The Royal Forums Coat of Arms


Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #361  
Old 08-29-2021, 07:56 AM
JR76's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Malmö, Sweden
Posts: 3,670
Quote:
Originally Posted by fandesacs2003 View Post
I don't really understand the rules of use of the black mantilla, for women not very closed to the deceased. Pcs Caroline wore one, but queen Sofia didn't cover her head. I noticed that most of the ladies had not had covered (hat or mantilla) does anyone know the protocol for this.
I remember on late Prince Rainier funeral both his daughters were wearing long heavy mantillas covering also shoulders. But yesterday princess Tatiana was uncovered.

Sent from my SM-A426B using The Royals Community mobile app
While the custom of covering your head in church used to be followed by most Catholic women, today it's use seems to be a matter of personal preference. Princess Caroline, by the looks of it, favour wearing a veil for funerals and a hat for other church services.
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #362  
Old 08-29-2021, 09:22 AM
Duc_et_Pair's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: City, Netherlands
Posts: 11,202
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR76 View Post
While the custom of covering your head in church used to be followed by most Catholic women, today it's use seems to be a matter of personal preference. Princess Caroline, by the looks of it, favour wearing a veil for funerals and a hat for other church services.
Máxima has the same habit: hats for official events and protestant funerals, mantilla for catholic funerals:

Funeral of the Duke of Parma: https://c8.alamy.com/compes/d5beb9/e...ijk-d5beb9.jpg
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #363  
Old 08-29-2021, 09:31 AM
An Ard Ri's Avatar
Super Moderator
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: An Iarmhí, Ireland
Posts: 32,068
Mantillas are still traditional in parts of Spain, France and Italy and have been worn by many royal ladies .They can be worn at funerals, meeting the Pope or at a Solemn Mass.

They used to be widely worn by Roman Catholic females at Mass up until Vatican II when the rules were relaxed.
My mother still has her black lace mantilla.

Queen Letizia
https://www.pinterest.ie/pin/5981411995638194/

Queen Maxima
https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/7239...visual-search/

https://www.ppe-agency.com/preview.p...ktype=&search=

Queen Paola
https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/4730...visual-search/

Catholic Mantilla - Will You Mantilla With Me?: Queen Paola at a funeral in 2009

Queen Sofia of Spain
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-yXNVkpaQZ6...eina-sofia.jpg

The Princess of Hanover
https://www.gettyimages.ie/detail/ne...?adppopup=true

https://www.gettyimages.ie/detail/ne...?adppopup=true

The Princess of Hanover and Princess Antoinette of Monaco
https://www.zimbio.com/photos/Prince...Inside+Service
Reply With Quote
  #364  
Old 08-29-2021, 11:45 AM
Courtier
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Hamilton, Canada
Posts: 683
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR76 View Post
While the custom of covering your head in church used to be followed by most Catholic women, today it's use seems to be a matter of personal preference. Princess Caroline, by the looks of it, favour wearing a veil for funerals and a hat for other church services.


Why did Catholic women have to cover their heads in church anyway? The traditional Catholic Church still does, by the way.
Reply With Quote
  #365  
Old 08-29-2021, 12:12 PM
An Ard Ri's Avatar
Super Moderator
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: An Iarmhí, Ireland
Posts: 32,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahedwards2 View Post
Why did Catholic women have to cover their heads in church anyway? The traditional Catholic Church still does, by the way.
The Mantilla was worn as a mark of respect for the Eucharist during Mass.
Unmarried girls wore a white lace mantilla and married/widowed women wore black lace.

The Tridentines have revived the tradition and are actually quite common here in Ireland again with the increase in popularity of the Latin Mass.
Reply With Quote
  #366  
Old 08-29-2021, 12:35 PM
Courtier
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Hamilton, Canada
Posts: 683
Quote:
Originally Posted by An Ard Ri View Post
The Mantilla was worn as a mark of respect for the Eucharist during Mass.
Unmarried girls wore a white lace mantilla and married/widowed women wore black lace.

The Tridentines have revived the tradition and are actually quite common here in Ireland again with the increase in popularity of the Latin Mass.


How was covering your head a mark of respect for the Eucharist?
Reply With Quote
  #367  
Old 08-29-2021, 12:44 PM
Osipi's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: On the west side of North up from Back, United States
Posts: 16,776
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahedwards2 View Post
How was covering your head a mark of respect for the Eucharist?
As we see in many cultures today still, women covered their hair as a form of modesty. It may seem archaic but women's hair was one of their "marks" of beauty and allure. A woman covers her hair in respect for the eucharist as it serves to keep from distracting attention away from it.

I grew up in the Catholic church and I *never* entered the church without someone on my head. Round lace chaplets were the norm. Of course, this was in the 50s and 60s.

They looked like this: https://www.ebay.com/itm/283818292101
__________________
To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment. ~~ Ralph Waldo Emerson ~~
Reply With Quote
  #368  
Old 08-29-2021, 01:14 PM
Somebody's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Somewhere, Suriname
Posts: 6,661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Osipi View Post
As we see in many cultures today still, women covered their hair as a form of modesty. It may seem archaic but women's hair was one of their "marks" of beauty and allure. A woman covers her hair in respect for the eucharist as it serves to keep from distracting attention away from it.

I grew up in the Catholic church and I *never* entered the church without someone on my head. Round lace chaplets were the norm. Of course, this was in the 50s and 60s.

They looked like this: https://www.ebay.com/itm/283818292101
Sorry, had to chuckle that you never entered the church without SOMEONE on your head...

In some reformed churches in the Netherlands it is still customary for women (and girls) to cover their head but they normally wear a hat (or beret (like this one or in a lighter color) for teenagers or younger women - which is what I borrowed from my mother-in-law (who still had some from when she was younger) when I had to wear head covering for a funeral).
Reply With Quote
  #369  
Old 08-29-2021, 01:24 PM
Majesty
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Pittsburgh, United States
Posts: 7,240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Osipi View Post
As we see in many cultures today still, women covered their hair as a form of modesty. It may seem archaic but women's hair was one of their "marks" of beauty and allure. A woman covers her hair in respect for the eucharist as it serves to keep from distracting attention away from it.

I grew up in the Catholic church and I *never* entered the church without someone on my head. Round lace chaplets were the norm. Of course, this was in the 50s and 60s.

They looked like this: https://www.ebay.com/itm/283818292101

Nowadays, however, it is not common for women to wear veils or mantillas at Mass in the US or other countries with large Catholic populations in the Americas like Brazil.
Reply With Quote
  #370  
Old 08-29-2021, 01:29 PM
Duc_et_Pair's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: City, Netherlands
Posts: 11,202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
Nowadays, however, it is not common for women to wear veils or mantillas at Mass in the US or other countries with large Catholic populations in the Americas like Brazil.
That is true. But it is not common either to wear hats and many royal ladies still do. It is just part of decorum.
Reply With Quote
  #371  
Old 08-29-2021, 01:48 PM
Osipi's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: On the west side of North up from Back, United States
Posts: 16,776
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebody View Post
Sorry, had to chuckle that you never entered the church without SOMEONE on your head...

In some reformed churches in the Netherlands it is still customary for women (and girls) to cover their head but they normally wear a hat (or beret (like this one or in a lighter color) for teenagers or younger women - which is what I borrowed from my mother-in-law (who still had some from when she was younger) when I had to wear head covering for a funeral).
Oooops! Someone on my head should bring me more coffee as I'm in a brain fog it seems. Got coffee? Too funny.
__________________
To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment. ~~ Ralph Waldo Emerson ~~
Reply With Quote
  #372  
Old 08-29-2021, 02:18 PM
Courtier
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Hamilton, Canada
Posts: 683
How old are Catholic girls when they cover their head for the first time? At my cousin’s wedding, his wife is traditional Catholic (he converted and went through RCIA before they got married) and even the 5-year-old flower girl wore a veil; she looked just like a girl on her First Communion day, but wasn’t old enough for that yet.
Reply With Quote
  #373  
Old 08-29-2021, 04:29 PM
An Ard Ri's Avatar
Super Moderator
Royal Blogger
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: An Iarmhí, Ireland
Posts: 32,068
The Infanta Elena of Spain wearing a traditional Spanish mantilla

https://www.pinterest.ie/pin/242983342368316378/

https://www.pinterest.ca/pin/301389400037993716/

http://estaticos2.ileon.com/resource...DSC03237dn.jpg

The late Infanta Pilar

http://www.revistanaval.com/imaxes/l...a_f102_01a.jpg

The late Princess Grace
https://www.pinterest.ie/pin/5753349...visual-search/
Reply With Quote
  #374  
Old 08-29-2021, 08:02 PM
CyrilVladisla's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Conneaut, United States
Posts: 7,640
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahedwards2 View Post
How old are Catholic girls when they cover their head for the first time? At my cousin’s wedding, his wife is traditional Catholic (he converted and went through RCIA before they got married) and even the 5-year-old flower girl wore a veil; she looked just like a girl on her First Communion day, but wasn’t old enough for that yet.
I have attended Latin Masses. Four year old girls wore veils.
Reply With Quote
  #375  
Old 08-30-2021, 03:13 AM
Duc_et_Pair's Avatar
Imperial Majesty
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: City, Netherlands
Posts: 11,202
In traditional Dutch Protestant communities it is still expected to wear hats for church: https://images.rd.nl/fill/crop:1024:...b5bb846bba.jpg
__________________

Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
addressing a royal, etiquette, protocol


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Italian Court Etiquette and Protocol SaxeundGotha Royal Families of Italy 17 03-31-2021 01:40 PM
Court Etiquette and Ceremonial SaxeundGotha Royal Families of France 30 01-29-2013 09:46 PM
Protocol and Etiquette: a Very Royal Perspective Elspeth General Royal Discussion Archive 17 05-24-2009 05:49 AM
Máxima's Protocol and Etiquette Education ashelen King Willem-Alexander, Queen Máxima and family 85 01-12-2008 02:10 AM




Popular Tags
america archie mountbatten-windsor asia birth britain britannia british british royal family buckingham palace camilla camilla's family camilla parker-bowles camilla parker bowles carolin china chinese ming dynasty asia asian emperor royalty qing chinese clarence house colorblindness commonwealth countries coronation crown jewels customs duchess of sussex duke of cambridge duke of sussex edward vii elizabeth ii family life fashion and style gemstones george vi gradenigo harry and meghan hello! henry viii highgrove hochberg house of windsor hypothetical monarchs japan japanese imperial family japan history kensington palace king edward vii lili mountbatten-windsor line of succession list of rulers medical meghan markle monarchist movements monarchists monarchy mongolia names nara period pless politics prince harry queen elizabeth ii royal ancestry solomon j solomon spanish royal family st edward sussex suthida thai royal family tradition united states of america wales welsh


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:05 PM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2021
Jelsoft Enterprises
×