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  #121  
Old 05-19-2019, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Denville View Post
It is probably the same book...
I did a little more looking at the books and the first one I referenced is a reissue by a different publishing company. I wonder if it is because of a different publishing company that the name had to be changed.
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  #122  
Old 11-06-2019, 08:24 PM
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In August 1761, King George III met Princess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.
http://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-in-...-87987015.html
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  #123  
Old 01-29-2020, 05:58 AM
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Today is the 200th anniversary [1820] of the death of the much loved King George lll ['Farmer George'] whose reign is most notably associated with the loss of one particularly pesky North American colony.- but which was really largely the fault of his inept PM [Lord North].

In reality his long reign saw the a massive increase in the prosperity of Britain - astounding industrial & agricultural Revolutions, a vast expansion of a prosperous Middle Class. the beginnings of the anti-slavery movement [1783], and wholly victorious wars against the primary {French} Enemy -1792-1815, giving Great Britain absolute dominance of the World for almost exactly a Century.

Aside from this he was a thoroughly decent Man, a good Father and Husband, wholly unpretentious, and as unlike both his predecessor and successor as he could possibly be..
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  #124  
Old 01-29-2020, 02:56 PM
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Today is the 200th anniversary [1820] of the death of the much loved King George lll ['Farmer George'] whose reign is most notably associated with the loss of one particularly pesky North American colony.- but which was really largely the fault of his inept PM [Lord North].

In reality his long reign saw the a massive increase in the prosperity of Britain - astounding industrial & agricultural Revolutions, a vast expansion of a prosperous Middle Class. the beginnings of the anti-slavery movement [1783], and wholly victorious wars against the primary {French} Enemy -1792-1815, giving Great Britain absolute dominance of the World for almost exactly a Century.

Aside from this he was a thoroughly decent Man, a good Father and Husband, wholly unpretentious, and as unlike both his predecessor and successor as he could possibly be..
I wonder what did become of those unfortunate Americans, such a shame for them.......

More seriously I find George an interesting character. I think his is a possible model for a 21st century monarchy. Personal, unfussy & modest.
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  #125  
Old 01-29-2020, 03:03 PM
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THE Death announcement for H.M.King George III in the GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, London, dated February, 1820!!!

Death of King George III with coffin print... - RareNewspapers.com
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  #126  
Old 01-29-2020, 03:18 PM
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Originally Posted by An Ard Ri View Post
THE Death announcement for H.M.King George III in the GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, London, dated February, 1820!!!

Death of King George III with coffin print... - RareNewspapers.com
Very interesting, thank you.

It's certainly a lot more respectful than the comment in The Times printed after the death of his son George iv:

"there never was an individual less regretted by his fellow creatures than this deceased king"

Certainly puts modern day criticism of royalty into some sort of historical context.
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  #127  
Old 01-29-2020, 03:50 PM
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Very interesting, thank you.

It's certainly a lot more respectful than the comment in The Times printed after the death of his son George iv:

"there never was an individual less regretted by his fellow creatures than this deceased king"

Certainly puts modern day criticism of royalty into some sort of historical context.
They really could say these things right after the King´s death without ending up in the Tower...?! On the other hand they had these unflattering satiric sketches during the reigns of Georges III and IV all the time!
I guess these things would have been quite unheard of in later reigns and things one could say about Royalty and what you could say not, until the late 1960s, became much more strict!
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  #128  
Old 01-29-2020, 05:26 PM
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They really could say these things right after the King´s death without ending up in the Tower...?! On the other hand they had these unflattering satiric sketches during the reigns of Georges III and IV all the time!
I guess these things would have been quite unheard of in later reigns and things one could say about Royalty and what you could say not, until the late 1960s, became much more strict!
Yes indeed the James Gillray pictures. Wonderful satire!

There has long been a tradition of lese majeste in English/British tradition. Quite healthily so in my opinion.

The near veneration of the aged Victoria & the continuing deep deference well into the twentieth century towards British monarchs is unusual in a historical context. The first cracks began to appear in the fifties with Lord Altricham's waspish criticisms of the young queen.
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  #129  
Old 02-08-2020, 12:01 PM
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I came across this interesting account of the visit of George & Charlotte to Lulworth castle in 1789. They went inside the newly built Roman Catholic chapel (2.23 in). An interesting historical incident in post Reformation England. This was only nine years after the infamous Gordon riots.

George is said to have been one of those against Roman Catholic emancipation at the 1800 union with Ireland. I wonder if he was privately tolerant but felt he had to be ultra protestant in public.

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  #130  
Old 02-08-2020, 12:40 PM
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I wonder what did become of those unfortunate Americans, such a shame for them.......
We are ruled by a mad tyrant..so we have come full circle...and are indeed unfortunate....
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  #131  
Old 02-08-2020, 12:46 PM
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We are ruled by a mad tyrant..so we have come full circle...and are indeed unfortunate....
That made me giggle thank you
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  #132  
Old 02-08-2020, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Durham View Post
Very interesting, thank you.

It's certainly a lot more respectful than the comment in The Times printed after the death of his son George iv:

"there never was an individual less regretted by his fellow creatures than this deceased king"

Certainly puts modern day criticism of royalty into some sort of historical context.


Wow. He was really unpopular.
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  #133  
Old 02-08-2020, 04:49 PM
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Wow. He was really unpopular.
He was a pretty dreadful individual. George III's sons were no prize but George, the heir was one of the worst.
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  #134  
Old 02-09-2020, 02:15 PM
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We are ruled by a mad tyrant..so we have come full circle...and are indeed unfortunate....
Gawin I blame you for the coffee I just spewed on my laptop
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  #135  
Old 03-01-2020, 04:38 AM
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Originally Posted by wyevale View Post
Today is the 200th anniversary [1820] of the death of the much loved King George lll ['Farmer George'] whose reign is most notably associated with the loss of one particularly pesky North American colony.- but which was really largely the fault of his inept PM [Lord North].

In reality his long reign saw the a massive increase in the prosperity of Britain - astounding industrial & agricultural Revolutions, a vast expansion of a prosperous Middle Class. the beginnings of the anti-slavery movement [1783], and wholly victorious wars against the primary {French} Enemy -1792-1815, giving Great Britain absolute dominance of the World for almost exactly a Century.

Aside from this he was a thoroughly decent Man, a good Father and Husband, wholly unpretentious, and as unlike both his predecessor and successor as he could possibly be..
He is one of my favorites as well. Of course, he had to become crazy.
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  #136  
Old 03-01-2020, 04:39 AM
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We are ruled by a mad tyrant..so we have come full circle...and are indeed unfortunate....
This is not true.
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  #137  
Old 03-01-2020, 07:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Durham View Post
I came across this interesting account of the visit of George & Charlotte to Lulworth castle in 1789. They went inside the newly built Roman Catholic chapel (2.23 in). An interesting historical incident in post Reformation England. This was only nine years after the infamous Gordon riots.

George is said to have been one of those against Roman Catholic emancipation at the 1800 union with Ireland. I wonder if he was privately tolerant but felt he had to be ultra protestant in public.
I wonder how the king King felt about the influx of French Roman Catholics fleeing the French Revolution and religious persecution during the terror.I think surviving members of the Bourbon family stayed at Lulworth castle for a time.
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  #138  
Old 03-01-2020, 07:21 AM
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Aside from this he was a thoroughly decent Man, a good Father and Husband, wholly unpretentious, and as unlike both his predecessor and successor as he could possibly be..

He was a good brother, too, to his sisters after his own father, Frederick Prince of Wales died. Yes, he looked for "good" marriages for the sake of th Uk but when he was in doubt of the character of the future husband, he secured his sister's dowry for her, so she could use it as she wanted. When his youngest sister Caroline Matilde was imprisonned in Danmark and her husband declared mad after their marriage a trois with their prime minister Count Struensee (both men had fathered a child with Caroline Matilde) had been broken up by a revolution at court led by the king's stepnother Dowager queen Juliane, he managed to get his sister free and her dowry back, so she could live in his Hannoveran lands in peace and richness. The Count alas was executed, the king was treated for his mental health and as soon as Caroline Matilde's eldest, the son by the king,

was at 16 considered old enough to become prince regent, all was settled again. Only Caroline Matilde could not come back to Copenhagen, as she had died before. But her daughter with Count Struensee had been legitimized by her husbund, so could marry as a Roiyal Princess of Denmark. All without doubt because George III. never ceased to care for his sister and her family and pushed the Danish government, even threatening with war till they declared his nephew an adult at 16 and handed over the power.
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  #139  
Old 03-16-2020, 02:40 PM
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I wonder how the king King felt about the influx of French Roman Catholics fleeing the French Revolution and religious persecution during the terror.I think surviving members of the Bourbon family stayed at Lulworth castle for a time.
After various adventures Louis XVIII arrived in England in 1808. He lived at Hartwell House in Buckinghamshire, paid for by the king.

I would imagine George found the chaos & irreligion troubling. Catholic Bourbon France was a known entity even if it was the traditional foe. The new revolutionary France proved to be far more dangerous & unpredictable & indeed plunged Europe into over two decades of war & upheaval.
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  #140  
Old 03-16-2020, 03:35 PM
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Do you think that King George III wondered if any of his older children might become interested in the Roman Catholic religion?
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