positive opinions to balance the negative opinions, which is good news for the family.
Reply With Quote
  #529  
Old 07-27-2020, 04:44 AM
Duc_et_Pair's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: City, Netherlands
Posts: 10,377
This diarrhoea of popularity polls on individual members of the royal family (including even somone as Mrs Michael Tindall) still does not give the answer on the topic of this thread: support for the monarchy in the UK.
Reply With Quote
  #530  
Old 08-03-2020, 08:54 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 8
I found a YouGov poll conducted on 30th July, where the sample size was 2526 and question was "Generally speaking, how much attention, if any at all, do you pay when a member of the royal family passes comment on a current issue?"

A lot of attention: 2%
A fair amount of attention: 17%
Not much attention: 44%
No attention at all: 32%
Don't know: 4%

The question doesn't necessary ask on the support for the monarchy itself directly, but more so on whether or not royal family members should or even could express their opinions on social and political issue.

I vividly remember some British political Youtubers, who have said along the lines with "Most British public don't talk about the royal family on a day-to-day basis", which kind of reflect this YouGov poll.

I have yet find a recent poll that directly ask "Should the UK become a Republic? or remain a constitutional monarchy?"

https://yougov.co.uk/topics/arts/sur.../07/29/aede6/3

BTW this is my first post on this forum and thank you for your warm welcome

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duc_et_Pair View Post
This diarrhoea of popularity polls on individual members of the royal family (including even somone as Mrs Michael Tindall) still does not give the answer on the topic of this thread: support for the monarchy in the UK.
I found one YouGov poll that answers my own question in the previous post, but this was conducted on 19th February before the pandemic lock down and Sussexes officially leaving full-time royal duties. Apologies if this was posted earlier.

The question was "Do you think that Britain should continue to have a monarchy, or not?". The sample size was 3142

It should: 62%
It should not: 22%
Don't know: 16%

The two major discriminative factors were politics and region (although the results were consistent across England). In Scotland, the results were

It should: 44%
It should not: 34%
Don't know: 22%

I think Brexit was the main reason why the support is lower in Scotland, given that the poll was done less than three weeks after 31st January.

It would be interesting see the result at the end of this year.
Reply With Quote
  #531  
Old 08-03-2020, 10:05 AM
Majesty
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,307
Nicola Sturgeon at the time of the referendum of Scottish Independence made it clear that the question of the Head of State in Scotland was an entirely different question. Similarly Scotland's vote on Brexit had nothing to do with the monarchy's position in that country.

I've noted polls on the monarchy in Scotland for many years and it has always been lower than in England. Just as polls on the monarchy show less support in the cities and large towns of the north of England than in the Home Counties.
Reply With Quote
  #532  
Old 08-03-2020, 10:21 PM
Leopoldine's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: New York, United States
Posts: 693
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyDrx View Post
Unpopular opinion, but I think a boring royal makes a better Monarch than a fun or glamorous royal. Just look at the state of the various heirs and spares in the BRF, while the spares tend to be more fun, glamorous and popular, they are also more prone to scandals than the boring heirs.

I think that was Bradford's conclusion.
Reply With Quote
  #533  
Old 08-03-2020, 10:57 PM
Majesty
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,307
Like the 'glamorous' Edward VIII and Bertie the Duke of York? Edward VII and Edward VIII were mired in scandals in their day, while their siblings by and large settled down to fairly humdrum lives, in Britain and abroad. None of George V's surviving siblings were ever caught up in anything untoward, and Prince Charles has himself not been immune to controversy and scandal over the years.

Plus, it's not unknown for a popular and admired monarch to slide into disrepute in later years. Look at the current Spanish situation with Juan Carlos, who was considered a model of probity for decades.
Reply With Quote
  #534  
Old 08-03-2020, 11:11 PM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: London, United Kingdom
Posts: 2,274
I think when the Queen dies the BRF won't last long. In a lot of peoples eyes the Queen IS the British Monarchy and no one coming behind her has a lot of support. I think already that most people in the UK have no great interest in the royals and think of Kings and Queens in the 21st century as a joke but the boat won't be rocked in her lifetime.
Reply With Quote
  #535  
Old 08-03-2020, 11:42 PM
Majesty
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,307
I certainly think that the death of Queen Elizabeth may well be a game changer, especially in the realms but also in the UK in how people perceive the BRF and monarchy. She is after all the only monarch most people under 70 in Britain and the Commonwealth have ever known.

I'm not saying that people will be out storming the gates of BP but wouldn't be at all surprised at the level of indifference and apathy to the BRF continuing to rise in both Britain and the Commonwealth in future years.
Reply With Quote
  #536  
Old 08-04-2020, 12:35 AM
Commoner
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Posts: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
Like the 'glamorous' Edward VIII and Bertie the Duke of York? Edward VII and Edward VIII were mired in scandals in their day, while their siblings by and large settled down to fairly humdrum lives, in Britain and abroad. None of George V's surviving siblings were ever caught up in anything untoward, and Prince Charles has himself not been immune to controversy and scandal over the years.

Plus, it's not unknown for a popular and admired monarch to slide into disrepute in later years. Look at the current Spanish situation with Juan Carlos, who was considered a model of probity for decades.

I think Edward VIII and Bertie are the exception rather than the norm. And to be fair, Andrew's scandals make Charles' scandals look insignificant.
Reply With Quote
  #537  
Old 08-04-2020, 01:10 AM
Majesty
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,307
But there's a case for saying that Andrew is himself an exception to the rule. I pointed out some exceptions in my previous post. And what did Princess Margaret, one time spare to the Queen do that was so horrendous?

While she was certainly considered glamorous she wanted to marry a divorcee, and then made the decision to give him up. She had a terrible marriage which certainly wasn't all her fault and when the marriage was a shell was seen holidaying with a young lover. Her estranged husband had several affairs so any clutching of pearls there by onlookers was more than a bit ridiculous.
Reply With Quote
  #538  
Old 08-04-2020, 01:19 AM
Commoner
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Posts: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
But there's a case for saying that Andrew is himself an exception to the rule. I pointed out some exceptions in my previous post. And what did Princess Margaret, one time spare to the Queen do that was so horrendous?

While she was certainly considered glamorous she wanted to marry a divorcee, and then made the decision to give him up. She had a terrible marriage which certainly wasn't all her fault and when the marriage was a shell was seen holidaying with a young lover. Her estranged husband had several affairs so any clutching of pearls there by onlookers was more than a bit ridiculous.

Margaret was incredibly rude and she once said that Irish people are "pigs". Had she lived in the age of social media when she made that comment, she would probably be forced to write an apology.
Reply With Quote
  #539  
Old 08-04-2020, 02:13 AM
Majesty
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,307
She was reputed to have said that. It was reported as that and as she was on a visit to the US the comment gained momentum. I remember it at the time and there was some disagreement over what was supposed to have said.

And if she did say it and it wasn't taken out of context or misheard, that certainly is nothing in comparison to what Prince Philip, consort to Queen Elizabeth, has said about and to various races and people of different ethnicity over many years. Nor is it comparable to the many times King Edward VIII made racist remarks such as comparing Indians to monkeys and calling Jews 'Yids' for example.
Reply With Quote
  #540  
Old 08-04-2020, 02:27 AM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Bordertown, Australia
Posts: 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by sophie25 View Post
I think when the Queen dies the BRF won't last long. In a lot of peoples eyes the Queen IS the British Monarchy and no one coming behind her has a lot of support. I think already that most people in the UK have no great interest in the royals and think of Kings and Queens in the 21st century as a joke but the boat won't be rocked in her lifetime.
People having "no great interest" in the royals is a long way from getting rid of them entirely though. There would need to be a lot of long, hard thought put into that question by a great many people beforehand. For starters, is the alternative much better or to anyone's real benefit? Once it's gone...
__________________

Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Popular Tags
anastasia once upon a time ancestry armstrong-jones belgian royal family belgium chittagong countess of snowdon cover-up crown princess victoria danish royalty dna dubai dutch royal family dutch royals emperor family tree games haakon vii henry v hill history house of bourbon house of glucksburg interesting introduction israel italian royal family jumma kids movie king salman list of rulers mailing mary: crown princess of denmark monaco history monogram nepalese royal jewels nobel prize norwegian royal family prince charles prince dimitri princess chulabhorn walailak princess elizabeth princess ribha pronunciation queen mathilde queen maud rown royal balls royal court royal events royal family royal jewels royal spouse royalty royal wedding saudi arabia serbian royal family shakespeare spain spanish royal spencer family startling new evidence sweden swedish history thailand tracts united states of america unsubscribe videos wedding gown


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:55 PM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2020
Jelsoft Enterprises
×