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  #501  
Old 06-05-2016, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Rudolph View Post

7 in 10 Canadians still support ties to the monarchy.

And fifty-seven per cent of those surveyed believe the Queenís position as head of state has had a positive impact on Canadaís standing in the world.
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  #502  
Old 06-21-2016, 03:19 PM
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Why it's time to define the Crown's role with First Nations
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  #503  
Old 06-21-2016, 03:32 PM
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That's interesting! So the rights and status of the Canadian indigenous people are guaranteed (in contrast to being defined) by the crown and not the Canadian legislation?
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  #504  
Old 06-21-2016, 04:12 PM
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That's interesting! So the rights and status of the Canadian indigenous people are guaranteed (in contrast to being defined) by the crown and not the Canadian legislation?
It seems that's what it's saying.
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  #505  
Old 06-21-2016, 04:43 PM
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Odd.
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  #506  
Old 06-24-2016, 09:12 PM
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The relationship between the aboriginal people and the government seems, at least to me, to be highly politicized--with mistrust on both sides. The relationship between them and the Queen seems to be an affectionate one, from what I've seen; and there also seems to be a greater acknowledgement of the place of the Crown. Treaty Day is a really big deal.
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  #507  
Old 06-24-2016, 09:40 PM
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Basically the treaties were written before Canadian independence. So the treaties with the indigenous population were formed between the Crown and the tribes, not the Canadian government. Simply because there was no government as it stands with our own legislature an constitution, at the time. Which makes making any real changes hard, for its not a simple matter of a petition for change to the Canadian parliament. Any changes to such treaties fall to the queen, not to our government. John A MacDonald did attempt to change that but never succeeded.

The issue seems to be that not enough importance has been placed on the queen's role with the indigenous populations. The want her role as their political leader more defined, so it can gain more attention. They hope if the queen and her representatives pay more attention, changes can be made.
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  #508  
Old 06-24-2016, 11:46 PM
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The Queen and Canada: Residences, Governor General, etc...

This article is hugely biased, misleading, and not altogether accurate.

Statements like "MichaŽlle Jean, in her role as governor general, was the first to witness survivor accounts of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. David Johnston was one of the last" imply things that aren't true. You read that and think there have been a long line of Governor Generals, starting with Michešlle Jean and continuing on to the present (with Johnston falling somewhere near the present), witnessing this commission. Except their hasn't; Johnston is the current GG, and Jean is his immediate predecessor.

Aboriginal affairs falls under federal jurisdiction, and the federal government acts on behalf of the Crown in all matters relating to Aboriginals in Canada - just like they act on behalf of the Crown on all matters relating to national defence, or currency, or any other federal matter. The Queen or GG has the same responsibilities here that they have to any other federal matter.

Treaties in Canada were signed before confederation by various officials depending on the territory/who was in charge (i.e. in BC, the Douglas treaties were signed by James Douglas, then Governor of the Colony of Victoria). Shortly after Confederation, the federal government signed the Numbered treaties (11 between 1871 and 1921), then halted the treaty process (because of purely racist reasoning), with a focus on eradication of Canada's Aboriginal population, until the 1970s, when the federal government began what is a rather painstaking slow modern treaty process that attempts to actually bridge some reconciliation between Canada and the Aboriginals. One of the major modern treaties, the Nisga'a Final Agreement, was signed in 1998 by several important Nisga'a leaders, the then-Premier of BC, and the then Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development - not the Lieutenant Governor of BC, or the Governor General of Canada, or the Queen.
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  #509  
Old 06-25-2016, 12:43 AM
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I see, so the events (or lack of them) between 1921 and the 70's explain the indigenous feeling of - shall we say - adherence to the GC and QEII rather than the Canadian government?
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  #510  
Old 06-25-2016, 02:37 AM
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Perhaps it's time for the younger members of the royal family to get more involved with the indigenous people and their affairs.
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  #511  
Old 06-25-2016, 02:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Dman View Post
Perhaps it's time for the younger members of the royal family to get more involved with the indigenous people and their affairs.
If I remember right, when Will and Kate toured Canada not long after their wedding, there were several occasions where they met with and interacted with the indigenous people of various areas. Getting more involved with their affairs I think would be deemed too political and best left to the government and the politicians.
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  #512  
Old 06-25-2016, 01:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Dman View Post
Perhaps it's time for the younger members of the royal family to get more involved with the indigenous people and their affairs.
I might be on board with this if the younger members of the royal family had anything to do with Canada as a whole. But they don't, not really. William has made 1 trip to Canada in the last 16 years, and stayed for a week. Harry's been 3 times, but the first two were for military training, and the last 1 he stayed for a day.

I am a Canadian monarchist and yet I still would feel like William, Kate, and Harry were foreigners trying to interfere in Canadian politics if they got involved in this issue at this point. They have to actually build a relationship with Canada before they can get involved with an issue like this.

The Governor General of Canada can, and I have rather mixed feelings about how David Johnston has done so - although, I'm self aware enough to realize that I'm biased here, as I'm a fan of MichaŽlle Jean's, and she was noted for her attention to Canada's Aboriginals. Johnston has been faced with a few tricky situations that he's handled a bit awkwardly, notably the Idle No More movement. I think a big part of the difference between how he handles Aboriginal issues and how Jean handled them is owing to the fact that he is an older, white male born in Canada appointed to his position under a Conservative government, while Jean is a younger, black woman who came to Canada as a refugee and was appointed to her position under a Liberal government. It'll be interesting to see who is chosen to replace Johnston, although I believe he's expected to remain in position until September 2017.
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  #513  
Old 06-25-2016, 01:36 PM
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It would be nice if the younger royals developed a better relationship with Canada. The royals that seem to visit Canada much more often in the Wessex's and Princess Anne.

I'm just saying if the Indigenous people wanted a more defined role with the crown, it would be nice of the new generation of royals played small part in this.
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  #514  
Old 06-25-2016, 01:40 PM
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I don't want any royal, other than our head of state, to get involved with Canadian internal affairs, including aboriginal issues.

Anyway they need to be invited to Canada by the government, as Heritage Canada picks up the tab.
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  #515  
Old 06-25-2016, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Rudolph View Post
I don't want any royal, other than our head of state, to get involved with Canadian internal affairs, including aboriginal issues.

Anyway they need to be invited to Canada by the government, as Heritage Canada picks up the tab.
Isn't the aborigines saying they want to work The Queen and not government?
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  #516  
Old 06-25-2016, 01:50 PM
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I agree with Rudolph. The whole point of the Crown is that it stands for all the people of Canada, in the same way that the national flag stands for all the people of the United States of America. Once the Queen or other members of the Royal Family get politically involved, that's the end of the Crown's neutrality.
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  #517  
Old 06-25-2016, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
I see, so the events (or lack of them) between 1921 and the 70's explain the indigenous feeling of - shall we say - adherence to the GC and QEII rather than the Canadian government?
Um... this is going to sound a bit jaded, but I actually think the adherence to the GG and QEII is more to do with forcing the Canadian government and public to acknowledge the situation. It's such a tricky situation that Canada is very good at ignoring - we like to think that don't have the race problems seen in the US because we don't have black men being shot by the police appearing on the news with any regularity... we completely ignore the unreported issues the Aboriginal population faces, or the lasting legacy of colonialism in Canada. Doing things like protesting outside of Rideau Hall forces the press to report it and the public to acknowledge it - which in turn puts pressure on the government to address it.

The Numbered Treaties signed by the Government of Canada actually covered most of the before then un-treatied Canada - a map here shows the historic treaties between the British/Canadian governments and Aboriginals in Canada. Newfoundland wasn't a part of Canada in 1921. Quebec didn't have treaties under a British or Canadian government. The white space in Northern Canada is owing to the fact that there was little settlement in those areas (European settlement and resource grabs were a big motivation for the Numbered treaties), and the white space in BC is owing... well to pure racism and a refusal on the part of the British Columbian governments to negotiate.

In addition to this, it seems to me that as the Numbered treaties were done at a time when Canadian racism and segregation was at its worst. They were signed with the idea of taking the land away from the Aboriginal populations, forcing them into reserves and taking their children away to send them to residential schools. By the 60s/70s, though things were changing - I think one of the legacies of the American Civil Rights movement was that in Canada the Quebecois and Aboriginals were able to embark on their own rights movements. The post 1970s gains the Aboriginals have had have been because of determination on the Aboriginals' parts and a slow and gradual recognition on the part of the general public and government that the past treatment of Aboriginals has been wrong.

In the 1960s Quebec began looking into its hydroelectric resources, and in 1971 the Quebec Association of Indians sued the government for doing so without consulting them and won - forcing the government to negotiate an agreement with the Aboriginals before they were allowed to proceed with any hydroelectric development. That kind of set things off; even though part of the ruling was overturned, it was still established by the Courts that there was a legal requirement that Quebec negotiate treaties with its Aboriginal populations. The treaty was signed fast too - the first agreement was signed in 1974, the final one in 1978.

Similar cases were being held elsewhere - in BC, the Nisga'a sued the government in 1968 on the issue, and in 1973 the Supreme Court of Canada ruled at least partially in the Nisga'a's favour. The federal government of Canada began negotiating with the Nisga'a in 1976, but the provincial government of BC didn't enter into the negotiations until 1990, and the agreement wasn't signed until 1998.

A map here shows the modern treaties. A big difference in how they get handled is I think owing to what the provincial government is getting out of it - in Quebec, the government needed to sign a treaty fast because of the James Bay Hydroelectric Project. In BC, the government didn't have anything going on in the Nass River Valley, so they didn't have any motive to resolve things quickly (or even come to the table). The Northern treaties are done somewhat easier owing to the fact that there aren't any provincial governments to deal with (and considerably smaller non-Native populations).
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  #518  
Old 06-25-2016, 02:59 PM
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Thank you, Ish, for your very informative and detailed reply.

So to sum up, the Canadian governments didn't begin to address the issues with indigenous people until more or less forced to? And until the current government only pretty reluctantly.

That certainly explains why the indigenous people address the GC and the BRF - there are/were no one else, apparently.

I read this chilling article in the Guardian about murders, killings and presumed killing as well as missing of some 1.200 (perhaps 4.000!) indigenous women, which seems to have been largely ignored: https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ld-number-4000

What's the latest on that?
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  #519  
Old 06-25-2016, 03:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dman View Post
It would be nice if the younger royals developed a better relationship with Canada. The royals that seem to visit Canada much more often in the Wessex's and Princess Anne.

I'm just saying if the Indigenous people wanted a more defined role with the crown, it would be nice of the new generation of royals played small part in this.
I'm not going to disagree with the idea that it would be nice for the younger royals to develop a better relationship with Canada. Personally, I think this is something that the younger generation fails at with all the Commonwealth Realms. But some of that is owing to the Realms themselves - members of the BRF only go go the Realms at invitation (and expense) of the Realms themselves.

It is not the role of people who do not live in Canada, who do not have any real relationship with Canada, and who do not know anything about the history of Canada's Aboriginals to solve the issue. And that's not what the Aboriginals are trying to get - asking the GG to go to the Queen is a publicity stunt intended to draw public recognition to what the greater message is, not an actual appeal to the Queen. The Queen doesn't have the power to fix the problems, and the Aboriginals know it.

I do think there is likely a bit of a commentary on David Johnston at play as well. MichaŽlle Jean was known for her attention to the Aboriginals of Canada, Johnston is not. In fact, Johnston has deliberately chosen not to participate in talks between Aboriginals and the Government of Canada, while not finding a way to ease the situation, because he felt that doing so was too political.
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  #520  
Old 06-25-2016, 04:01 PM
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The Queen and Canada: Residences, Governor General, etc...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muhler View Post
Thank you, Ish, for your very informative and detailed reply.

So to sum up, the Canadian governments didn't begin to address the issues with indigenous people until more or less forced to? And until the current government only pretty reluctantly.

That certainly explains why the indigenous people address the GC and the BRF - there are/were no one else, apparently.

I read this chilling article in the Guardian about murders, killings and presumed killing as well as missing of some 1.200 (perhaps 4.000!) indigenous women, which seems to have been largely ignored: https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ld-number-4000

What's the latest on that?
Different governments have addressed it differently - but yes, turning a blind eye has been a big, reoccurring theme. I do think one of the bigger problems is the provincial governments - Aboriginal affairs are a federal issue, so the federal government is always having to deal with the issues to some extent or another, but the provincial governments can get away with turning a blind eye while still being necessary in addressing the issues.

The thing with the missing women is that Aboriginal women make up a disproportionate number of homicide victims - so something like 10% of female homicide victims are Aboriginal women, but only 3% of the population of Canadian women are Aboriginal. There's an ever bigger portion of missing women who are Aboriginal -in Saskatchewan, I think it's something like 60% of missing women are Aboriginal.

There were a lot of demands leading up to the election last year to undertake an official inquiry on the issue that were dismissed by the then Conservative government. One of promises made by Justin Trudeau and the Liberals during the election was that an official inquiry would take place, and the first phase of that was launched in December.

There is evidence that there have been/are serial killers in Canada who target women people don't care about - prostitutes, drug addicts, homeless, runaways, etc, which are disporportionally Aboriginal. So, for example there are the Highway of Tears murders in which an acknowledged 19 women have been murdered (with Aboriginals estimating more than 40 victims). 10 out of 19 of the acknowledged victims were Aboriginal. Bobby Jack Fowler was linked to 3 of the murders, possibly up to 20, and was only caught after killing women in Oregon (he never faced formal charges for the women he's accused of killing in Canada). Another man, Cody Legebokoff, was found guilty of killing 1 of the victims and another 3 victims. Unrelated to the Highway of Tears, Robert Pickton has been found guilty of killing 6 women, linked to the deaths of another 20 women, had the remains of more than 30 women found on his property, and is believed to have actually killed closer to 50 women. His victims were primarily prostitutes taken from the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, and about half of them were Aboriginal women. But they weren't women the public cared about, so the police didn't prioritize the investigation.
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