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  #21  
Old 09-26-2021, 10:06 PM
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To me, and this is only my opinion, the name Maud, in spite of its part-Germanic origins, has a sort of Nordic ring to it anyway, reminiscent of Vikings and ancient halls of legend. Even though it wasn’t originally a Norwegian name apparently it’s still quite popular in Norway.
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  #22  
Old 09-27-2021, 01:28 AM
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Which I'm fairly sure is due to their first modern Queen. There doesn't seem to be much of an explanation otherwise.
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  #23  
Old 09-28-2021, 05:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Prinsara View Post
Yes, probably; what nation regaining their independence from medieval times wouldn't be flattered? But it's not like it was an ingenious or uncommon thing to do — he would have just had to have looked at his Uncle Wilhelm, George I of Greece for the past several decades.

Do you think Maud made them unhappy by not changing her name?
No, I do not believe that the Norwegian people were unhappy that Maud did not change her name.
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  #24  
Old 09-28-2021, 05:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Prinsara View Post
Yes, probably; what nation regaining their independence from medieval times wouldn't be flattered? But it's not like it was an ingenious or uncommon thing to do — he would have just had to have looked at his Uncle Wilhelm, George I of Greece for the past several decades.

Do you think Maud made them unhappy by not changing her name?
I have read the 8 part biographical book series about Haakon VII and Maud by Tor Bomann-Larsen, and as far as i remember there was never any suggestion that anybody unhappy that Maud did not change her name.

The 8 books where written between 2002 and 2019. They are probably the best books written about Haakon and Maud, as far as i know they are only available in Norwegian.

I know the question was not for me, but i answered it anyway.
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  #25  
Old 09-28-2021, 05:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
To me, and this is only my opinion, the name Maud, in spite of its part-Germanic origins, has a sort of Nordic ring to it anyway, reminiscent of Vikings and ancient halls of legend. Even though it wasn’t originally a Norwegian name apparently it’s still quite popular in Norway.
Its an old Germanic name
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  #26  
Old 09-28-2021, 10:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Feologild View Post
I have read the 8 part biographical book series about Haakon VII and Maud by Tor Bomann-Larsen, and as far as i remember there was never any suggestion that anybody unhappy that Maud did not change her name.

The 8 books where written between 2002 and 2019. They are probably the best books written about Haakon and Maud, as far as i know they are only available in Norwegian.

I know the question was not for me, but i answered it anyway.
It's a discussion board, so the questions are pretty much for anyone.

How can they be the best books about Haakon and Maud when they're most (in)famous for Bormann-Larsen making new accusations about their son's paternity and legitimacy? When other historians have generally pointed out his theory has huge holes in it?
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  #27  
Old 09-28-2021, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Feologild View Post
I have read the 8 part biographical book series about Haakon VII and Maud by Tor Bomann-Larsen, and as far as i remember there was never any suggestion that anybody unhappy that Maud did not change her name.

The 8 books where written between 2002 and 2019. They are probably the best books written about Haakon and Maud, as far as i know they are only available in Norwegian.

I know the question was not for me, but i answered it anyway.
Thank you very much. I hope you will continue to contribute. There is an unfortunate scarcity of Norwegian posters at the moment.



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Originally Posted by Prinsara View Post
How can they be the best books about Haakon and Maud when they're most (in)famous for Bormann-Larsen making new accusations about their son's paternity and legitimacy? When other historians have generally pointed out his theory has huge holes in it?
Did Mr. Bormann-Larsen question King Olav's legitimacy? I was under the impression that his theory was limited to Olav's biological paternity.

I am not familiar with the critiques of his theories. Could you give a short summary?
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  #28  
Old 09-28-2021, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post

Did Mr. Bormann-Larsen question King Olav's legitimacy? I was under the impression that his theory was limited to Olav's biological paternity.

I am not familiar with the critiques of his theories. Could you give a short summary?
Here: https://www.vg.no/rampelys/bok/i/zWw...raverende-feil, and here: https://www.vg.no/rampelys/bok/i/0ez...er-tilbakevist (Google translate). From here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk%3AOlav_V_of_Norway

Everyone also seems to point out Bormann-Larsen is an author, not a historian.

If Olav were not the biological child of Haakon I imagine that would have rather serious consequences for the NRF and his legitimacy as a rightful heir, since I don't know when non-biological children have been in lines of succession in the modern era.
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  #29  
Old 09-28-2021, 10:18 PM
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I don't know would it be controversial at that time, but I guess for the current Norwegians could be care less about that, Olav proved that he's the good king for Norway, so does his heir Harald. I remember that I've seen a Norwegian commented that with something like, who cares he's the rightful king or not (biologically) if he had done it right.
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  #30  
Old 09-28-2021, 10:24 PM
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So if anybody can do a good job as king, why have a hereditary monarchy at all and what right do the current Glucksborgs have to be there on the taxpayer dime? And why is Ingrid the heir and not Marius?
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  #31  
Old 09-28-2021, 10:53 PM
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Not that I am suggesting bloodline isn't important at all in hereditary monarchy, Prinsara. I'm just saying that maybe different generations/people from that period and people from 2021 view Olav's legitimacy differently, not because the mindsets are different, but mainly because the information they had is different. (I just woke up and I hope my brain is working)
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  #32  
Old 09-29-2021, 05:51 AM
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Prime minister Bondevik commented at the time that the parentage of King Olav was constitutionally irrelevant today. He was the result of a legal marriage, born to two loving parents (if anything he was closer to Haakon than he was to Maud) and he was part of the package that got elected by the Norwegian people.
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  #33  
Old 09-29-2021, 12:15 PM
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Which is all well and good, but Marius is not even part of the Royal Family, and Olav's nephew King Baudouin in Belgium would have given just about anything to have a non-biological child as his heir, and that was never allowed. I'm not saying they'd throw the current NRF out, but if anything, they've gotten quite a bit stricter with the decades.

The rumors about Olav are more than 100 years old and have encompassed both of his parents, and it's only with the Bormann-Larsen variation that other people seem to have dug up the evidence in all likelihood he is their kid.

Without the mustache it is a lot easier to see a resemblance (look at his eyes). https://www.rct.uk/sites/default/fil...1547730257.jpg
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  #34  
Old 09-30-2021, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by JR76 View Post
Prime minister Bondevik commented at the time that the parentage of King Olav was constitutionally irrelevant today. He was the result of a legal marriage, born to two loving parents (if anything he was closer to Haakon than he was to Maud) and he was part of the package that got elected by the Norwegian people.
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Originally Posted by Prinsara View Post
Which is all well and good, but Marius is not even part of the Royal Family, and Olav's nephew King Baudouin in Belgium would have given just about anything to have a non-biological child as his heir, and that was never allowed. I'm not saying they'd throw the current NRF out, but if anything, they've gotten quite a bit stricter with the decades.
Marius is part of the Royal Family although not of the Royal House. Neither Marius nor a hypothetical adoptive child of King Baudouin were born of the legal marriage of their royal stepparent/adoptive parent, so their legal positions are not analogous to King Olav V.

The legal concept of legitimacy conventionally hinges on birth within a legally recognized marriage (in some jurisdictions, a subsequent marriage of the child's legally recognized parents or a legal decree may also give rise to legitimacy), but not on biological parentage (for which a biological father had no unimpeachable proof until the advent of DNA testing). That is why presenting the results of a DNA test was only a first step, not the conclusion, of the then Delphine Boël's case to invalidate her legal position as a legitimate daughter of Jacques Boël.
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  #35  
Old 10-28-2021, 12:39 PM
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King Haakon VII in London (1951):

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