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  #1541  
Old 09-02-2017, 06:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denville View Post
I don't know of any evidence that she was "left alone", or abused. She had servants who were loyal to her, and took care of her. it is fo course sad that she ended up so ill and unable to have anything like a real life, but that was just bad luck. I'm sure she was well looked after.
Nope she was not, just read the book.
Her closest entourage was fired, her butler stole and published intimate papers and her lawyer imitated her signature and sold or donated items without her consent.
Its clearly not "well looked after".
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  #1542  
Old 09-02-2017, 07:12 AM
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Why would Hitler tell him the truth of his plans when he lied to everyone else about everything? Germany figured "Take England, take the Empire!" 1/4 of the world in one small island. Why do you think they were so determined.
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  #1543  
Old 09-02-2017, 07:16 AM
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Like so many people in the "better class", all over Europe, there was a certain goodwill for Hitler because "at least it are not the socialists or communists". Many German royals and nobles (and Edward was a German Prinz von Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha, Herzog von Sachsen until the cosmetic change in "Windsor") felt goodwill and understanding for Hitler because of being a dam against those "red herds" which toppled the monarchy in 1918 and because he brought law, order and prosperity after the anarchy of the Weimar Republic.

Hitler managed to outmanoeuvre the hefty and hated burden of the Versailles Treaty. Germany showed the world amazing technical progress, the Berlin Olympics of 1936 were an example of excellent organization, etc. Yes the ongoing crimes against the Jewish were worrying but the organized genocide on people would start during WWII, not in the 1930's, so we must not judge Edward and Wallis, and so many of their fellow British contemporaries, about their attitude towards Hitler, which was "let us give him the benefit of the doubt: is there any alternative?" in the interbellum.

Speculation what he would have done as a puppet King is useless. Edward has abdicated and 100% axknowledged his brother as The King and his niece Elizabeth as the Heir. Period.
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  #1544  
Old 09-02-2017, 08:53 AM
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I suspect that had Edward been King after 1936, and married to Wallis he may well have abdicated in the run up to War, and moved [with his wife] to the United States. He loved America FAR more than he loved his country of birth..
One thing is certain tho'... Mrs Simpson did us a BIG favour in facilitating his removal from the throne.
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  #1545  
Old 09-02-2017, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by wyevale View Post
I suspect that had Edward been King after 1936, and married to Wallis he may well have abdicated in the run up to War, and moved [with his wife] to the United States. He loved America FAR more than he loved his country of birth..
One thing is certain tho'... Mrs Simpson did us a BIG favour in facilitating his removal from the throne.
Indeed. Perhaps we should erect a statue to her as the woman responsible for saving the "Great" in Britain?
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  #1546  
Old 09-02-2017, 10:57 AM
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Perhaps we should erect a statue...
I'd certainly 'chip in' !
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  #1547  
Old 09-02-2017, 11:03 AM
Majesty
 
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Noel Coward the composer and playwright, who knew Edward in the 1920s and '30s and was very unimpressed, once said that there should be a statue to Wallis Simpson erected in every town in Britain.
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  #1548  
Old 09-02-2017, 02:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
Noel Coward the composer and playwright, who knew Edward in the 1920s and '30s and was very unimpressed, once said that there should be a statue to Wallis Simpson erected in every town in Britain.
Didn't he famously say, of David/Edward "He hates me because I'm queer and because I know he's queer"?
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  #1549  
Old 09-02-2017, 02:26 PM
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Yes, apparently there were rumours about Edward's sexuality for years but nothing was ever substantiated. I think his appearance may have had something to do with it, very small and pink and white and gold, youthful looking into middle age. Edward actually seems to have been rabidly heterosexual, especially with married women, and personally I discount the gay rumours.
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  #1550  
Old 09-02-2017, 02:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
I would hope that Edward would have asked some questions about the role he was to play as King when the Nazis offered him the position, unless it literally was an offer he couldn't refuse! It is probable that they might have hidden their true intentions for the British from him and he could have felt that he might have been able to help his people as King, even if the situation was dire. Faced with the truth though, I do think Edward would have refused to countenance the measures. What would have happened to him in that case? Imprisonment in a castle somewhere, an accident...who knows. It's all hypothetical anyway.

Hitler did regard the English as Saxon and therefore Teuton but I think his admiration for them ceased when they refused to come to the negotiating table after Dunkirk, then after the Blitz, when an offer was put in a speech Adolf made to his faithful minions in Germany in the last months of 1940. They held out, he thought they were cretins for refusing his offer and I don't think there was too much tolerance or admiration on his part left by the end of 1940.
|no, probably not. I think he would regard tehm as defeated and despise them. but I don't know if David was the type to ask hard questions. he might have been very pleased to be restored to the throne, to have Wallis as his queen.. and managed to turn a blind eye. He never seems to have learned to hide his apparnet belief AFTER the War, that "Hitler wasn't such a bad chap".. so brains weren't his storng point and admiring right wing dictators was something he was prone to do.. like many other upper class folks.
I think David would have been very happy at least at first to become King again.. then maybe he mgith have felt that as a "pro Hitler king" he could use his limited power to help his people.. but if things didn't go that way, I honestly don't know how much he would have protested. And of course if he did complain too much, he would have problably been removed to Germany to soemting like house arrest, as happened to the Belgian King.
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  #1551  
Old 09-02-2017, 02:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
Yes, apparently there were rumours about Edward's sexuality for years but nothing was ever substantiated. I think his appearance may have had something to do with it, very small and pink and white and gold, youthful looking into middle age. Edward actually seems to have been rabidly heterosexual, especially with married women, and personally I discount the gay rumours.
Please allow my psychology background to emerge momentarily! His boyish 'pinkness' was very likely the result of have developed orchitis after a prepubescent bout of mumps. It could arguably have resulted in emotional as well as sexual retardation. You refer to him being "rabidly heterosexual" but who, of his lovers, was going to say he was rubbish in the sack? The onus would have fallen on their own prowess. I would never dismiss latent homosexuality. I also feel that Wallis's sexuality was, shall we say, interesting?
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  #1552  
Old 09-02-2017, 02:54 PM
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Actually I have read that several of his more obscure lovers, in various parts of the Empire, did hint that Edward wasn't up to much in the sack, Speedy Gonzales, if you get what I mean. When I wrote 'rabidly' I didn't mean that he was lover of the century, just that he had many sleeping companions (often willing married ladies) wherever he travelled, and no homosexual lover has ever come out of the woodwork to tell tales.
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  #1553  
Old 09-02-2017, 03:01 PM
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It ha nothing to do with his sexual performance, it has to do with his sexual orientation. And I agree that he slept with women, not men.
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  #1554  
Old 09-02-2017, 03:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Denville View Post
It ha nothing to do with his sexual performance, it has to do with his sexual orientation. And I agree that he slept with women, not men.
No, it certainly wouldn't have had an effect on his libido, but I think 'dear' Noel could have sensed something in him that he'd have preferred was kept hidden.
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  #1555  
Old 09-02-2017, 03:07 PM
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I think that Coward just wanted to believe that Edward was homosexual...
if he had been, I think it woudl have come out by now, just as it has that George D of Kent had male as well as female lovers. and it hasn't.
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  #1556  
Old 10-09-2017, 05:51 PM
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I read Philip Ziegler's authorized biography about King Edward VIII (Duke of Windsor) and I am about to read "That Woman" about the Duchess of Windsor. In the process of reading Kenneth Rose's biography on George V, I found out about the "gland" problem that the royal family felt that Duke of Windsor had. It was not even mentioned in the authorized biography. I am currently reading the Bradford book on George VI and have found that the description of the Abdication crisis gives greater detail than the authorized biography by Ziegler did, or at least I learned more details. I am truly fascinated ("appalled" is a better word) by the Duke of Windsor. Can anyone recommend anymore books on him that are trustworthy -- not just gossip? Thanks.
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  #1557  
Old 10-09-2017, 09:55 PM
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I very much enjoyed 'Edward VIII: Road to Abdication' by Frances Donaldson. It was greatly admired when it came out and it was one of the first books I ever read about the Abdication, (though it deals with his whole life.)

In defence of some of these biographies, you aren't going to get ALL the details of a person's life, even in the authorised ones, in one book. That's why it's always best to get a more rounded picture from several different sources. I count on Zeigler actually, for a really full account of the Abdication and many other events of Edward's life because it's so well researched.

By the way, I don't know whether you read 'Prince Charmless', an extract from the Daily Fail that was posted earlier in this thread. It's a very interesting extract from a view of David by one of his long time and closest aides.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ml?mrn_rm=als1

This is an elderly page I've just found which I've posted below which gives some of the books written about the Duke and Duchess. Put some titles in on Google and see what comes up about them, I'd suggest! .

Letters between the two of them are always fascinating as well. I've read 'Letters from a Prince' also on that list which were letters to Freda Dudley Ward 1918 -21. I think you'll find that book very interesting in revealing parts of Edward's character when in love.

I doubt you'd be able to get an affordable copy now anywhere unfortunately, but the book 'The Green Baize Door' by Ernest King on the list is by Edward's personal servant, who was with him for a very long time. I read it long, long ago and it gave another point of view on the complexities of Edward VIII.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2ZPWS3X
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  #1558  
Old 10-10-2017, 05:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
I very much enjoyed 'Edward VIII: Road to Abdication' by Frances Donaldson. It was greatly admired when it came out and it was one of the first books I ever read about the Abdication, (though it deals with his whole life.)

In defence of some of these biographies, you aren't going to get ALL the details of a person's life, even in the authorised ones, in one book. That's why it's always best to get a more rounded picture from several different sources. I count on Zeigler actually, for a really full account of the Abdication and many other events of Edward's life because it's so well researched.

By the way, I don't know whether you read 'Prince Charmless', an extract from the Daily Fail that was posted earlier in this thread. It's a very interesting extract from a view of David by one of his long time and closest aides.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ml?mrn_rm=als1

This is an elderly page I've just found which I've posted below which gives some of the books written about the Duke and Duchess. Put some titles in on Google and see what comes up about them, I'd suggest! .

Letters between the two of the are always fascinating as well. I've read 'Letters from a Prince' also on that list which were letters to Freda Dudley Ward 1918 -21. I think you'll find that book very interesting in revealing parts of Edward's character when in love.

I doubt you'd be able to get an affordable copy now anywhere unfortunately, but the book 'The Green Baize Door' by Ernest King on the list is by Edward's personal servant, who was with him for a very long time. I read it long, long ago and it gave another point of view on the complexities of Edward VIII.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2ZPWS3X
Thank you so much. I will look at those sources. It is so interesting how reading different books gives a broader perspective. I think I am going to try to find Lascelles entire book.
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  #1559  
Old 10-10-2017, 05:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curryong View Post
I very much enjoyed 'Edward VIII: Road to Abdication' by Frances Donaldson. It was greatly admired when it came out and it was one of the first books I ever read about the Abdication, (though it deals with his whole life.)

In defence of some of these biographies, you aren't going to get ALL the details of a person's life, even in the authorised ones, in one book. That's why it's always best to get a more rounded picture from several different sources. I count on Zeigler actually, for a really full account of the Abdication and many other events of Edward's life because it's so well researched.

By the way, I don't know whether you read 'Prince Charmless', an extract from the Daily Fail that was posted earlier in this thread. It's a very interesting extract from a view of David by one of his long time and closest aides.

Prince Charmless: A damning portrait of Edward VIII | Daily Mail Online

This is an elderly page I've just found which I've posted below which gives some of the books written about the Duke and Duchess. Put some titles in on Google and see what comes up about them, I'd suggest! .

Letters between the two of the are always fascinating as well. I've read 'Letters from a Prince' also on that list which were letters to Freda Dudley Ward 1918 -21. I think you'll find that book very interesting in revealing parts of Edward's character when in love.

I doubt you'd be able to get an affordable copy now anywhere unfortunately, but the book 'The Green Baize Door' by Ernest King on the list is by Edward's personal servant, who was with him for a very long time. I read it long, long ago and it gave another point of view on the complexities of Edward VIII.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2ZPWS3X
Thank you so much. I will look at those sources. It is so interesting how reading different books gives a broader perspective.
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  #1560  
Old 10-17-2017, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Osipi View Post
I did a bit of sleuthing and found a very interesting reputable source (The Telegraph) to confirm that David did indeed threaten suicide should Wallis ever leave him. Not only does this mention that threat but this is an excerpt from a book called "That Woman: A Life of Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor" by Anne Sebba. It was also made into a documentary that was shown on British channel 4 (I'm presuming as I don't know British channels) called "Wallis Simpson: the Secret Letters".

Its a very interesting read I think and gives a good insight into Wallis while she was going through her divorce from Ernest Simpson.

Wallis Simpson's secret letters to her ex-husband - Telegraph
I am currently reading that book and something interesting stood out to me last night as I was reading. I am at the part where they are going through their divorce and it is talking about how the situation between Wallis and David got out of control. It said that she had told Ernest at the beginning of the affair with David that the fling was okay because it would not last forever. My first thought was how could Ernest have possibly been okay with his wife having an affair?!? This book does talk about him being a staunch Monarchist so could he have been a little flattered that the King found his wife desirable? I have read before that there were men who did not "mind" their wives being mistresses of a king because of the favor the husbands received at court as a result of it. Was this Ernest's attitude?
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