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  #21  
Old 03-20-2020, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Prinsara View Post
Y, I don't think Maud was so eager to be a queen (they do call her "Her Royal Shyness"), after all, no matter how much she hated Denmark or Denmark without Carl. It was very much a leap in the dark for both of them.

Other tha accurate. )
I didn't think she liked Scandinavia that much... it was cold and she spent a lot of time in the UK..
re the Harry nickname, I though that her godfather was a Harry and Q Alexandra called her by the same name...
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  #22  
Old 03-20-2020, 07:35 PM
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The most fascinating character was IMO CP Louise (Lovisa, being her Swedish name.)
https://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louise_af_Sverige-Norge

She was indeed very popular for her charity in the population - and for not being German. It was common for Danish royals to marry German princesses, but the two Schleswigan Wars made that practice considerably less palatable among the Danes! So a Swedish princess came in handy. Not least because Denmark turned towards the rest of Scandinavia after the two traumatic wars.
It's interesting for me to learn that Louise was leaning towards Indre Mission.

Indre Mission is, very simplified, a kind of Lutheran Puritans, and just as stern!
It had a lot of appeal in Jutland (still has considerable appeal in some places there) especially among the poor coastal fisher-families along the dangerous west coast of Jutland.
The Indre Mission came in waves, the first in the mid 1800's, the second a little later and a powerful upsurge in the early 1920's, with the Bartholdi movement.
- My great-grandmother belonged to Indre Mission - and she often said how she looked forward to dying, as she was sure to go to Heaven. She was therefore sad on behalf of her husband and son who did not belong to the movement. They were damned.
An example: Fishermen also doubled as rescuers in storms, and it was during such a storm around 1920 that a rescue boat was in trouble. One of the fishermen handed his lifejacket to another fisherman who did not belong to Indre Mission. He knew that if he drowned, he would go straight to Heaven, but the other fisherman, not belonging to Indre Mission, would not. But if he survived with this donated life jacket, he would perhaps later join Indre Mission and therefore find Salvation and go to Heaven.
- It is in that context we should perhaps view Louise's mindset around 1905.
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  #23  
Old 03-20-2020, 09:20 PM
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SLV SLV is offline
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Originally Posted by Prinsara View Post
Unfortunately, it's more than a decade old and NRK clearly didn't see any worth in a wider release, so I'm not sure I'd hold my breath...

I keep saying there are no subtitles, but the showreel does have some, and gives you a little bit of what was going on.

Her father had an admiral friend, Harry Keppel (a very distant relative of Camilla) – who was similarly short and boisterous.

Actually to me, the question is, I haven't a clue why she was called Maud – she wasn't named after anybody obvious.

At least it's not as bad as Carl... whose real first name is really also Christian. Sigh. No wonder he was content to let anybody call him whatever!

She really was Harry to her close friends and family! https://www.rct.uk/collection/search...nt-prince-olav
Thanks,
I had not realised the series was that old.
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  #24  
Old 03-20-2020, 10:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Muhler View Post

Carl gets drunk - for once. (So would I!)
"Miss Carstensen, my old flame!"
"You're beautiful. And you're beautiful."

Really drunk!Carl is one of the best things in the series. Much funnier than really drunk Maud, because he's so much more normally sober in demeanor. Drinking, smoking, and tossing records on the ground. And here I thought it was all just to highlight the menage à trois...

Quote:
And at some point he spill liqueur on the carpet and remember: When you spill on the carpet, you get caned!
Here is your female reaction, Muhler: "My poor baby! LET ME GIVE YOU A HUG!"

I can't forgive Lovisa for doing that to her child(ren). I just can't, and it's to Carl/Charles/Haakon's immense credit that he was as kind as he was to his own wife and son.

I also want to mention the very sweet scene where he sits with Alexander to get him to sleep. Even if it's just foreshadowing their very long close connection, it's lovely.


Quote:

The final outing on the boat, albeit in land. It's decided Carl will take the name Haakon. Their son will take the name Olav and Maud will remain Maud. The Norwegians had suggested, Harald, but Carl declined, Harald is a Danish name (he claims) and he doesn't want to bring anything with him from Denmark.
This is of course a hilarious call-forward, see the current king of Norway. But Maud apparently really did not like the name and threatened to tell the bishop at the christening his name was Magnus. Haakon was worried she really would do it. (And so we get Haakon Magnus and Sverre Magnus...)

Quote:
The referendum takes place in Norway and with overwhelming majority the Norwegians vote an favor of being a monarchy with Carl as their king. The head of the Social Democrats congratulate his opponents.
Carl is informed by telegram.
His wife kisses the living daylights out of him.

Quote:
After making love, Maud wakens to find Carl in the kitchen with Tulle, talking old days - unsurprisingly she is jealous. She don't want Tulle around! But Carl says otherwise, Tulle is going with them to Norway, period.
Okay, logically, there's nothing wrong with sitting with a friend when you both can't sleep. Emotionally -- you idiot. (And I thought this before I understood a word.) You deserve to have to go chase both of them, and maybe that's what you really want. (He certainly chased Maud enough in real life before she agreed to marry him.)

Quote:
Time to move, time for the last farewell at Amalienborg. Carl is there to select portraits of his family members. He selects of painting of Marie, to the surprise of his mother. Marie has always been kind to him. - You don't think everyone has been kind to you? - No. People at this court have been damned formal and unpleasant. I never liked being here. And they intend to introduce different traditions in Christiania. (The royal seat in what is now a part of Oslo.)
I wonder if there really is a portrait of Marie of Orléans somewhere in Oslo? Probably.

Quote:
Maud... won't she come to say goodbye? - Mother, QUEEN Maud can be found in her home.
"Harry isn't coming to say goodbye?". "Queen Maud".

Quote:
Have you selected a proverb? - Yes, All for Norway.
Ehhh. It'll never catch on.

Quote:
Carl also seeks up his wife, and brings her home.
Carl running after first one woman, than another, is great, and the fact that he gets Maud to come home by just saying "Darling?" and gives her a lift back on his bike... It's too cute. She can't have been that mad.

Quote:
On the way, by ship to Norway, Carl prepares his first speech, in somewhat less than adequate Norwegian. (He never really learns to master Norwegian.)
They go up on deck, with Alexander who hasn't gotten used to his new name, Olav. There they look at Christiania coming out of the fog, while we hear the PM I presume, giving a speech.


- That's it.
Maud laughing at her husband attempting Norwegian is amazing. You can see why Olav described her decades later as "a fantastic and joyful human being".

If you look carefully, you notice he cuts himself shaving in nearly the same place Maud had a nosebleed at the beginning.

Quote:
It does answer a few things. Like why the Norwegian court is so much less formal in comparison to the Swedish and Danish. And why the Norwegians view their royals in such a fiercely egalitarian light that tends to baffle a Dane and even a Swede.
It also lends credit to in impression I have, that Norway is really a republican monarchy.
See, I didn't even know Norway's monarchy was so "republican", but now I do.

For anyone who wants to watch older Carl making another decision/what is basically the sequel to this (and was clearly not done with women in mind, though that doesn't detract from it at all ) Kongens Nei/"The King's Choice" is a wonderful film, with subtitles(!!!) -- which led me to wanting to see this!

Quote:
(*) It has been suggested that the best head of state is someone who has to be carried kicking and screaming into the office, but who once there will do his very best.
And they are probably very hard to find for a reason, so we appreciate one when we see him, and the women who help make him that way. Not you, Lovisa.
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  #25  
Old 03-21-2020, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Prinsara View Post
Actually, I have another Lovisa question. So the Danes (or the Court) thought she was too informal and free (to the point where her offended mother-in-law banished her from the royal presence).... Yet when Ingrid came to Denmark, she had to loosen up and become "less Swedish". Did something flip around in sixty years, or was Lovisa just an odd case?
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Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
I don't know if WWI changed that much, but the many monarchies. some of them old and mighty, going down surely had an impact as well.

So yes, in a time with a lot more public focus on the DRF Ingrid coming from Sweden had to conform and adapt, much more so than Louise. Because Louise married into a dynasty. Ingrid married into a country.
The Swedish court under Louise's father King Carl XIV of Sweden and Norway (Louise was overjoyed at the fact that her son would sit on her father's throne) was a vivacious, wild and quite indecent one with the Royal calendar filled with balls, dinners, parties, picknicks etc... The King's love of women was well known and the stories of how many illegitimate children he fathered is as widespread as they're probably mostly false. In contrast to this the Danish court was smaller, more conscious of what was deemed proper behaviour for a royal, more biedemeier,(as in proper & middle-class) and both the King and Queen (who, as we all know, was the real head of the household) were serious, hard-working people who really had to prove themselves worthy of the position that they had been elevated too.
One of the occasions when Crown Princess Louise was banished by her mother-in-law was caused by the following exchange of words:
"- Don't you know who you are?! - I do know. I'm a King's daughter" implying her superiority to her mil who was born the daughter of a German Prince.
Politically Sweden, Denmark and their royal families went through similar challenges during the late 1800s and early 1900s but the two countries adapted to them a bit differently. Sweden favoured big industries while Denmark favoured smaller enterprises which in the end led to a big more conformist Swedish working and lower middle classes while the Danes took a more individual approach to life - let the neighbour watch and screw him if he doesn't like what he see.
As we all know the numerous offspring of Louise and Christian transformed that previously rather stiff court into a very wild and fun one while the Swedish court under Oscar II & Gustav V and their German queens (one liberal and nonconformist religious the other arch-conservative and high church) was a serious one obsessed with status, etiquette and maintaining decorum. One can say that they made a switch that came to match how the two nation's image of each other.
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  #26  
Old 03-21-2020, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by JR76 View Post
One of the occasions when Crown Princess Louise was banished by her mother-in-law was caused by the following exchange of words:
"- Don't you know who you are?! - I do know. I'm a King's daughter" implying her superiority to her mil who was born the daughter of a German Prince.
Politically Sweden, Denmark and their royal families went through similar challenges during the late 1800s and early 1900s but the two countries adapted to them a bit differently. Sweden favoured big industries while Denmark favoured smaller enterprises which in the end led to a big more conformist Swedish working and lower middle classes while the Danes took a more individual approach to life - let the neighbour watch and screw him if he doesn't like what he see.
As we all know the numerous offspring of Louise and Christian transformed that previously rather stiff court into a very wild and fun one while the Swedish court under Oscar II & Gustav V and their German queens (one liberal and nonconformist religious the other arch-conservative and high church) was a serious one obsessed with status, etiquette and maintaining decorum. One can say that they made a switch that came to match how the two nation's image of each other.
Does that mean saying "take it easy, Petersen!" isn't really why Queen Louise threw her out? Because that's such a good story. I wanted that one to be true.

And Lovisa herself went from being exuberant and free to being a puritanical, stuffy old woman. She's a cautionary tale, for sure. And the part of me that is furious at her is still outweighing the part that feels very sorry for her.
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  #27  
Old 03-21-2020, 01:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Prinsara View Post
Does that mean saying "take it easy, Petersen!" isn't really why Queen Louise threw her out? Because that's such a good story. I wanted that one to be true.

And Lovisa herself went from being exuberant and free to being a puritanical, stuffy old woman. She's a cautionary tale, for sure. And the part of me that is furious at her is still outweighing the part that feels very sorry for her.
I thought about that too. Either both are true, one is true or none is true... Maybe the two Louises had more than one fallout caused by the catty tongue of Louise Jr.
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  #28  
Old 03-21-2020, 02:15 PM
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I thought about that too. Either both are true, one is true or none is true... Maybe the two Louises had more than one fallout caused by the catty tongue of Louise Jr.
Frederik clearly never heard or listened to that thing about not marrying a spouse who has the same name as your parent!

For such a troubled mésalliance, their children and grandchildren managed some remarkable things. Where do I go vent in her thread to not let Tante Louise run this one? Is she under Sweden (not Norway, ha!) or Denmark?

Edit: I just realized that narratively, at least, Maud's not afraid of her aunt and Tante Louise can only bully her so far because she is also the daughter of a king (and a living, reigning king, at that). That's brilliant.
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  #29  
Old 03-24-2020, 09:40 PM
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So, I made a Tv Tropes page for the series... a while ago, actually, but now I got to update it with a couple of things. :) It's another way to summarize the series until we get those subtitles. Enjoy, and please feel free to add on if you know how tvt works!

https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.p...arryAndCharles
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