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  #681  
Old 07-06-2021, 11:34 AM
Prinsara's Avatar
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Good luck to GG Simon; that (felt like), or was, a very long vacancy.
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  #682  
Old 07-06-2021, 11:50 AM
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That seems like a good move. Good luck to her.

I've always found the treaty between the First Nations and the Crown *directly* very interesting.
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  #683  
Old 07-06-2021, 01:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wbenson View Post
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/poli...or-general-of/

Inuit leader Mary Simon will serve as the new governor-general, becoming the first Indigenous person to be the Queen’s representative in Canada.

Ms. Simon’s background includes previously serving as president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Canada’s national Inuit organization. She is known as an advocate of Inuit rights.

https://www.royal.uk/announcement-ne...neral-canada-0

The Queen, on the recommendation of the Prime Minister of Canada, has been pleased to approve the appointment of Ms. Mary Simon as the next Governor General of Canada.

Ms. Simon is the 13th Governor General of Canada to be appointed during Her Majesty’s 69 year reign.

I hope she has a good understanding of the role of the Crown in the constitution of Canada, which is the most important prerequisite for a Governor General.


PS: It is unfortunate that Ms. Simon does not speak French fluently, but it is a plus that she has a diplomatic background.
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  #684  
Old 07-27-2021, 01:27 PM
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Installation ceremony of the new Governor General and Commander in Chief in and over Canada with the reading of the Governor General's Royal Commission and the administration of the vice-regal oaths.


https://youtu.be/pdMXxF8p4ag?t=2619
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  #685  
Old 08-15-2021, 04:22 PM
Aristocracy
 
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The GG has dissolved Parliament and called a snap federal election, at Trudeau's request.

https://www.reuters.com/world/americ...on-2021-08-15/
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  #686  
Old 08-15-2021, 05:13 PM
Majesty
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kronprinz View Post
The GG has dissolved Parliament and called a snap federal election, at Trudeau's request.

https://www.reuters.com/world/americ...on-2021-08-15/

Interesting news. Although he can do it under the constitution, is Trudeau abusing the royal prerogative to ask for an election when he thinks the polls will favor him and his party? And especially with a newly sworn-in Governor General whom he himself has nominated and who has ties to previous Liberal governments?

Considering that a new Covid wave is also probably around the corner with the delta variant, I also wonder if the time is right for a national election. I wonder what the Canadian posters think.
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  #687  
Old 08-15-2021, 06:25 PM
Aristocracy
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
Interesting news. Although he can do it under the constitution, is Trudeau abusing the royal prerogative to ask for an election when he thinks the polls will favor him and his party? And especially with a newly sworn-in Governor General whom he himself has nominated and who has ties to previous Liberal governments?

Considering that a new Covid wave is also probably around the corner with the delta variant, I also wonder if the time is right for a national election. I wonder what the Canadian posters think.
I wonder the same thing. I suppose a snap election is something I see as a way out of a political crisis but there isn't any as far as I know.

Of course Trudeau currently has a 'hung' Parliament and is probably seeking to get a clear majority in the House of Commons. Let's hope it doesn't backfire.
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  #688  
Old 08-16-2021, 06:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
Interesting news. Although he can do it under the constitution, is Trudeau abusing the royal prerogative to ask for an election when he thinks the polls will favor him and his party?
Barring the Fixed-Term Parliament Act of 2011, the UK has long had a tradition of PMs choosing when to have the election. Tone Blair called elections early in 2001 and 2005 to suit him politically. Theresa May (2017) and Boris (2019) had a similar idea, but because of the Fixed-Term Parliament Act of 2011, had to obtain the consent of Parliament to hold early elections.
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  #689  
Old 08-16-2021, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by muriel View Post
Barring the Fixed-Term Parliament Act of 2011, the UK has long had a tradition of PMs choosing when to have the election. Tone Blair called elections early in 2001 and 2005 to suit him politically. Theresa May (2017) and Boris (2019) had a similar idea, but because of the Fixed-Term Parliament Act of 2011, had to obtain the consent of Parliament to hold early elections.



In 2006, when Stephen Harper was Prime Minister of Canada, he passed a law that set a default date for Canadian federal elections (the third Monday in October in the fourth calendar year after the previous poll). However, unlike the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act in the UK, the Canadian act did not revoke the royal prerogative to dissolve Parliament and call a general election (revoking the prerogative, I think, would require a constitutional amendment under the highly qualified procedure set out in the Constitution Act, 1982, since it would affect the powers of the office of the Governor General).



At the time when the Canadian fixed-date elections act was passed, the understanding was that extraordinary elections should happen exceptionally and that the prerogative power should be used only in the event of a vote of no confidence or a similar political crisis. However, Stephen Harper himself was the first to ignore the fixed date provision when he called a snap election in 2008. And, now again, Trudeau has proven that Canadian prime ministers have no intention to commit to fixed-term parliaments.


By the way, even in the UK, the Conservative manifesto in the last election called for the FTPA to be repealed and I believe that promise was mentioned explicitly in the last Queen's speech, so I think it is safe to assume the royal prerogative power of dissolution will be restored soon in the UK as well.
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  #690  
Old 08-16-2021, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
By the way, even in the UK, the Conservative manifesto in the last election called for the FTPA to be repealed and I believe that promise was mentioned explicitly in the last Queen's speech, so I think it is safe to assume the royal prerogative power of dissolution will be restored soon in the UK as well.
That is correct.
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  #691  
Old 08-19-2021, 08:31 AM
Majesty
 
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In case you are interested, please find a below a link to the recent royal proclamation dissolving the Parliament of Canada.


https://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2...-tr60-eng.html

There are two things in particular that catch my attention in the document:

  1. The dissolution proclamation is technically a proclamation by the Queen, but it is issued and signed on her behalf by the Governor General.
  2. The proclamation explicitly mentions that the dissolution is "by and with the advice of Our Prime Minister of Canada".
The website of the Governor General actually has a detailed description of the procedure for dissolution, which can be read in the next link below.


https://www.gg.ca/en/procedures-diss...lling-election

As you can see, there are actually three royal proclamations involved in the process: the dissolution proclamation properly; a proclamation declaring that election writs are to be issued; and a proclamation summoning the new Parliament. They are all signed by the GG in the name of the Queen and also signed by the deputy attorney general and the deputy registrar general prior to being submitted to the GG. The actual polling day and the date of return of writs are set by the Governor General in Council.

I did some research and found out that the power of dissolution is mentioned only briefly in Art.50 of the Constitution Act, 1867, as follows


Quote:
50. Every House of Commons shall continue for Five Years from the Day of the Return of the Writs for choosing the House (subject to be sooner dissolved by the Governor General), and no longer.
More significantly, King George VI's Letters Patent of 1947 constituting the office of Governor General of Canada spell out more clearly the powers of the GG in that respect. Specifically, Art. VI of the said LPs states that


Quote:
VI. And We do further authorize and empower Our Governor General to exercise all powers lawfully belonging to Us in respect of summoning, proroguing or dissolving the Parliament of Canada.
EDIT: Another interesting point is that the Queen is referred to in the preamble to the dissolution proclamation by her Canadian royal titles and styles, underscoring that this is a proclamation by Elizabeth II as "Queen of Canada".
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  #692  
Old 08-19-2021, 10:53 AM
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To me the British system - that apparently is also applied in Canada - to just call general elections when you think you are most popular or might secure a larger share of parliament is really weird. I'd think there should be a better reason for such a costly operation that makes elections a toy of the prime minister instead of a crucial aspect of a good functioning democracy.

And the poor queen can do nothing but go along with these frivolous requests (that she by now surely is used to).
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  #693  
Old 08-19-2021, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebody View Post
To me the British system - that apparently is also applied in Canada - to just call general elections when you think you are most popular or might secure a larger share of parliament is really weird. I'd think there should be a better reason for such a costly operation that makes elections a toy of the prime minister instead of a crucial aspect of a good functioning democracy.



In theory, the same system also applies in the Netherlands under Art.64 of the constitution.


Quote:

Article 64 [Dissolution]
(1) Each of the Chambers may be dissolved by Royal Decree.
(2) A decree for dissolution also requires new elections to be held for the Chamber which has been dissolved and the newly elected Chamber to meet within three months.
[....]
Note that, unlike the constitution of Belgium or indeed the FTPA in the UK, the constitution of the Netherlands does not limit the possibility of dissolution to a situation where Parliament withdraws confidence from the government and simultaneously fails to appoint a new Prime Minister. In fact, votes of no confidence are not even explicitly mentioned in the (somewjat outdated) constitution of the Netherlands.

Therefore, the power to dissolve the Dutch parliament by royal decree appears to be as discretionary and unlimited as the power to do so in Canada by royal proclamation. The main difference perhaps is that Dutch politicians don't seem to use that power "frivilously", not least because, in my opinion, it would be ineffective as, under proportional representation, the outcome of elections and the future composition of the government are far more uncertain.

To be fair, Canadian PMs do not normally resort to early elections either when they have majority governments (it wouldn't be worth the risk), but, in this case, Trudeau has a minority government.
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  #694  
Old 08-20-2021, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
In case you are interested, please find a below a link to the recent royal proclamation dissolving the Parliament of Canada.

https://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2...-tr60-eng.html
Thank you for the link.

The language is very formal - the GG is "Our Right Trusty and Well-beloved" & senators are "Our beloved and faithful Senators".

Th Commons are clearly just the hoi polloi.

Without looking, it mirrors language used in the UK parliamentary system I would presume.
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  #695  
Old 08-20-2021, 12:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebody View Post
To me the British system - that apparently is also applied in Canada - to just call general elections when you think you are most popular or might secure a larger share of parliament is really weird. I'd think there should be a better reason for such a costly operation that makes elections a toy of the prime minister instead of a crucial aspect of a good functioning democracy.

And the poor queen can do nothing but go along with these frivolous requests (that she by now surely is used to).
Not all PM's get it right of course - Teresa May misjudged things very badly in 2017 & lost her majority.

A two thirds commons majority was needed to call that election but it looks like the 2011 Fixed-term Parliaments Act will be repealed by this government.
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  #696  
Old 08-21-2021, 12:05 AM
Majesty
 
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In Australia we have a Federal system. Our Federal (Australian) Government has three year terms which are not fixed, see below, thanks to our Founding Fathers.

‘The Constitution provides that terms for the House of Representatives continue for a maximum of three years from the first meeting of the House subsequent to an election. The House may also be dissolved sooner than the three-year term by the Governor General. 1 This means that a Federal Election for the House of Representatives may be called at any time in the three-year period following the first sitting of the House.’

On the other hand all our States and Territories within the Commonwealth of Australia have four year terms which are fixed, a more recent move. Work that one out!
The Governor General dissolves our Parliament and our State Governors do the same for the State assemblies when asked by the Premiers of the States involved.
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  #697  
Old 08-21-2021, 10:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbruno View Post
Interesting news. Although he can do it under the constitution, is Trudeau abusing the royal prerogative to ask for an election when he thinks the polls will favor him and his party? And especially with a newly sworn-in Governor General whom he himself has nominated and who has ties to previous Liberal governments?

Considering that a new Covid wave is also probably around the corner with the delta variant, I also wonder if the time is right for a national election. I wonder what the Canadian posters think.
To answer the question (as a Canadian), there's a window in which elections can be called. Parliaments can last up to 5 yrs although with a minority government, the government can fall at any time, if enough members of the opposition parties vote for a nonconfidence motion. The present govt is a minority govt, typically they last about 3 yrs. They were elected in 2019, so it's lifespan is typical of minority government. Our governments always try to do it when the polls are favourable.

Mbruno is correct about the fixed election date not being a requirement, one Prime Minister Harper himself chose to ignore even though he introduced the legislation. When it was taken to court, the court found that the fixed election dates were not binding on the prime minister or legally enforceable by the courts.

No Governor General in my lifetime (I'm 65) has ever refused a request. It has only happened once in our 154 years in 1926, the King-Byng affair in 1926 and led to an Imperial conference and the Statue of Westminister. It is highly unlikely a Governor General would refuse this request for fear of causing a constitutional crisis. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King%E2%80%93Byng_affair

So no, he's not abusing a royal prerogative, just trying to time the elections when the polls are favourable like all governments here do.

For your second question, yes there have been some comments/concerns about the timing during a Pandemic. However, the pandemic is not going away any time soon and various provinces have had elections since the pandemic. Elections Canada is allowing mail in voting and telling us results make take some time to get since they expect record numbers to vote by mail. I'm higher risk myself so I've registered to vote by mail. (I've worked for Elections Canada in past elections, but I'm choosing not to do so this time.)
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  #698  
Old 08-21-2021, 10:49 PM
Purrs's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Somebody View Post
To me the British system - that apparently is also applied in Canada - to just call general elections when you think you are most popular or might secure a larger share of parliament is really weird. I'd think there should be a better reason for such a costly operation that makes elections a toy of the prime minister instead of a crucial aspect of a good functioning democracy.

And the poor queen can do nothing but go along with these frivolous requests (that she by now surely is used to).
Actually it works both ways. Not just the ruling party can call an election. With a minority government, the members of the opposition parties can propose a nonconfidence motion at any time and if enough of them vote in favour, the government falls. (Typically they time this when the government is very unpopular and they think it will succeed.) Without the confidence of parliament, the Prime Minister is required to resign, Parliament is dissolved and an election is called. Some of our Prime Ministers have been defeated by non confidence motions. Governments fell due to non confidence motions in 1926, 1963, 1974, 1979, 2005, and 2011. Typically our minority governments last 3 years because they fall either due to a nonconfidence motion or more often (as in this case) the government calls an election. Majority governments run longer usually 4-5 years. (Parliament cannot go longer than 5 years.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion...fidence#Canada

IMHO, the Canadian elections are much cheaper than the US because our elections are much shorter. This present one is only 36 days from the day it was called. The American election process lasts well over a year, beginning with primaries. Our transitions to power are also short (although not as short as the UK). Our last transitoon when the government changed to a new party took 16 days whereas American ones take 72 to 78 days. This is because most of civil servants in Canada like the UK are career civil service and only the incoming ministers are chosen by the new government. In the USA, there are a massive level of political appointments.
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  #699  
Old 09-04-2021, 11:36 AM
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Early Canada election call backfires on Trudeau, who now trails in polls

Reuters

Quote:
The latest polls by Nanos, Ekos and others show Liberal fortunes have faded as voters have grown fatigued with Trudeau, 49, who has been in power since 2015. One Liberal strategist said on Friday the early-vote call had backfired as it was seen as "wrong" and "greedy" by electors.

The Nanos Research survey for CTV put the Conservatives on 35.7% public support, with the Liberals on 30.7% and the smaller left-leaning New Democrats on 18.3%. An Ekos poll published late Thursday puts the Conservatives at 35.5% versus 30.7% for the Liberals.
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  #700  
Old 09-04-2021, 01:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kronprinz View Post
Early Canada election call backfires on Trudeau, who now trails in polls

Reuters

There are still a little over two weeks of campaign left, so let us not jump into conclusions yet.


If the Conservatives win, they will still probably form a minority government, so it is not guaranteed to last long either.
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