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-   -   Is Rania Popular in Jordan? (http://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/f103/is-rania-popular-in-jordan-7889.html)

grecka 11-11-2005 02:17 AM

Is Rania Popular in Jordan?
 
I've always been kind of curious as to how the Jordanian people view Rania. I've read in a variety of articles that she is resented by some for her love of haute couture and her shunning of the hijab. Is this true?

HMQueenElizabethII 11-11-2005 04:27 AM

I think Queen Rania would be famous in Jordan and for the Jordanian people, by her involment in charities, and care for people,...and i have a Jordania friend in Australia, though he was born here but he knows lots of Queen Rania and he said that Queen Rania is a really wonderful lady as well.

rubah 11-11-2005 10:51 AM

I am a Jordanien and i assure you that most people here adore her.

maryshawn 11-11-2005 09:46 PM

If there was ever a question, I think we have our answer about Queen Rania and King Abdullah's popularity in their country in the rallies of support shown since the attacks. It is clear to me they have the love and support and admiration of the people of Jordan.

sommone 11-11-2005 11:53 PM

I think Rania has and will have her critics...I remember reading about an incident where Prince Ali was at a game, and some of the men were chanting something to the effect, and this isn't verbatim, of Abdullah leaving Rania and getting a Jordanian wife. He called Abdullah on the phone to let him hear the group of men chanting the insult. I think though that for the most part she is liked in Jordan.

Alexandria 11-12-2005 12:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sommone
I think Rania has and will have her critics...

I think that is true of every public figure and Rania is no different. Some will like her simply because she is the queen and some will like her because of her work. Others will dislike her because of her work (or lack of it or choices of it) or just because she is queen or because there is a preference for a previous queen or a preference for a style of a previous queen.

I think that there is also a difference between being popular and being respected. For example, I think Princess Anne of Great Britain is respected for her hard work but I don't necessarily think she's popular in the same manner Princess Diana was.

I personally do not know the situation and feelings of the Jordanian people to judge what the sentiments on Rania are but I think there are sentiments for both popularity and respect.

maryshawn 11-12-2005 12:11 AM

I hadn't heard this. QN encountered the same thing but her husband told her it would "blow over." She saw it as a catalyst to change/simplify her image and it pretty much spelled an end to her elaborate wardrobe and she admits to packing away the jewels and wearing a bracelet from her children instead.

I think you're all right about people having their supporters and detractors--it happens to all public figures. What I see right now is a woman who is doing her dignified and compassionate best to help others with her presence and personal conversations with those victimized by the terrorists. I believe it will help her image--though I know she's not concerned about that right now--and will silence the critics for awhile and perhaps win more support from people "on the fence" about her.

Tragic as it is, this may be a defining moment in the reign of KA and QR. Thus far, their performance has been flawless, in my view.

quote=sommone]I think Rania has and will have her critics...I remember reading about an incident where Prince Ali was at a game, and some of the men were chanting something to the effect, and this isn't verbatim, of Abdullah leaving Rania and getting a Jordanian wife. He called Abdullah on the phone to let him hear the group of men chanting the insult. I think though that for the most part, she is liked in Jordan.[/quote]

Alexandria 11-12-2005 12:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maryshawn

Tragic as it is, this may be a defining moment in the reign of KA and QR. Thus far, their performance has been flawless, in my view.

I've thought this, too Mary Shawn.

Sometimes it is because of such a terrible loss or immense tragedy that defines the kind of leadership a country has. It's not so much the everyday moments or policies that define leaders, but it's how they react and lead their country and their fellow citizens that makes others take note and either appreciate them or resent them.

When the terrorist attacks took place in Spain, the royal family really rose to the occasion so to speak, publicly demonstrating their sadness at the loss of hundreds of fellow citizens. We saw all the members of the royal family shed tears publicly at memorial masses and funerals, and Prince Felipe and his sisters marching in a parade against terrorists. It was, as I recall, a moment that changed many minds about Letizia. Many people hadn't warmed up to her at that point. They thought that she was cold and stiff but when those pictures of her stricken with grief as she visited the hospital right after the attacks or attending those services, many minds were changed.

I think the same is happening now in Jordan. Before Wednesday, most of what I read was about Rania's physical appearance and her designer clothing. Very little was said about the good work she did. But these last two days I have not read a single sentence about Rania showing up at a hospital wearing Prada or Gucci, rather about how emotionally stricken and affected she has been, how she wiped tears away and consoled her fellow citizens, how she has held babies and hands of men and women young and old.

It's sad that such a loss had to have taken place for people to see and recognize the kind of work Rania has done all along and for that work to define her rather than her clothes defining her.

grevinnan 11-12-2005 12:38 AM

If one does not want to be defined by ones designer clothing - don't wear it. We all determine what the first and subsequent impression of us should be - if one chooses expensive clothing that stands out then that is the picture we leave of ourselves for other people to remember us by.

Humera 11-12-2005 01:21 AM

I dont agree. All royals wear designer clothing. Yet is that all thats worth talking about? I dont want anyone to define me or form a judgement about me based on what I do or do not wear, nor does Rania, I am sure.
If people willingly choose to only emphasize that aspect of Rania's personality then thats a poor reflection of their mind-set. In my opinion it does not diminish any of the good work that she or any other royal does. Why should she stop wearing designer clothes because some people only focus on the superficial?
Besides, not everyone thinks that way. One only has to take a look at the KA and QR thread and see how many people have appreciated the way QR has handled herself, not only since the terrorist attacks but before that, when she visited the earthquake victims in Pakistan, the way she spent much of her Ramadan visiting orphans and widows, and thats just during the last few weeks.
Clearly, her designer clothes weren't getting in the way of her performing her duties nor did most of us find them so distracting that we couldn't focus on the good she was doing.

sommone 11-12-2005 01:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alexandria
It's sad that such a loss had to have taken place for people to see and recognize the kind of work Rania has done all along and for that work to define her rather than her clothes defining her.


I agree Alexandria...She's been doing this same work all along, but people just get too caught up in what she's wearing, and that is as far as it goes for some. Like I said in another post, the evidence of her work is available for the public to read about on the internet, or even in one of her other threads.:cool:

grevinnan 11-12-2005 04:30 PM

I have no doubt you are correct in stating that Queen Raina is very active in various causes in her country. However, in the press she mostly looks like she just stepped of a runway in Paris. She is also very beautiful and photogenic. Most of us will not start to do research on beautiful people we come across in the news. Therefore, the impression most people will have of her is her looks. My point was and remains - if she wants to be noted for her work she may need to downplay her appearance, especially when she is engaged in activities related to her causes. There are many opportunities for royals to be dressed for show. Most royals are very well dressed but the clothes do not take centerstage.

polop 11-12-2005 04:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ~*~Humera~*~
I dont agree. All royals wear designer clothing. Yet is that all thats worth talking about? I dont want anyone to define me or form a judgement about me based on what I do or do not wear, nor does Rania, I am sure.
If people willingly choose to only emphasize that aspect of Rania's personality then thats a poor reflection of their mind-set. In my opinion it does not diminish any of the good work that she or any other royal does. Why should she stop wearing designer clothes because some people only focus on the superficial?
Besides, not everyone thinks that way. One only has to take a look at the KA and QR thread and see how many people have appreciated the way QR has handled herself, not only since the terrorist attacks but before that, when she visited the earthquake victims in Pakistan, the way she spent much of her Ramadan visiting orphans and widows, and thats just during the last few weeks.
Clearly, her designer clothes weren't getting in the way of her performing her duties nor did most of us find them so distracting that we couldn't focus on the good she was doing.

You're right Humera, nobody wants to be judged by the clothes they wear, but the truth is, clothes do define a person.In most societies of the world, clothes are a reflection of oneself.I understand your point and see where the notion such as, "well she has a million dollars why shouldn't be allowed to spend it?"The fact is, there is a time and a place for everything.Personally, I don't agree with Rania's choice of clothing.There are times when there is no need for her to carry a Gucci bag and wear Prada shoes, but then again this is MY OPINION.;) :)

Humera 11-12-2005 04:51 PM

I dont think its fair to say she looks like she stepped off the runway most of the time. And those people who are familiar with her daily activities would strongly disagree as well. I think that sometimes a lot of people get the wrong impression by seeing only her glamorous pictures in the media or in the fashion threads. Again, i would refer you to what she has been doing over the past month in particular and this year in general.
She always choses her clothing appropriate to the event. If she is addressing a session of the WEF or the Clinton Global intiative earlier this year or any other world body, she'll wear business attire. If she is visiting victims of a disaster she'll wear black or very sombre clothes. If she's running or bicycling in a rally, she'll wear a simple t-shirt and hat and so on.
So I think that there are a lot of misperceptions out there regarding such things. As for looking good and photogenic, that is not her fault nor do I get the impression that her clothes take centerstage all the time. I dont recall anyone here talking about her clothes when she was visiting the earthquake victims in Pakistan nor recently when she's visiting the victims of the terrorist attack.
Even if her clothes are briefly mentioned in some articles in Vogue or Vanity Fair or other media, so are the more substantial things she is doing.
If people make comments sometimes about liking or disliking an outfit she's wearing at any event, like many of us do at TRF, then that is natural and true for every single royal woman wether it is CP Letizia or Mette-Marit or Mary etc.
But that's our problem, not theirs.

Humera 11-12-2005 04:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by polop
There are times when there is no need for her to carry a Gucci bag and wear Prada shoes

true. And she doesnt carry and wear them all the time.
One only needs to look at her recent pictures and relevant pictures from the past.

EmmieLou 11-12-2005 05:06 PM

I have great respect for Queen Rania, truth be told if it were not for the King and Queen of Jordan being the kind people they seem to be I would probably know nothing about Jordan or its people.

I think Rania is wonderful woman.

Humera 11-12-2005 05:25 PM

Same here EmmieLou.
As much as some people like to put her down, if it wasn't for the coverage she has received in the western media, whether for her looks, her work, or her status as a royal, I and many others I know would know nothing about Jordan or its King and Queen.

carlota 11-12-2005 05:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alexandria
I think the same is happening now in Jordan. Before Wednesday, most of what I read was about Rania's physical appearance and her designer clothing. Very little was said about the good work she did. But these last two days I have not read a single sentence about Rania showing up at a hospital wearing Prada or Gucci, rather about how emotionally stricken and affected she has been, how she wiped tears away and consoled her fellow citizens, how she has held babies and hands of men and women young and old.

i really agree alexandria. time ago the attacks, let's say 1 year ago, i used to see rania as a clotheshorse, not really involved and only caring about fashion and trends. however, some time ago, for some reason i ended up in (i think) unicef's page, where she talked about many issues and offered her image to REALLY be image of that foundation, and not just being a patron of it and not doing anything appart from attending one or two events. there it was when i saw the real rania, the one hiding above all those beautiful and lavish clothes. since that day, i started seeing how she took part really actively, as i said in other thread, in many other totally different causes and i started to admire her a lot. i sincerely don't mind the ammounts of money she spends in clothing (in which she looks always great) if she is doing such a great job. some other princesses spend the same ammounts of money and can't look as good as her, so goo for rania, for being a "queen of today", active and intelligent, and look great at the same time. bravo for her.

polop 11-12-2005 06:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ~*~Humera~*~
Same here EmmieLou.
As much as some people like to put her down, if it wasn't for the coverage she has received in the western media, whether for her looks, her work, or her status as a royal, I and many others I know would know nothing about Jordan or its King and Queen.

No offense, but that's sad.The only way she can bring attention to her country and issues that matter is by how she dresses and by her looks.Mother Tersea was not the most fashionable person on the planet, but she showed the world that you can make a difference even in the most neglected places.(She wasn't even a queen);)

madonna23 11-12-2005 06:31 PM

no offense, but those protests don't mean a thing about the jrf's popularity in jordan. i was watching cnn and they pointed out that most jordanians are not very sympathetic to the "I love Abdullah" thing going on at the protest and in all probability, those protesters aren't either.

when measuring the popularity of the jrf, it is too easy to get caught up in the pictures/articles that petra or the jordan times put up but you have to realize that all of these media outlets are controlled by the king himself!

and i hope none of you think that i'm just anti-jrf but it is a well known fact that the king weilds absolute power. there was a poll conducted by a jordanians university that found that most people are too afraid to criticize the government. and it's easy to understand why as even a verbal criticism can lead to jail, torture, etc.

so the king still weilds absolute power:


Absolute power
King Abdullah II, meanwhile, has worked hard to strengthen relations with the West and rebuild bridges with the Gulf states which were broken when his father expressed sympathy for Saddam Hussein at the time of the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990.
But the success of the king's foreign diplomacy has not always been matched by success in pursuing domestic policies.

When he succeeded King Hussein in 1999 there was a general expectation in Jordan that the young king would implement widespread political reforms.

In the event, little has happened.
King Abdullah's power remains absolute. Parliament, political parties and civil society institutions are kept at arm's length. Restrictions on media freedom are as tight as ever. A long-promised National Agenda, billed as a blueprint for long-term political, economic and social reform, still awaits publication.
(http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/mid...st/4424294.stm)

so yeah, coming back to rania, we will never know if she is popular in jordan. she is popular in the west and among jordanians maybe living in the west, but whether she or any other member of the jrf is popular in jordan, well, we will never know.


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