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  #1  
Old 02-08-2020, 10:09 AM
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"Harry & Charles" (2009) – NRK miniseries on Haakon VII and Queen Maud before Norway

After seeing the showreel months ago, I never, ever thought I would get to see this. Then I happily watched it all in (mostly) Danish.

I really enjoyed it, despite historical inaccuracies and missing the finer details of every argument. Has anyone else seen it? What do you think?




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Old 03-19-2020, 05:55 PM
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Okay, I was requested to write a little about this series.

And I have now watched the first episode. And I really had to pay attention! Because this series requires a more than average knowledge about the events leading up to the union between Norway and Sweden breaking up in 1905 and the reintroduction of the Norwegian monarchy. It's a knowledge I do not have, so I watched this as a novice in this regard.

Instead of writing a summary I think I will list the main characters. But I must emphasize that I do not know what are historical facts in regards to the personal details about the individual characters and what are dramatic license.

We have Prince Carl, aka Charles.
A devoted husband and father. A quiet, intelligent but unassuming man, who is a serving navy officer and loves the navy and the sea.
He was beaten quite a lot as child, which may have led to him shying away from conflicts.

His wife Princess Maud, aka Harry. - Daughter of King Edward of UK.
She is not particularly happy about living in Denmark, or rather the Danish court.
A devoted wife and mother. Most likely suffering from anorexia to some degree. Presumably as a consequence of her unhappiness.

Their oldest son, Alexander. A child of five or so. Who has an English nanny. No surprise there.

King Christian, who at least in this first episode is in Germany.

So it's his son, Crown Prince Frederik, who runs the country. An intelligent, politically astute and serious man. He is the Danish crown prince with a capital D!

His wife is Swedish, and her sympathies, unsurprisingly, lies with Sweden and her brother, King Oscar. She is not at all impressed with Maud and waste no opportunity to put a verbal needle into her daughter-in-law. Something Maud is more than happy to repay! With Carl in the middle, trying to stay neutral.

Then we have Christian, the later Christian X, and his alcoholic wife. The brother of Carl.

We have King Oscar of Sweden. He is most angry and bitter at the Norwegians, whom he consider ungrateful and feel they have betrayed him. He is however trying his very best to subdue the Swedish politicians who advocate a military solution. Which would lead to a war with Norway. A war Norway would most likely lose, but with considerable cost politically and in human lives for Sweden.
As such Swedish and Norwegian troops are quietly taking up positions at the border. (There were of course a number of Norwegian regiments, until recently under Swedish command.)
In Norway there is every desire to end this popular independence by political means only.
The Social Democrats favor a Norwegian republic. There is little public interest in Norway for "glamorous court" nor nobles. However, for reasons that are not clear to me the Liberals and Conservatives prefer a monarchy, believe that would add more political weight to Norway abroad. So soundings as to who should be offered the Norwegian throne are made. Carl of Denmark being the main contender.
But it is important not to antagonize in particular the Swedish King Oscar. So a Norwegian envoy, Baron Wedel Jarlsberg, is send to Sweden do present King Oscar with an offer he cannot accept. I.e. that one of King Oscar's sons should be offered the Norwegian throne. King Oscar, full of resentment towards Norway dismiss the offer angrily, to the relief of the Norwegian politicians.
Then the envoy goes to see King Edward, who doesn't mind at all in seeing his daughter as queen.
The move is politically important. Because Denmark, after the Second Schleswigan War in 1864, was politically and militarily impotent and unable to enforce a Danish prince taking over the Norwegian throne, even if there would be sympathy for the Norwegians, but Britain however has plenty of muscle to keep Sweden in check.
So the envoy travels to Copenhagen and meets first with Crown prince Frederik who immediately see the political can of worms that is placed before him and he tries to stall for time, before wanting to support the proposal of putting his youngest son on the Norwegian throne.
But time is running out, Norway needs a head of state, and soon. Probably before it comes to an armed conflict with Sweden. So at a secret late night meeting Carl is offered the throne. - And there ends the first segment.

However, there is one more character. Tulle. The lady-in-waiting to Maud. They are close friends. Tulle is Carl's first love, and he still loves her, but he also loves his wife. Maud and Tulle are both aware that they love the same man, and that he loves both of them and they are in a agreement to love and support him. - But at the same time they also feel jealous towards each other.

- I hope this biography answered some of the questions.
Otherwise just ask.

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Old 03-19-2020, 06:52 PM
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I just wanted to point out a couple additions:

-It's Marie of Orléans, Uncle Valdemar's wife, who's portrayed as the alcoholic. (You can tell because she speaks a lot of French.) Aside from future-Christian X only being in the entire thing for a couple of minutes, I don't think future-Queen Alexandrine is in it at all.
-Alexander was their only child, not the oldest; he was 2 in July of 1905, but I suspect the actor portraying him is a little bit older for convenience's sake. It's one of the few historical inaccuracies – he's never in a dress!

And now on to what you raised!

Oh my gosh, Carl was BEATEN? By whom?? The navy, or "intelligent, politically astute and serious" Frederik? I know it was the 19th century and I mean, I wondered where that conciliatory nature came from... but if the same thing happened to Christian it clearly had the opposite effect.

And I somehow managed to miss that Sweden almost went to war with Norway over this. Again, I guess that's not terribly surprising, but I guess that's why the "peaceful dissolution" is talked up so much even now. Suddenly, giving the Peace Prizes to Norway makes much more sense!

And I'm actually surprised CP Frederik had so much of a role - for the non-Danish-speaking viewers I would say it seems like Tante Louise gets a far bigger part, but considering F8's small piece of the historical picture, I'm glad he gets something to do.

One thing I do want to know– actually, two. What does Louise say to insult her son at lunch at Amalienborg? "Typical Carl- [something, something, something]."

And I heard that the actress playing Maud speaks deliberately "bad Danish". Is it true?

Thank you very much, Muhler! I hope you're enjoying the dip into obscurer-Danish-tangential history!
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Old 03-19-2020, 09:08 PM
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Oh my gosh, Carl was BEATEN? By whom?? The navy, or "intelligent, politically astute and serious" Frederik? I know it was the 19th century and I mean, I wondered where that conciliatory nature came from... but if the same thing happened to Christian it clearly had the opposite effect.
His mum, Queen Louise, was famously rough on her kids subjecting them to a strict regiment of long outside walks in ALL weather, beatings and a very restricted diet. She was herself bullied by her in-laws who didn't didn't understand the boisterous, informal, emotional and sometimes a bit to frank or downright crude Swedish-Norwegian princess. Her mother-in-law and her sister-in-laws are said to have been jealous of her magnificent jewels and the only one in the family who liked her was Princess Thyra.

Quote:
And I heard that the actress playing Maud speaks deliberately "bad Danish". Is it true?
Maria Bonnevie is a prominent Swedish-Norwegian actress who could probably have played a part in quite decent Danish if she wanted too but have seemingly been told to put on a distinct accent here which strangely enough doesn't sound English at all.
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Old 03-19-2020, 09:25 PM
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His mum, Queen Louise, was famously rough on her kids. She was herself bullied by her in-laws who didn't didn't understand the boisterous, informal, emotional and sometimes a bit to frank Swedish-Norwegian princess. Her mother-in-law and her sister-in-laws are said to have been jealous of her magnificent jewels and the only one in the family who liked her was Princess Thyra.
Wow, and I thought all Tante Louise did to her kids was send them on forced marches-- I mean, "incredibly long walks" every day. (Though, again, whatever she meted out to her kids seems to have had an opposite effect on autocratic, tyrannical Christian.) This puts a whole new context into Maud never liking her aunt (though I think she included the whole family + originally "daft" Carl in there).

Poor Lovisa. It's intensely implied in this that she hates her niece because Maud is as tomboyish and high-spirited as she was (Lovisa was even worse), but Maud both gets away with it and has a loving husband -- I just wasn't able to tell if they make it explicit. (And also, I suppose, that Harry talks back to her like none of her own children would dare.)

That is, poor Lovisa but I'm not forgiving her for doing that to her son. Did he get the worst of it, I wonder?
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Old 03-20-2020, 03:45 AM
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Thanks for putting the characters in place for me.

Well, I have the impression that Carl is a sensitive man. Something he tries to hide, because men weren't supposed to be sensitive back then. But Tulle knows, because he confides to her in the many letters he sends to her - and it is implied he writes much fewer letters to his wife. No wonder since Carl seeming know Tulle and her family since childhood. (Was Tulle's mother his nanny?) So he might see Tulle as a dear cousin.
With whom he freely admits he had a relationship to. He says that to his wife, implying that Tulle is the only one he has had (at least a romantic) relationship with. (But considering the era, probably not a sexual relationship.)
Anyway, back to being sensitive. I think his mother would have noticed that Carl is a sensitive man, and considering her own harsh background, she would very likely have despised that part of her son - while being pretty pleased with Christian being more tough.
So at the dinner table she reproves her son for not keeping his wife in check. (Maud has just retorted another poisonous remark from Louise.) He should speak up - but then he never speaks up. - Implying he is weak. And unable to control his wife as a proper husband should do.

Something similar is also implied by the Norwegian politicians. Without saying so, they see Maud as the brains (and strength) in the marriage. Perhaps they also see Carl as a future king, who can be kept under control?

CP Frederik certainly did have quite a prominent role in at least this episode, with the actor, Kurt Ravn, playing the role with masterly understatement.
It is evident at the dinner table, where he is very close to telling his wife off and clearly disapprove of the manner with which tante Louise treats her daughter-in-law.

I agree with JR76, Maud doesn't sound English at all. English speakers tend to have a very distinct accent when speaking Danish. As a native you simply can't miss it. - It is obvious when you listen to Mary. Alexandra being a rare exception. Presumably something to do with the Danish vowels sounding so differently from English.

I'd say most of the acting is implied.
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Old 03-20-2020, 06:35 AM
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Queen Louise's personality has always been a bit of a mystery to me. She was raised by two adoring parents who doted on their only surviving child and was known in Stockholm as a jovial, informal lady who was very popular with both high society and the general public because of this. Although she didn't fit in at the strict Danish court she was popular with the public for her cheerful demeanor and her extensive charity work. But where did her dark side come from? Many royal children of the time were subjected to strict regiments such as sleeping on camp beds, washing with cold water and a simple diet but Louise seems to have taken it a few steps to far.
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Old 03-20-2020, 06:46 AM
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Queen Louise's personality has always been a bit of a mystery to me. She was raised by two adoring parents who doted on their only surviving child and was known in Stockholm as a jovial, informal lady who was very popular with both high society and the general public because of this. Although she didn't fit in at the strict Danish court she was popular with the public for her cheerful demeanor and her extensive charity work. But where did her dark side come from? Many royal children of the time were subjected to strict regiments such as sleeping on camp beds, washing with cold water and a simple diet but Louise seems to have taken it a few steps to far.
I'd heard it was Frederik's womanizing that had something to do with it. Lovisa was heartbroken (especially since it was something of a marriage of choice, not forced), and clearly his family's rejection of her didn't help, either. She must have felt doubly unlovable, especially compared to her former youth, wealth, and freedom. But I'm certain she knew she was never a "pretty" girl — it just didn't matter when her parents raised her so freely. She eventually embraced religion, found some comfort, and turned into the stuffy old woman we see.

The children just got the dark side in the meantime.

(Again, I think Maud may have disliked her for several reasons but Tante Louise pretty obviously hates her for being free and loved. Being in the same tiny mold as the unwelcoming Queen Louise and her daughters (and being Alix's daughter) was obviously no help, either.)
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Old 03-20-2020, 07:33 AM
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Okay, I've watched the second segment. Easier to follow this time, because I know who the characters are and the pace is slow, giving me time to digest all the subtleties.

The bomb has been dropped at the home of the British charges de affairs in Copenhagen, who is a close personal friend of Maud and Carl.
Carl, while not being dismissive has quite a few personal reservations.
He is a private man, who enjoy having a private life and being able to walk around unnoticed. He is not at all into the pomp and circumstances of a royal court and it is more than implied that he finds the concept of a monarchy less progressive than a republic.
He needs time to consider.

In the mean time Tulle and Maud sits at home waiting for Carl to return. Teasing each other as the close friends they are, but always with the underlying tension of also being rivals for the love and attention from the same man.

Upon returning home Carl confides in his wife. She is game at once! It's a chance to get away from Copenhagen. It's an opportunity to be someone, to be something for an entire nation, to have a purpose in life. - I guess she, as the intelligent woman she obviously is, often must have been bored out of her socks.

The days go by, no decision.

But the republicans are not wasting their time either!
The head of the Social Democrats, Eriksen, approach the Norwegian national hero, Nansen. Polar explorer and known republican. To offer him the opportunity to become president.
Nansen had a... loud... marriage. Read his biography to learn why.

Then we switch to Tulle and Maud, who talk about their youth. Tulle and her family knew Carl very well. He often came to their home in Nyboder. A neighborhood in Copenhagen with houses for navy officers, senior NCO's and specialist seamen. Here Carl sang, something that puzzle Maud. Carl never sings now.
Maud in return talk about a quite happy childhood and youth where they had children's birthday parties, even in their teens. While dad, Edward, was away to a brothel in Paris. It's here she refers to a f*cking chair - she knew perfectly well what daddy was doing. (She'd have had to live in a cave in Tibet not to know though!)

Maud is photographed by her son's nanny at the stables at Christiansborg, where she is informed that Louise wish to talk to her. And she is getting a dressing down by tante Louise! She should be there for her husband, because he is weak, and not running away to England all the time. Her first obligation is to the Danish court, get it! She is basically ordered to pull herself together.
Maud runs away sobbing. You can tell the triumph in Louise's face. Got her!
- But I wonder if there wasn't a deeper purpose of the scolding. To provide Maud with even more incentive to influence her husband to say yes. More on that later.

Nansen is approached by the Norwegian PM, to help persuade Carl to accept the throne. Nansen is a national hero. He is Norway personified and widely admired. He is also a man who can charm women...
And this time the approach is also very much aimed at Maud.

As Nansen later makes it clear. He may be a republican, but he holds Norway's interests higher. Norway as a republic and without allies would be unable to prevent the hawks in Stockholm from getting their way, and that means war. But Norway as a monarchy, with Carl, who has family ties with the SRF and through Maud has the implicit support of the British Empire...

In the meantime back in Copenhagen Tulle and Maud continue their conversations. Maud talks about Francis Teck with whom she was in love. Unfortunately Teck was a shady character who got himself exiled to India where he had the decency to die.
And Maud conclude that had Tulle been a princess she would now be Carl's wife.

Carl and Maud and Tulle are invited to dinner with the British charges de affairs, where Nansen is also present. And he does indeed direct his attention towards Maud, something that makes Carl jealous. But Maud finds him interesting and fascinating and admirable rather than charming.
Nansen is also a conservative man in regards to women. Women, although having many admirable qualities, are after all the weaker sex. Carl is not entirely in agreement, pointing out that women have courage and determination equal to men - his wife certainly has. Maud get that one right away, not being sure whether she is being praised or getting a slap on the wrist for having too high ambitions.
Nansen doesn't get an answer from Carl.

Carl sounds out Tulle as to whether he should accept the Norwegian throne, but she won't decide for him.

During an outing to Dyrehaven outside Copenhagen, Carl talks with his father CP Frederik as to whether he should accept or not. Frederik, already knowing the responsibility first hand, understands his son. Frederik urges caution and patience and advise Carl to stall for time. After all the Swedish King still has to formally okay the secession of Norway and until then Carl can't really be a contender. But he advise his son not to say yes, until he is sure he has the Norwegian people behind him!
Tante Louise is eager to know whether Carl has made up his mind and why does he even hesitate! He should accept right now! - "Norway is lost to my uncle, but not us." She is a cynic!


Back in Norway the head of the Social Democrats, Eriksen, learns of some gossip about Carl, that he is gay. And that a navy cadet killed himself due to an unhappy relation with Carl. Something Eriksen brings up in Stortinget, the Norwegian Parliament. The PM kills that one right away, with a report from the Danish authorities establishing that Carl was in no way involved in the suicide of the cadet.
But the politicians agree that whether Norway should be a monarchy or a republic is for the people to decide.

- And with that we end the second episode. - Heja Norge.
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Old 03-20-2020, 11:44 AM
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Actually, I have another Lovisa question. So the Danes (or the Court) thought she was too informal and free (to the point where her offended mother-in-law banished her from the royal presence).... Yet when Ingrid came to Denmark, she had to loosen up and become "less Swedish". Did something flip around in sixty years, or was Lovisa just an odd case?
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Old 03-20-2020, 12:06 PM
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Well when I saw the headline I thought it was a special on Prince Harry's relationship with his father - but this looks even better. I love history and will have to check this out.
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Old 03-20-2020, 12:12 PM
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Well when I saw the headline I thought it was a special on Prince Harry's relationship with his father - but this looks even better. I love history and will have to check this out.
It is wonderful but unfortunately has no English subtitles, and even knowing the historical events only gets you so far without Danish or Norwegian. Muhler and others are very kindly trying to rectify this.

I still encourage everyone to watch it, though!
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Old 03-20-2020, 12:20 PM
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Well when I saw the headline I thought it was a special on Prince Harry's relationship with his father - but this looks even better. I love history and will have to check this out.
You were not the only one
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Old 03-20-2020, 12:31 PM
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Well when I saw the headline I thought it was a special on Prince Harry's relationship with his father - but this looks even better. I love history and will have to check this out.
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You were not the only one
While I'm pretty sure they came up with that series title deliberately and for that purpose, they were, in fact, the original Harry and Charles. At least, to the BRF. Maud calling him Charles was one sore point among many to her mother-in-law.

There is a very sweet Instagram somewhere where current-Charles has a pair of "C" cufflinks that were a christening gift from his godfather King Haakon/"Uncle Charles". They were his old pair.

Best regifting ever.

Update: Here it is.
https://twitter.com/TV2KjellArne/sta...864967168?s=20
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Old 03-20-2020, 12:39 PM
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Actually, I have another Lovisa question. So the Danes (or the Court) thought she was too informal and free (to the point where her offended mother-in-law banished her from the royal presence).... Yet when Ingrid came to Denmark, she had to loosen up and become "less Swedish". Did something flip around in sixty years, or was Lovisa just an odd case?
Yes a lot happened between 1905 and 1935!
DK changed a lot and so did the public view of the royals and their role.
First are foremost there was the change in the Constitution of 1915, giving almost everyone the right to vote, including women. Which meant that a much larger percentage of the population became politically active and politically aware, taking an interest in who ran and represented the country and how.
DK also became Social Democrat, which meant that the DRF also had to conform to some degree to a much more egalitarian society.
I don't know if WWI changed that much, but the many monarchies. some of them old and mighty, going down surely had an impact as well.
There was the Easter Crisis in 1920 where DK was very close to becoming a republic, that was a big shock for the DRF as well - and they changed their role from political to representative after that scare.
Then there was the Russian Revolution. Getting rid of a whole class that had totally distanced themselves from the people. That had a wide appeal worldwide also in DK.

On top of that watching films, and newsreels became so affordable that most could go to the cinema. The royals were no longer some distant demi-gods you could see pictures of, hanging on the wall at local magistrates offices or at the railway station. Now you saw them on film. And magazines, picture-magazines that also showed the royals, and showed a lot of interest in the royals and what they were doing and wearing, also become so affordable that ordinary people could follow them.

It was a tremendous difference and I think you can well compare the difference in the Danish society to the difference between anno 1938 and anno 1968.

There has always been some animosity towards Swedes here in DK. After all you don't shrug off 600 years with a war on average for every generation, some times more, just like that!
It's not that Swedes were booed in the streets, after all many thousands of Swedes ended up in DK, on their way to America. (Including both sides of my family.) But Sweden was our arch-enemy. Akin to the way some English still view the French.
So yes, in a time with a lot more public focus on the DRF Ingrid coming from Sweden had to conform and adapt, much more so than Louise. Because Louise married into a dynasty. Ingrid married into a country.
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Old 03-20-2020, 04:22 PM
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I have now seen the last episode of the series.

With deep sadness King Oscar of Sweden signs the dissolution of the Union between Norway and Sweden. Norway is now an independent country.

Nansen is once again sent to Copenhagen to persuade Carl to accept the throne. - He has a good rapport with Maude, so that's the approach...

Maud confides in Tulle how it has been for her. She believed that if she and Carl were together, she could face the ordeals. (Presumably referring to the court.) But then he began to sail and was away for months. She felt lonely, longing for Carl. Is there a room for Tulle in the future?
Tulle runs away sobbing. Carl follow her and he believe there is room for her - always.

Nansen meet Carol and Maud, again at the home of the British charges d'affaires, Leech. Turning on his charm.
And now he gets a clear reply from Carl. He accepts on condition that the Norwegians want him at referendum. Until then he will not even go there. Not even take part in the discussions. He intends to be above party politics. The Norwegians hesitantly agrees. Constitutionally speaking Norway is a monarchy, the throne is merely vacant. But Carl insists on a referendum.
Nansen, as a republican at heart, is impressed. (*)

Carl gets drunk - for once. (So would I!) And at some point he spill liqueur on the carpet and remember: When you spill on the carpet, you get the cane!
He drops, helped by his two women, who agree they each couldn't handle him alone.

The final outing on the boat, albeit on land. It's decided Carl will take the name Haakon. Their son will take the name Olav and Maud will remain Maud. The Norwegians had suggested, Harald, but Carl declined, Harald is a Danish name (he claims) and he doesn't want to bring anything with him from Denmark.

The referendum takes place in Norway and with overwhelming majority the Norwegians vote an favor of being a monarchy with Carl as their king. The head of the Social Democrats congratulate his opponents.
Carl is informed by telegram.
Later the Norwegian PM phones Amalienborg to inform the new king that a fully united parliament has formally voted in favor of having Carl as their new king. (Politically that's the best thing to do, in such a situation.) And Carl issues he first public statement to the Norwegian people as their king.

Tante Louise is very pleased and proud of her son. But when looking out the window, she is less than pleased with seeing Carl and Maud on bicycles! Her husband CP Frederik says that: "Carl is king now, he can do as he pleases. I intend to do that as well, when I become king..."

At home Maud is getting into her new role as queen. When paupers at the gate are chased away, she shows kindness.
Their Danish staff are pretty much all dismissed. - Including the English nanny. She is replaced by a Norwegian nanny.

Their good friends, Leech, who expected to go to Norway with Carl and Maude have been told no by the ambassador.
It is publicly known that they are close friends, going to Norway as well would not be sound politically. They shall remain close friends but not around the corner anymore.

After making love, Maud wakens to find Carl in the kitchen with Tulle, talking about old days - unsurprisingly she is jealous. She don't want Tulle around! But Carl says otherwise, Tulle is going with them to Norway, period.

Time to move, time for the last farewell at Amalienborg. Carl is there to select portraits of his family members. He selects a painting of Marie, to the surprise of his mother. Marie has always been kind to him. - You don't think everyone has been kind to you? - No. People at this court have been damned formal and unpleasant. I never liked being here. And they intend to introduce different traditions in Christiania. (The royal seat in what is now a part of Oslo.)
Carl is fondly saying goodbye to his father.
Maud... won't she come to say goodbye? - Mother, QUEEN Maud can be found in her home.
Have you selected a proverb? - Yes, All for Norway.

Back home, Tulle has left a note: Farewell.
Carl seeks her, telling her she must go to Norway with them and that they all know Maud can't do without her. They sail tomorrow at 11. so it's up to Tulle.
Carl also seeks up his wife, and brings her home.

On the way, by ship to Norway, Carl prepares his first speech, in somewhat less than adequate Norwegian. (He never really learns to master Norwegian.)
They go up on deck, with Alexander who hasn't gotten used to his new name, Olav. There they look at Christiania coming out of the fog, while we hear the PM I presume, giving a speech.

- That's it.

It is IMO very much a series directed at women. Being chromozone-challenged I must confess that the dynamics between Maud and Tulle mostly goes above my head.
It's a series that is intellectually stimulating. You can't nod off or you'll miss some little detail. It's not something that will leave you more stupid, when you have finished viewing. Personally I would have preferred a documentary, because I don't know enough to decide what is plausible and what is dramatic license.
It does answer a few things. Like why the Norwegian court is so much less formal in comparison to the Swedish and Danish. And why the Norwegians view their royals in such a fiercely egalitarian light that tends to baffle a Dane and even a Swede.
It also lends credit to in impression I have, that Norway is really a republican monarchy.

(*) It has been suggested that the best head of state is someone who has to be carried kicking and screaming into the office, but who once there will do his very best.
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Old 03-20-2020, 05:56 PM
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This series sounds so very interesting. I hope they will become available with English subtitles.

Question: why is Maud called Harry?
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Old 03-20-2020, 06:09 PM
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This series sounds so very interesting. I hope they will become available with English subtitles.

Question: why is Maud called Harry?
Unfortunately, it's more than a decade old and NRK clearly didn't see any worth in a wider release, so I'm not sure I'd hold my breath...

I keep saying there are no subtitles, but the showreel does have some, and gives you a little bit of what was going on.

Her father had an admiral friend, Harry Keppel (a very distant relative of Camilla) – who was similarly short and boisterous.

Actually to me, the question is, I haven't a clue why she was called Maud – she wasn't named after anybody obvious.

At least it's not as bad as Carl... whose real first name is really also Christian. Sigh. No wonder he was content to let anybody call him whatever!

She really was Harry to her close friends and family! https://www.rct.uk/collection/search...nt-prince-olav
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  #19  
Old 03-20-2020, 06:42 PM
Muhler's Avatar
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Eastern Jutland, Denmark
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You can find the series in Blu-ray but only with Norwegian subtitles.

The series has been strongly criticized for being way too much fiction. According to a professional biographer, there is no reason to suggest Tulle and Carl had a romantic relationship.
The only time he mention "forelskelse" = falling in love, in his letters to Tulle, was in connection with Maud.
The producers behind the series does not claim it to be historically correct at all.
The series did however receive a lot of acclaim for being very good drama and very good acting.

https://www.aftenposten.no/kultur/i/...rry-og-charles

https://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Harry...Blu-ray/68978/
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  #20  
Old 03-20-2020, 06:58 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: The 6ix, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
You can find the series in Blu-ray but only with Norwegian subtitles.

The series has been strongly criticized for being way too much fiction. According to a professional biographer, there is no reason to suggest Tulle and Carl had a romantic relationship.
The only time he mention "forelskelse" = falling in love, in his letters to Tulle, was in connection with Maud.
The producers behind the series does not claim it to be historically correct at all.
The series did however receive a lot of acclaim for being very good drama and very good acting.

https://www.aftenposten.no/kultur/i/...rry-og-charles

https://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Harry...Blu-ray/68978/
Yes, the premise that Tulle and Charles were that close in 1905 is fiction, and I don't think she went with them to Norway. Also, I don't think Maud was so eager to be a queen (they do call her "Her Royal Shyness"), after all, no matter how much she hated Denmark or Denmark without Carl. It was very much a leap in the dark for both of them.

Other than that, I feel like they stuck pretty closely to the facts. I even learned a few just by asking someone who speaks Danish! (Poor, poor Carl... )

Tulle's part may be largely fiction, but without her, you still have to have some kind of drama between Harry and Charles. It will be interesting to see what the upcoming series about Haakon's life does. (Oh, wait, I know the drama they're going to pull, and it's also been criticized as not particularly accurate. )
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