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  #481  
Old 03-16-2021, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maria-olivia View Post
The Belgian Kings are Member of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece.
King Albert II received the Spanish Order from King Juan Carlos during his State Visit.
They never wear the Order ??

King Albert II wore the collar of the Order of the Golden Fleece at the wedding of the Prince of Asturias and Doña Letizia Ortiz Rocasolano in 2014. You can see him with the collar of the Fleece (plus the sash and the grand cross of Carlos III) around 24:00 in the video below.


https://youtu.be/WgYJzGJhZ7o?t=1494


King Albert also wore the collar of the Order of the Seraphim at the wedding of the Crown Princess of Sweden and Mr Daniel Westling in 2010. You can see his collar of the Seraphim around 44:30 in the video below when he is leaving the church with Queen Paola. As far as I can tell, King Albert didn't wear any sash on that occasion. Queen Paola's art deco tiara is unfortunately barely visible in the video.


https://youtu.be/fzgYGWI5Flo?t=2666


Quote:
Originally Posted by Duc_et_Pair View Post
There are collars of the Leopoldsorde but after Baudouin the Kings stopped the use of it:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...rtius_Luik.jpg


The King wore a collar on his wedding day with Doña Fabiola de Mora y Aragón, that does not look alike the Leopoldsorde. I think the collar of the Orden Isabel la Católica.
https://gisterennogvandaag.files.wor...a.14.jpg?w=576


King Willem I (Sovereign over the three Benelux states) was given designs for collars for Orders for the new kingdom. But the King preferred simplicity and found the designs too ostentatious.

Collars are indeed ostentatious, but there aren't many of them, not least because the number of members with collars in orders that still have them is limited. Collars are also rarely worn these days (only occasionally in a few royal weddings, state dinners, or diplomatic receptions).


The United Kingdom is the only country in Europe AFAIK that still holds order chapters when collars are used (e.g. Garter Day) and, as you may have noticed, the Queen also wears the collar of the Order of the Garter at the State opening of Parliament. Wikipedia also has an extensive list of collar days for the different British orders throughout the year.


I personally think that collars are a great tradition and I would like to see them worn more often as they used to be in the Middle Ages and the early Modern Age (I know, it sounds terribly old-fashioned).
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  #482  
Old 03-16-2021, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
The following royal or dynastic orders (usually the highest or most prestigious in their respective countries) are awarded in a single grade of knight/lady or member by reigning monarchs (in chronological order):



Order of the Garter
Order of the Golden Fleece

Order of the Thistle
Order of the Elephant
Order of the Seraphim
Now that you mention it, have any of the European national or royal orders amended their regulations to the effect that women members may also bear the title of Knight (or in feminine form if applicable)?
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  #483  
Old 03-16-2021, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Tatiana Maria View Post
Now that you mention it, have any of the European national or royal orders amended their regulations to the effect that women members may also bear the title of Knight (or in feminine form if applicable)?

You would have to ask our friend Muhler, but I think the female members of the Order of the Elephant are called "knights". Likewise, I think the female Grand Crosses of the Order of the Netherlands Lion are also called Knights.


In the UK, the female members of the orders of the Garter and of the Thistle are called "Ladies" and the female holders of higher grades in other orders (Bath, MG, RVO, and BE) are called "Dames" (Grand Cross or Commander).

In Spain, modern order regulations generally avoid the words "Caballero" or "Dama" referring instead to grades like "Collar", "Gran Cruz", "Encomienda", "Cruz", etc. In the royal decrees awarding the order of the Golden Fleece, however, King Juan Carlos used the words "Vengo en nombrarle Caballero de la insigne Orden del Toisón de Oro" for men and "Vengo en concederle el Collar de la Insigne Orden del Toisón de Oro" for women, see Example 1 for King Harald V and Example 2 for Queen Elizabeth II . Princess Leonor's diploma, which could be seen briefly on the video of her induction ceremony, also referred to her being awarded "the Collar" of the Order of the Golden Fleece, with no reference to the words "Knight" or "Dame".


Likewise, in the Swedish Order of the Seraphim, Knight is used for men and Member is used for women or, in the past, members of the clergy.
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  #484  
Old 03-16-2021, 12:44 PM
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King Juan Carlos and Prince Felipe wore the short golden Collar of the Order of the Golden Fleece. King Albert II wore the larger Silver Collar of Isabella la C. second Collar wearing by King Juan Carlos.
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  #485  
Old 03-16-2021, 02:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maria-olivia View Post
King Juan Carlos and Prince Felipe wore the short golden Collar of the Order of the Golden Fleece. King Albert II wore the larger Silver Collar of Isabella la C. second Collar wearing by King Juan Carlos.

You may be right, but the Wikipedia doesn't list the Collar of the Order of Isabella the Catholic as one of the Spanish decorations held by King Albert II; it lists only the Collar of the Order of the Golden Fleece (awarded in 1994) and the Grand Cross of the Order of Carlos III (awarded in 1977). Based on that information and on the design of the collar itself as seen in the video, I am inclined to believe that it was indeed the Spanish Golden Fleece collar that King Albert II was wearing on that particular day.



You are also right that King Juan Carlos and the Prince of Asturias were both wearing the collar of the Order of the Golden Fleece at the wedding. I think, however, that the second collar worn by King Juan Carlos was the collar of the Order of Carlos III, rather than the collar of Isabella the Catholic. There is a close-up view of the two collars at the minute linked below in the video. Could other members confirm what collar that is?


https://youtu.be/WgYJzGJhZ7o?t=2215
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  #486  
Old 03-16-2021, 03:56 PM
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This thread is one of the most interesting of the Royal Forums.

Mbruno on post 50 our King Albert II wears the Sash of the Spanish Order of the Golden Fleece , He just received from King Juan Carlos during his State Visit in Belgium. He had already the Colar of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece.. But for his Wedding , He and his Father wore the Order of Malta. WHY ??
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  #487  
Old 03-16-2021, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
You would have to ask our friend Muhler, but I think the female members of the Order of the Elephant are called "knights". Likewise, I think the female Grand Crosses of the Order of the Netherlands Lion are also called Knights.


In the UK, the female members of the orders of the Garter and of the Thistle are called "Ladies" and the female holders of higher grades in other orders (Bath, MG, RVO, and BE) are called "Dames" (Grand Cross or Commander).

In Spain, modern order regulations generally avoid the words "Caballero" or "Dama" referring instead to grades like "Collar", "Gran Cruz", "Encomienda", "Cruz", etc. In the royal decrees awarding the order of the Golden Fleece, however, King Juan Carlos used the words "Vengo en nombrarle Caballero de la insigne Orden del Toisón de Oro" for men and "Vengo en concederle el Collar de la Insigne Orden del Toisón de Oro" for women, see Example 1 for King Harald V and Example 2 for Queen Elizabeth II . Princess Leonor's diploma, which could be seen briefly on the video of her induction ceremony, also referred to her being awarded "the Collar" of the Order of the Golden Fleece, with no reference to the words "Knight" or "Dame".


Likewise, in the Swedish Order of the Seraphim, Knight is used for men and Member is used for women or, in the past, members of the clergy.
Thank you!

It appears to be a general rule that female members of Dutch chivalric orders are known as knights; the royal website references princesses becoming knights of the House Order of the Golden Lion of Nassau.

Spain appears to be playing coy with the question of how to refer to female members of orders.
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  #488  
Old 03-17-2021, 10:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post





King Albert also wore the collar of the Order of the Seraphim at the wedding of the Crown Princess of Sweden and Mr Daniel Westling in 2010. You can see his collar of the Seraphim around 44:30 in the video below when he is leaving the church with Queen Paola. As far as I can tell, King Albert didn't wear any sash on that occasion. Queen Paola's art deco tiara is unfortunately barely visible in the video.


https://youtu.be/fzgYGWI5Flo?t=2666




.

Most attending reigning Kings (not sure about King Abullah) whore the Collar of the Order of the Serpahim at the swweish royal Wedding and only King Harald also wore the sahs of the order of St. Olav with it what hje also did at the ruby Jubilee of Queen margrethe in 2012. However at her Silver Jubilee in 1997 he only wore the Collar of the Order of the Elephant.
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  #489  
Old 03-17-2021, 01:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stefan View Post
Most attending reigning Kings (not sure about King Abullah) whore the Collar of the Order of the Serpahim at the swweish royal Wedding and only King Harald also wore the sahs of the order of St. Olav with it what hje also did at the ruby Jubilee of Queen margrethe in 2012. However at her Silver Jubilee in 1997 he only wore the Collar of the Order of the Elephant.

It is customary to wear the collar of a foreign order with the sash of a national order as King Harald did.



For example, Emperor Akhito in the clip below is wearing the collar of the order of the Golden Fleece with the Grand Cordon, I believe, of the Japanese order of the Chrysanthemum. Conversely, King Felipe VI is wearing the collar of the order of the Chrysanthemum with the sash of the collar of the Spanish order of Carlos III. He is also wearing the necklace insignia of the order of the Golden Fleece (as the King of Spain always does in formal occasions).








It is also possible, however, to use the collar and sash of the same order, although IMHO that is redundant. For example, in the clip below, the president of the Portuguese Republic, Senhor Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa, is wearing both the collar and the sash of the collar of the Spanish order of Carlos III. I am not very familiar with the Portuguese decorations, but I believe King Felipe VI is wearing the chain of the order of Liberty with the sash of the order of the Tower and the Sword, so he is not repeating two insignias of the same order.





In the final clip, President Martín Vizcarra of Peru is making the same "mistake" as the Portuguese president. In this case, he is wearing both the collar and the sash of the collar, I think, of the Spanish order of Isabella the Catholic. King Felipe VI again wears the medal (?) of the Order of the Sun of Peru with his own sash of the collar of the Spanish order of Carlos III. His Majesty is also wearing the bigger version of the Sovereign's necklace insignia of the Spanish Golden Fleece.







Note how the sash of the First Lady of Peru differs visibly from the President's, even though they are wearing the same order. That is because, unlike in British orders, Collar and Grand Cross are two separate grades in the Spanish orders and they have separate sashes with different designs (respectively the sash of the Grand Cross and the sash of the Collar). In addition, there are different sizes in practice for male (Knight's) and female (Dame's) sashes. That is described e.g. in Art.10 of the the latest regulations of the order of Isabella the Catholic .
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  #490  
Old 03-17-2021, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
It is customary to wear the collar of a foreign order with the sash of a national order as King Harald did.



For example, Emperor Akhito in the clip below is wearing the collar of the order of the Golden Fleece with the Grand Cordon, I believe, of the Japanese order of the Chrysanthemum. Conversely, King Felipe VI is wearing the collar of the order of the Chrysanthemum with the sash of the collar of the Spanish order of Carlos III. He is also wearing the necklace insignia of the order of the Golden Fleece (as the King of Spain always does in formal occasions).








It is also possible, however, to use the collar and sash of the same order, although IMHO that is redundant. For example, in the clip below, the president of the Portuguese Republic, Senhor Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa, is wearing both the collar and the sash of the collar of the Spanish order of Carlos III. I am not very familiar with the Portuguese decorations, but I believe King Felipe VI is wearing the chain of the order of Liberty with the sash of the order of the Tower and the Sword, so he is not repeating two insignias of the same order.





In the final clip, President Martín Vizcarra of Peru is making the same "mistake" as the Portuguese president. In this case, he is wearing both the collar and the sash of the collar, I think, of the Spanish order of Isabella the Catholic. King Felipe VI again wears the medal (?) of the Order of the Sun of Peru with his own sash of the collar of the Spanish order of Carlos III. His Majesty is also wearing the bigger version of the Sovereign's necklace insignia of the Spanish Golden Fleece.







Note how the sash of the First Lady of Peru differs visibly from the President's, even though they are wearing the same order. That is because, unlike in British orders, Collar and Grand Cross are two separate grades in the Spanish orders and they have separate sashes with different designs (respectively the sash of the Grand Cross and the sash of the Collar). In addition, there are different sizes in practice for male (Knight's) and female (Dame's) sashes. That is described e.g. in Art.10 of the the latest regulations of the order of Isabella the Catholic .

So why was King Harald the only one who did it at the swedish Royal Wedding. And why did he wear with the sash in Denmark in 2012 but without in 1997?
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  #491  
Old 03-17-2021, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stefan View Post
So why was King Harald the only one who did it at the swedish Royal Wedding. And why did he wear with the sash in Denmark in 2012 but without in 1997?

I guess it is optional. Either you wear a collar only, as King Albert II did in Sweden, or you wear the collar of an order with the sash of another, as King Albert II did in Spain and King Harald V did in Sweden. Both are correct.



What I think is not so correct, or at least would be illogical, is to wear the collar and the sash of the same order at the same time as the presidents of Peru and Portugal did on those clips. That is because, for the order grades whose insignia includes both a sash and a collar, the sash is meant to be worn specifically on those occasions when the collar is not required by protocol. The regulations of the Spanish orders actually explain that point, e.g., in the regulations of the order of Carlos III:


Quote:
3.º Gran Cruz del Collar: las personas que estén en posesión del Collar podrán usar, en actos cuyo ceremonial no requiera ostentar el mismo, una Gran Cruz cuyas características se describen a continuación:


Será una banda de seda, de 101 milímetros de ancho, de color azul celeste, con dos franjas blancas, de seis milímetros de ancho, que corren paralelas a cuatro milímetros del borde de la cinta. Dicha banda se unirá en sus extremos mediante un rosetón picado, confeccionado con la misma tela que la banda, del cual penderá la venera de la Real Orden, cuyas dimensiones máximas serán de 50 por 75 milímetros. [...]
As I mentioned before, in the UK, where all orders of knighthood still have collars, there seem to be clear rules on when collars are required or not. For example, collars are worn at the annual services/installation ceremonies of the Garter and the Thistle, at coronations, or at the State Opening of Parliament, and the Chancery of the Royal Orders of Knighthood has a list of designated "collar days" when collars may be worn. However, collars like the collar of the Garter are not expected to be worn for example at a state dinner, in which case only the standard Grand Cross with the sash and star would be appropriate.

To be fair though, Queen Elizabeth II herself also wears foreign collars at state banquets. In the clip below, for example, she is wearing the collar of the Brazilian order of the Southern Cross (originally an Imperial order, now awarded by the Republic). But note that she was NOT wearing the collar of the Southern Cross with the corresponding sash, and neither was Queen Margrethe II of Denmark in the following clip. Both were correct again in my opinion.






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  #492  
Old 04-08-2021, 09:05 AM
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Most Exclusive Royal Orders of Knighthood

For comparison purposes, only single-grade orders were considered. The figures below are from different Wikipedia sources and, although they may be not exact, they are roughly correct. In the list, the term "knight" refers both to male and female members and also includes Royal Family and foreign members .


1. Order of the Garter (since 1348): 1,014 knights (English Wikipedia); average: 1.50 knight/year.

2. Order of the Elephant (since 1580): 860 knights (Danish Wikipedia); average: 1.95 knight/year.

3. Order of the Golden Fleece, Spanish branch (since 1430): 1,199 (French Wikipedia) or 1,201 (English Wikipedia) knights; average: 2.03 knights/ year.

4. Order of the Seraphim (since 1748): 883 knights; average: 3.2 knights/ year.


Notes


a) The first statutes of the Order of the Elephant date back to 1693 only, which is the official date of inception of the order. However, the Danish Wikipedia counts knights from the reign of Christian I in the 16th century, including members of the Fellowship of the Mother of God, which predated the Order of the Elephant. I chose to count knights only from 1580, when, according to the Danish Wikipedia, it is known for sure that a badge in the form of an elephant was awarded by King Frederik II to new knights.


b) From 1711 onwards, the Order of the Golden Fleece split into a Spanish branch under the Bourbon kings of Spain and an Austrian branch under the head of the House of Habsburg, later Habsburg-Lorraine. The figure shown above includes all knights appointed in the original Burgundian order (1430-1516) plus the knights appointed by kings or regents of Spain from 1516 to the present. Knights of the Austrian branch appointed after 1711 were not counted.

c) It would be interesting to add to the list the figures for the Order of the Thistle (the English Wikipedia has a list of only 248 knights since 1687, which is probably incomplete) and for the Supreme Order of the Most Holy Annunciation (Ordine Supremo della Santissima Annunziata) of the House of Savoy, and the Supreme Order of Christ awarded by the Pope (probably the most exclusive of the "grand orders").
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  #493  
Old 11-08-2021, 07:48 PM
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Non-exhaustive list of European orders in chronological order

Note orders that are still awarded by a reigning hereditary monarchy as part of the national system of honors are shown in boldface.


11th and 12th century military-religious orders


1. The Order of the Holy Sepulchre (est. circa 1099 in the Kingdom of Jerusalem, recognized 1113), still awarded semi-independently as the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem under the protection of Pope.

2. The Order of the Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem, also known as the Order of the Knights Hospitaller (est. 1099 in the Kingdom of Jerusalem, recognized 1113), succeeded today by the Catholic Sovereign Military Order of Malta, which awards knighthoods independently of any sovereign state, and by the Protestant Orders of St. John (in Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom), which award knoghthoods semi-independently under the protection of the Federal Republic of Germany, or the monarchs of the Netherlands, Sweden, or the United Kingdom.

3. The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon ; better known as the Order of the Knights Templar (est. circa 1118 in the Kingdom of Jerusalem., recognized 1129, disbanded 1312), succeeded by the Supreme Order of Christ (est. 1319), which is still (rarely) awarded by the Pope, and the Portuguese Military Order of Christ (est. 1319), which is currently awarded as an order of merit by the President of the Portuguese Republic (previously by or under the protection of the King of Portugal).

4. The Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem (est. circa 1119 in the Kingdom of Jerusalem), merged in Italy in 1572 into the Order of the Saints Maurice and Lazarus, still awarded today by the head of the House of Savoy (formerly the King of Italy).

5. The Military Order of St. Benedict of Aviz, better known simply as the Military Order of Aviz , spelled Avis in Portuguese (est. 1146), still awarded today as an order of merit by the President of the Portuguese Repiublic (previoulsy by or under the protection of the King of Portugal).

6. The Order of Calatrava (est. 1158 in the Kingdom of Castile, recognized 1164), still awarded today semi-independently under the protection of the King of Spain, but outside tthe national system of Spanish honors.

7. The Order of Alcantara (est. 1166 in the Kingdom of Leon, recognized 1177), still awarded today semi-independently under the protection of the King of Spain, but outside tthe national system of Spanish honors.

8. The Order of Santiago (est. 1170 in the Kingdom of Leon; recognized 1175), still awarded today semi-independently under the protection of the King of Spaiin, but outside tthe national system of Spanish honors.; also related to the Portuguese Military Order of St James of the Sword (est. 1172), which is still awarded as an order of merit by the President of the Portuguese Republic.

9. The Order of the Brothers of the German House of St Mary of Jerusalem, better known as the Teutonic Knights (est. circa 1190 in the Kingdom of Jerusalem), currently a religious order only, and no longer an order of chivalry although honorary knighthoods are still awarded.

10. The Order of Montesa (est. 1317 in the Kingdom of Aragon), still awarded today semi-independently under the protection of the King of Spain, but outside tthe national system of Spanish honors.


14th-16th century monarchical orders


11. The Most Noble Order of the Garter (est. 1348 in the Kingdom of England), still awarded today in the personal gift of the British monarch.

12. The Supreme Order of the Most Holy Annunciation, originally the Order of the Collar (est. 1362 in the County of Savoy), still awarded today by the head of the House of Savoy (formerly the King of Italy).

13. The Illustrious Order of the Golden Fleece (est. 1430 in Bruges by Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy; became a Spanish order in 1516), still awarded today by the King of Spain (as the dynastic successor to the Dukes of Burgundy) on his personal recommendation with endorsement (countersignature) of the Spanish prime minister and publication in the official State Gazette of Spain; the order is also awarded separately (since 1711) as a dynastic order by the head of the House of Habsburg or its successor, the House of Habsburg-Lorraine (formerly the Austro-Hungarian Emperor), who also claims the sovereignty of the order.

14. The Order of St. Hubert (est. 1445 in the Duchy of Jülich-Berg), still awarded today by the head of the House of Wittelsbach (formerly the King of Bavaria).

15. The Royal Military Order of the Tower and the Sword, (est. 1459 in the Kingdom of Portugal), succeeded in 1910 by the Ancient and Most Noble Military Order of the Tower and of the Sword, of the Valour, Loyalty and Merit , awarded today as an order of merit by the President of the Portuguese Republic (previously by the King of Portugal).

16. The Order of St Michel (est 1469 in the Kingdom of France), still awarded today as a dynastic order by the Bourbon-Anjou pretender to the defunct throne of France (previously awarded by the King of France).

17. The Sacred Military Constantinian Order of St George (est. circa 1545, became an order of the Duchy of Parma in 1699), still awarded today separately the head of the House of Bourbon-Parma and the head of the House of Bourbon-Two Siciles (formerly the King of the Two Siciles), who also claims the sovereignty of the order.

18. The Sacred and Military Order of St Stephen Pope and Martyr (est. 1561 in the Grand Duchy of Tuscany), still awarded today by the head of the House of Habsburg-Tuscany.

19. The Order of the Holy Spirit (est. 1578 in the Kingdom of France), still awarded today by the Bourbon-Anjou pretender to the defunct French throne (peviously by the King of France).
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Old 11-08-2021, 07:53 PM
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17th century monarchical orders

20. The Order of the Starry Cross (est. 1668 in the Holy Roman Empire), originally an order of chivalry exclusively for women, still awarded today as dynastic order (also exclusively for women) by the head of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine (formerly the Austro-Hungarian emperor).

21. The Order of the Dannebrog (est. 1671 in the Kingdom of Denmark), still awarded today nominally in the personal gift of the Danish monarch, but, in practice, on recommendation of the Danish government.

22. The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle (est. 1687 in the Kingdom of Scotland), still awarded today in the personal gift of the British monarch.

23. The Order of the Elephant (est. 1693 in the Kingdom of Denmark), still awarded today in the personal gift of the Danish monarch.

24. The Royal and Military Order of St Louis (est. 1693 in the Kingdom of France), previously awarded as a military order of merit by the King of France, still claimed by the Bourbon-Abjou pretender to the defunct French throne as a dynastic order, but not currently awarded.

25. The Order of St Andrew the Apostle the First Called (est. 1698 by Tsar Peter the Great of Russia), re-established in 1998 as an order of merit awarded by the President of the Russian Federation, but also awarded independently as a dynastic order by the Romanov pretender to the defunct Russian imperial throne.

18th century state and dynastic orders

26. The Order of the Black Eagle (est. 1701 in the Holy Roman Empire Electorate of Brandenburg), curently awarded as a dynastic order by the head of the House of Hohenzollern (previouly the German Emperor and King of Prussia).

27. The Imperial Order of St Catherine (est. 1714 by Tsar Peter the Great of Russia), revived as an order of merit of the Russian Federation in 2012 under the name Order of St. Catherine the Great , Martyr, but still also awarded independently as a dynastic order by the Romanov pretender to the defunct Russian imperial throne.

28. The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (est. 1725 in the Kingdom of Great Britain), still awarded by the British monarch on recommendation of the British government.

29. The Imperial Order of St Alexander Nevsky (est. 1725 in the Empire of Russia), currently awarded as dynastic order by the Romanov pretender to the defunct Russian imperial throne.

30. The Imperial Order of Saint Anna (est. 1735 in the Duchy of Holstein-Gottorp and the Empire of Russia), awarded as a dynastic order by the Romanov pretender to the defunct Russian imperial throne.

31. The Illustrious Royal Order of St. Januarius (est. 1738 in the Kingdom of Naples), currently awarded as a dynastic order by the head of the House of Bourbon-Two Siciles (formerly the King of the Two Siciles).

32. The Royal Military Order of Saint George for the Defense of the Faith and the Immaculate Conception, also known as the Royal Bavarian House Equestrian Order of Saint George (est. 1726 in the Holy Roman Empire Electorate of Bavaria), still awarded today by the head of the House of Wittelsbach (formerly the King of Bavaria).

33. The Royal Order of the Seraphim (est. 1748 in the Kingdom of Sweden), still awarded by the Swedish monarch, but restricted today to members of the Swedish Royal House (in the personal gift of the Swedish monarch), or heads of State and persons of equivalent rank (with the approval of the Swedish government).

34. The Royal Order of the Polar Star (est. 1748 in the Kingdom of Sweden), still awarded today by the Swedish monarch; appointments of members of the Swedish Royal House are in the personal gift of the King of Sweden; otherwise, appointments are on recommendation of the Swedish government.

35. The Royal Order of the Sword (est. 1748 in the Kingdom of Sweden), previously awarded by the Swedish monarch, currently dormant (i.e. , not awarded).

36. The Royal Order of Vasa (est. 1772 in the Kingdom of Sweden), previously awarded by the Swedish monarch currently dormant (i.e. , not awarded).

37. The Order of St Vladimir (est. 1762 in the Empire of Russia), now awarded as a dynastic order by the Romanov pretender to the defunct Russian throne.

38. The Order of St Stephen (est. 1764 in the Kingdom of Hungary), revived in 2011 as the Hungarian Order of St Stephen and currently awarded as an order of merit by the President of Hungary.

39. The Order of St George (est. 1769 in the Empire of Russia as a military order), revived in 2010 as a military order of merit currently awarded by the President of the Russian Federation.

40. The Royal and Distinguished Spanish Order of Charles III (est. 1771 in the Kingdom of Spain), now classified as a royal Spanish civil order and awarded by the Spanish monarch on recommendation and with countersignature of the Spanish prime minister.

41. The Royal Order of the Noble Ladies of Queen Maria Luisa (est. 1782 in the Kingdom of Spain), peviously awarded by the Spanish monarch as an order exclusively for women, currently dormant (i.e., not awarded).

42. The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick (est. 1783 in the Kingdom of Ireland), previously awarded by the British monarch, currently dormant (i.e., not awarded).
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  #495  
Old 11-08-2021, 08:03 PM
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19th and 20th century state and dynastic orders

43. The Order of the Queen Saint Isabel (est. 1801 in the Kingdom of Portugal), still awarded today as a dynastic order by the head of the House of Braganza (previously by the King of Portugal) as an order exclusively for women.

44. The House Order of the Rue Crown (est. 1807 in the Kingdom of Saxony), still awarded today as dynastic order of the House of Wettin (Saxony) , previously by the King of Saxony.

45. The Royal Order of Charles XIII (est. 1811 in the Kingdom of Sweden), still awarded today by the Swedish monarch independently of the Swedish government as an order of merit for high-ranking freemasons of the Protestant faith and not considered one of the royal Swedish orders of chivalry

46. The Royal and Military Order of St Ferdinand (est. 1811 in the Kingdom of Spain, confirmed 1815), still awarded today by the Spanish monarch on recommendation and with countersignature of the Minister of Defense and approval of the Council of Ministers.

47. The Royal and Military Order of St. Hermenegild (est. 1814 in the Kingdom of Spain), still awarded today by the Spanish monarch on recommendation and with countersignature of the Minister of Defense and approval of the Council of Ministers.

48. The Royal Order of Isabella the Catholic (est. 1815 in the Kingdom of Spain, originally as the Royal and American Order of Isabella the Catholic) , still awarded today by the Spanish monarch on recommendation and with countersignature of the Minister of Foreign Affairs and approval of the Council of Ministers.

49. The Military William’s Order (est. 1815 in the Kingdom of the Netherlands), still awarded today by the Dutch monarch on recommendation and with approval of the Dutch government.

50. The Order of the Netherlands Lion (est. 1815 in the Kingdom of the Netherlands), still awarded today by the Dutch monarch on recommendation and with approval of the Dutch government.

51. The Royal Guelphic Order (est. 1815 by the Prince Regent, later King George IV of the United Kingdom, as an order of the Kingdom of Hanover), still awarded today as a dynastic order of the House of Guelph (Hanover), previously by the King of Hanover.

52. The Order of St Joseph (est 1817 in the Grand Duchy of Tuscany), still awarded today as a dynastic order of the House of Habsburg-Tuscany.

53. The Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George (est. 1818 in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland), still awarded today by the British monarch on the recommendation of the British government or on recommendation of the government of a Commonwealth realm (in the latter case, as monarch of the respective realm).

54. The Order of the Immaculate Conception of Vila Viçosa (est. 1818 in the Kingdom of Portugal), still awarded today as a dynastic order by the head of the House of Braganza (previously by the King of Portugal).

55. The Order of the Redeemer (est. 1829 in the Kingdom of Greece), awarded today as an order of merit by the President of the Hellenic Republic, but also awarded independently as a dynastic order by the deposed former King Constantine II of the Hellenes.

56. The Order of the White Eagle (originally founded in 1705 as an order of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, established as an order of the Russian Empire in 1830), still awarded today as a dynastic order by the Romanov pretender to the Russian imperial throne; a separate order under the same name is also awarded today as an order of merit by the President of Poland.

57. The Order of St. Ludovico (est. 1829 in the Duchy of Lucca; order of the Duchy of Parma from 1836), still awarded today as a dynastic order by the head of the House of Bourbon-Parma.

58. The Civil Order of Savoy (est. 1831 in the Kingdom of Sardinia), still awarded today as a dynastic order by the head of the House of Savoy (formerly by the King of Italy).

59. The Order of Leopold (est. 1832 in the Kingdom of Belgium), still awarded today by the Belgian monarch on recommendation and with approval of the Belgian government.

60. The Order of St George (est. 1839 in the Kingdom of Hanover), stil awarded today as a dynastic order of the House of Guelph (Hanover), previously by the King of Hanover.

61. The Royal Order of St. Olav (est. 1847 in the Kingdom of Norway), still awarded today by the Norwegian monarch on recommendation of the order’s chapter.

62. The House Order of Hohenzollern (est. 1851 in the Kingdom of Prussia), still awarded today as a dynastic order by the the head of House of Hohenzollern (previously the King of Prussia and the German Emperor).

63. The Order of the Golden Lion of the House of Nassau (est. 1852 in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg), still awarded today by the Grand Duke of Luxembourg and rarely by the Dutch monarch, as a dynastic order in the personal gift of the monarch.

64. The Most Exalted Order of the Star of India (est. 1861 by Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom as Empress of India), currently dormant (i.e., no longer awarded).

65. The Order of the Crown of Italy (est. 1868 in the Kingdom of Italy), awarded until 1983 by the deposed former King Umberto II of Italy, currently inactive.

66. The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire (est. 1878 by Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom as Empress of India), currently dormant (i.e., no longer awarded).

67. The Imperial Order of the Crown of India (est. 1878 by Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom as Empress of India), currently dormant (i.e., no longer awarded).

68. The Order of the Crown (est. 1881 in the Kingdom of Romania), still awarded today as a dynastic order by the Custodian of the Romanian Crown.

69. The Order of the African Star (est. 1888 by King Leopold II of the Belgians as Sovereign of the Congo Free State), became a Belgian national order in 1908, currently dormant (i.e., no longer awarded).

70. The Royal Order of the Lion (est. 1891 by King Leopold II of the Belgians as Sovereign of the Congo Free State), became a Belgian national order in 1908, currently dormant (i.e., no longer awarded).

71. The Order of Orange-Nassau (est. 1892 in the Kingdom of the Netherlands), still awarded by the Dutch monarch on recommendation and with the approval of the Dutch government.

72. The Royal Victorian Order (est. 1896 in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland), still awarded today in the personal gift of the British monarch.

73. The Order of the Crown (est. 1897 by King Leopold II of the Belgians as Sovereign of the Congo Free State), became a Belgian national order in 1908, still awarded today by the Belgian monarch on recommendation and with approval of the Belgian government.

74. The Order of Leopold II (est. 1900 by King Leopold II of the Belgians as Sovereign of the Congo Free State), became a Belgian national order in 1908, still awarded today by the Belgian monarch on recommendation and with approval of the Belgian government.

75. The Order of Merit (est. 1902 in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland), still awarded today as a single-grade order of merit in the personal gift of the British monarch.

76. The Order of Alfonso XII (est. 1902 in the Kingdom of Spain, renamed the Civil Order of Alfonso X the Wise in 1939), still awarded today by the Spanish monarch on recommendation and with countersignature of the Minister of Education and approval of the Council of Ministers.

77. The Order of the House of Orange (est. 1905 in the Kingdom of the Netherlands), split in 1969 into the Order of the House of Orange, the Order of the Crown, and the Order for Loyalty and Merit, still awarded today in the personal gift of the Dutch monarch.

78. The Order of Charles I (est. 1905 in the Kingdom of Romania), still awarded today by the Custodian of the Romanian Crown.

79. The Order of Michael the Brave (est. 1916 in the Kingdom of Romania), re-established in 2000 as a military order of merit awarded by the President of Romania.

80. The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (est. 1917 in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland), still awarded today by the British monarch as an order of chivalry on the recommendation of British government or the government of a Commonwealth realm (in the latter case, as the monarch of the respective realm).

81. The Order of the Companions of Honour (est. 1917 in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland), still awarded today by the British monarch as a single-grade order of merit on the recommendation of British government or the government of a Commonwealth realm (in the latter case, as the monarch of the respective realm).

82. The Order of Civil Merit (est. 1926 in the Kingdom of Spain), still awarded today by the Spanish monarch on recommendation and with countersignature of the Minister of Foreign Affairs and approval of the Council of Ministers.

83. The Order of the Saints George and Constantine (est. 1936 in the Kingdom of Greece), still awarded today as a dynastic order by the deposed former King Constantine II of the Hellenes.

84. The Order of the Saints Olga and Sophia (est. 1936 in the Kingdom of Greece), still awarded today as a dynastic order by the deposed former King Constantine II of the Hellenes.

[To be completed]
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  #496  
Old 11-09-2021, 08:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
42. The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick (est. 1783 in the Kingdom of Ireland), previously awarded by the British monarch, currently dormant (i.e., not awarded).
There was some Anglo/Irish discussion about reviving the Order of St Patrick some years back under the Presidency of Mary McAleese but I doubt anything will happen under the ubber egalitarian President Higgins.
The last knight of the Order was HRH Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester who died in 1972.
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