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Kelly B 12-02-2002 02:18 PM

King Constantine and Queen Anne-Marie 1: December 2002-April 2005
 
In Hellomagazine.com

Interesting..the Greek Govt is ordered to compensate the exiled Greek Royal Family.

29 NOVEMBER 2002
More than 25 years after the Greek monarchy was abolished, a European court has ordered the country to pay former King Constantine II and his family £8.9 million for properties seized by the government.

The ex-monarch, who holds a passport from Denmark, where his wife Anne-Marie is a princess, had claimed that Greece's ruling party unlawfully seized more than 18,000 acres of land from the family in 1994. He had asked for more than £316 million in compensation.

The European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg has now said the King must be compensated for three properties that were taken: the Mon Repos Palace on Corfu, the former royal palace at Tatoi, northwest of Athens, and thousands of acres of hunting woodland in central Greece. Mon Repos now serves as a museum and convention centre, while the palace at Tatoi, where the royal burial ground is located, has been abandoned for decades.

Former King Constantine; a cousin of the Duke of Edinburgh, godfather to Prince William and brother of Queen Sofia of Spain; was exiled from Greece in 1967 after a military coup. He now lives with his family in London.

Jacqueline 12-28-2002 01:12 AM

Hi everyone!

Here is an interesting article that was sent to me by a friend written by the infamous Taki concernig a few world issues but more importantly the compensation that he found to be a less than adequate amount given to The Royal Family of Greece.

What happened to honesty?
Taki
New York
December 14, 2002

My friend Tom Fleming, editor-in-chief of Chronicles, and a polymath who doesn’t tolerate fools or knaves, recently wrote that when he’s described as a journalist, he takes it as an insult. ‘Journalists are to writers what kept women are to wives ...’ The American version of Paul Johnson went on to say that even the old standards of mercenary journalism have collapsed. ‘Most journalists no longer even pretend to follow the news. All that matters to them is their celebrity status on TV.’ Egotism, rudeness, ignorance and total dishonesty make for a depressing spectacle, and nothing depresses more than today’s television, on both sides of the ocean. Then there’s politics, as practiced by today’s politicians. ‘He never told the truth when a lie would serve,’ was the great Douglas MacArthur’s judgment on FDR, and the same can now be applied to virtually the entire world of politics and journalism. Bill Clinton and Tony Blair are, of course, the masters of the direct lie, able to look straight into the camera and tell incredible whoppers with a sincerity that would make Mother Teresa blush.

What a depressing thought at Christmas-time. I don’t watch television except for sport and the golden oldies, but at times I happen to channel-surf and run across a comb-over clown like William Kristol —always extolling the fairness of shooting Palestinian stone-throwing teenagers with armour-piercing missiles — or a loud-mouth like Chris Matthews beating the war drum. Kristol wears make-up à la Mae West, but it does very little for him. My spies tell me he also suffers from terrible halitosis. Where do the networks find these low-lifes? Once upon a time I used to listen to the news and more or less believed the soothing voices of the speakers. No longer. Too many channels have diluted the talent, and now it’s almost freak time. A disgusting-looking man like Alan Dershowitz (O.J. Simpson’s mouthpiece and saviour) is on almost every night, discharging hot air, humbug and hyperbole, and no one as yet has taken out a fatwa against him and the clowns who invite him on the air. And speaking of the latter, I just read a marvellous book by Michael Beschloss called The Conquerors. The book is built almost entirely around the conversations of high-up American officials trying to decide what to do with Germany. Roosevelt’s close friend and secretary of the treasury Henry Morgenthau wanted revenge. He wished to see Germany, one of Europe’s greatest countries, stripped of its industries and turned into ‘something like the used-up areas of Nevada deserts where only ghost towns, rusting machinery and abandoned mines remain’. Morgenthau and his ilk were following Stalin’s demands for unconditional surrender, a catastrophic decision accepted by Churchill and Roosevelt, one that made Germans fight to the last. Millions died needlessly but, thank God, Morgenthau’s plans were not followed by Truman. When FDR warned Morgenthau that Europe might starve if it could no longer buy German-made farm machinery, Morgenthau responded, ‘So what?’.

Nice guy that Morgi sonofabitch. Almost as nice as the aforementioned Alan Dershowitz, whom the great Paul Gottfried writing in the American Conservative recently took to task: ‘Always around to enlighten us, Dershowitz explains in his autobiography Chutzpah that millions of Poles were selectively murdered but in no way should be viewed as victims of genocide.’ In other words, mostly Catholic Poles don’t have the same propagandistic value as, say, Jewish victims. And speaking of victims, is there a bigger one than King Constantine of Greece? Seventeen hypocritical lawyers posing as fair-minded people and judging King Constantine’s case against the kleptocratic Greek republic found for the King — there was no alternative, the Greek state having stolen his property — but ordered the kleptocracy to pay something less than ten cents on the dollar. If this European Court of Human Rights is an omen of things to come, I’m off to Baghdad. Eighteen thousand acres of valuable land bought by the King’s grandfather and great-grandfather with private funds, and unlawfully seized by the Greek government, are worth closer to £350 million than the lousy £9 million issued by the judges in Strasbourg. Let’s not kid ourselves.

Strasbourg judges are not going to go against Greek socialists. Both are made of the same scum. The Greeks have been maligning the King non-stop since he was the first to rise up against the military dictatorship in 1967, an act for which he lost his throne. The Greek royal family will never be forgiven for having fought the communist guerrillas and having kept Greece on the side of the West. King Constantine was born in Greece, and is as Greek as any of those crooked dwarfs now running the place. It is an outrage and a warning to any of us who might trust European justice in future. To make matters worse, the King gave the money to a Greek charity, surely to be skimmed off by the Greeks.

To all of you Spectator readers, the happiest of Christmases, and a very lousy 25 December to the Greek crooks and to the Pontius Pilates of Strasbourg.

Link: http://www.spectator.co.uk/article.php3?ta...2-12-14&id=2618

Jacqueline 01-16-2003 02:51 PM

2 Attachment(s)
King Constantine and Queen Anne-Marie

Queen Anne-Marie and King Constantine - Photo From: Polfoto

Jacqueline 02-15-2003 04:36 PM

FORMER KING OF GREECE IN ATHENS
Athens, 15 February 2003 (18:41 UTC+2)

Former King of Greece Constantinos arrived in Athens today, accompanied by his family. The deposed monarch entered Greece with a Danish passport under the name and surname Constantinos De Grecia, while he arrived at “El. Venizelos” airport on an “Alitalia” flight from Milan and was checked in Italy, in accordance with the Schengen Treaty. Immediately following his arrival he went to Tatoi, to his parents' graves where a memorial service was held. “All procedures Greece were carried out according to the Schengen Treaty, signed by Greece”, commented the Government Spokesperson.

Article From: Macedonian Press Agency

Jacqueline 02-17-2003 03:58 PM

.....As if they could have legally denied entrance to a person who holds a passport issued from a member of the EU. :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Greece says ex-King can attend Olympics but must not 'offend' democracy

Associated Press
Feb. 17, 2003 9:06 a.m.[/B
]

ATHENS, Greece (AP)
—Greece's former king Constantine will be allowed to attend the 2004 Olympics, but he should not "offend" the country's democracy, a Greek government spokesman said.
Constantine paid a surprise visit to Athens at the weekend with his Danish-born wife Anne-Marie and three of his children - his third brief appearance in Greece since fleeing the country 36 years ago.

State-run media said Constantine, a member of the International Olympic Committee, traveled on a Danish passport.

Government spokesman Tilemahos Hitiris said authorities could not stop him visiting or attending the 2004 Olympics.

"He comes with a European passport and his entrance will not be denied," Hitiris said.

But he added: "It depends on his behavior. If offends or acts illegally ... toward our democratic system, our constitution, then he certainly will not be able to come."

The former king, who lives in London, won a gold medal for Greece in sailing at the 1960 Rome Olympics but remains a broadly unpopular figure in his homeland.

He fled Greece in 1967 after swearing in and later challenging the leaders of a military dictatorship. Greeks voted to abolish the monarchy in a 1974 referendum after the dictatorship fell.

Constantine was stripped of his Greek passport in 1994 after he refused to declare a last name.

IOC members are normally granted automatic access to attend Olympics, but the government had previously cast doubt over Constantine's wish to watch the Athens' games.

Constantine had only returned briefly on two previous occasions: to attend his mother's funeral in 1981 and for a short holiday in 1993.

Article From: FoxSports.com

samitude 02-17-2003 04:09 PM

I am very happy for them! I wish that the monarchy could be restored, but if it can't then I'm glad that they are at least able to go to Greece.

samitude 02-18-2003 06:46 PM

These photos are from Corbis.

Alexandria 02-18-2003 07:37 PM

I'm surprised Princess Alexia went since she is pregnant. Is she not due soon, too?

And while I know the two younger children must be in school, I'm surprised the King and Queen wouldn't have taken them since I do not believe they have ever been. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

samitude 02-18-2003 08:04 PM

Princess Alexia's baby is due in May so she still has about three more months.

I was also surprised that the younger children didn't go, but maybe they were in school and couldn't leave.

I had heard something about Theodora going to a university in the United States, but I haven't heard anymore about it. Has anyone else?

Samantha75 02-27-2003 07:49 AM

I disagree with Jacqueline. Greece can forbid Constantine and his family to enter Greece no matter what passport they have. They can do that if a court decides that Constantine's trip can start a social and/or political unrest. Many countries have the same law.

I doubt whether Greece will go to court in order to stop him from entering the country, but governments will be watching how he and his family behave when they visit. Bear in mind that it is not just the current government which made problems for him. He was ousted from the country when the previous (conservative) government sent the air-force against him while he was cruising in the Aegean in 1993. That was the last time he was in Greece. What happened was that the then conservative government, which included some supporters of Constantine, among them the then prime minister who is a personal friend of his, made a deal with the ex king. The deal was that he would be very discreet during his visit, and certain limits were set. At the same time the same government had promised him the same settlement on the royal property that he had agreed with a previous government (back in the eighties-different government, different party). For more information about this deal you can see what he himself says on his site.

Unfortunately for him, Constantine provoked several people in Greece, the then opposition decided to exploit that in order to cause an uproar, the deal about the property was naturally off, and he was ousted from the country. Contrary to what you hear, Constantine is hugely unpopular in Greece among the population. He is very clever to blame it all on the government, rather than the Greeks, but that's tactics. The truth is that very few people like him, and nobody has protested the government's treatment of him and his family. It would be fair to say that he is even despised by many Greeks, especially his mother.

The 1993 government held elections shortly afterwards, a new party came to power, and they confiscated Constantine's property, declared him a persona non grata (this is legal, other countries have the same law), and refused to renew his passport (again, they have the right to do so under the law; the same applies in many European countries).

As for the Olympics, a special deal was made between the IOC and the Greek government about Constantine attending them.

The above are 100% factually correct. I am not stating my opinion, just facts.

Samantha

Alexandria 02-27-2003 10:03 AM

I was just curious about the results of the Greek royal family's visit to Greece. What else did the family do while they were there? It seems that there was some attention paid to the return but not much coverage afterwards. I tried to do some searches but couldn't come up with any stories or photos. Is anyone else better in the know than I am?

Jacqueline 02-27-2003 11:20 AM

I seriously doubt that The Royal Family of Greece is a group of brutes who will "behave badly" when they visit Greece. They are hardly an uncivilized family and I doubt that any member of the family is going to start a movement. Yes, Greece can forbid any member of the GRF entrance, but they would certainly have hell to pay for it when denying entrance to ANY individual with a European Union passport. Regardless of the facts that you state Samantha, it would be an issue to say the least (and King Constantine loves issues). Sure, Greece has their laws-all countries do (thanks for the clarification) :rolleyes: .

Greece is not stronger nor bigger than the EU, no matter what some people would like to think. I think that the Greek goverment has simply been showing their weakness and fear of King Constantine. The fact that such a major issue is always made out of his visits to Greece are a testament to the fact that of course he is hugely popular there and that there is much to be feared by him. Governments usually don't fear the entrance of individuals who are hopeless, weak, and who pose no threat. If any problems are caused by his visit ever I doubt that the GRF itself would be to blame. That blame would fall on the individuals who support the GRF and King Constantine. King Constantine cannot be said to be "provoking" anyone. People have a right to feel the way in which they choose. I thought that Greece was a republic, not a dictatorship? I guesst that this fact still remains to be determined. :angry: :rolleyes: Perhaps Greece should take issue with their citizens who feel that King Constantine is their rightful sovereign-that is of course unless individuals in Greece are not allowed to show dislike to their current form of government or express any opposing opinions. King Constantine cannot control how individuals feel about him. He would be ridiculously stupid to say to people: Oh no! Don't support me. I was forced into exile, so please support your current form of goverment and political and social leaders regardless of how you really feel about things. Don't ever have your own opinion. It does sound stupid doesn't it?

I do not think that "provoking" people in Greece as you put it Samantha is a negative thing at all where King Constantine is concerned. It think that its wonderful that his mere presence always sparks such debate. Really, what is there to fear if King Constantine and the GRF are so weakened and have absolutey no power or support in Greece? It must be lovely to have that kind of effect on people. The GRF may never return to Greece, but it is more than obvious that it will be a very long time before they are forgotten.....ever.

I simply love all of these deals that have to be made...all the limits that have to be set. It seems to me that the Greek governement simply isn't very confident in its current state. If it were, then how could a deposed monarch, be such a threat...a monarch who had all of his property taken, a monarch who had to flee the country immediately, a monarch who had to petiton the courts to obtain the monetary value for his family's property and still did not receive anything close to adequate compensation (one would think that he was a weakend and pathetic man, no? :rolleyes: :rolleyes: ) etc? What could he possibly do to such a strong and effective goverment?

I think that tha entire thing is laughable. :lol: :lol: :lol: I have never really had a great interest in the restoration of former monarchies (other than studying them in an historical and political context), but I have to agree with Sylvia. It would be far too lovely to see the monarchy restored to Greece. :lol: :lol: It would be very fitting IMO. In all honesty, if it were not still possible, then the GRF and King Constantine, wouldn't have to watch Greek officials run through so many hoops every single time they wanted to make a simple visit (Does anyone of these people know how pathetic they look? :lol: :lol: :lol: ). I bet the GRF just laughs their "you know whats off" when they think about it. It's really quite entertaining. :lol: :lol: :lol: It certainly amuses me.

Samantha75 02-28-2003 06:37 AM

Jacqueline,

I have some serious ties with Greece, so I know a lot about the public opinion there. And I don't hate Constantine and his family. So, this, I hope, allows me to be objective in my assessment of the situation.

First, the EU issue: you write that "[Greece] would certainly have hell to pay for it when denying entrance to ANY individual with a European Union passport."

Yes, this will indeed be so if they just deny entrance to an EU citizen without reason. However, as I wrote before, there is a provision both in Greek law (shared by other countries as well) and in the EU regulations that allows ANY EU country to deny entrance to a citizen bearing an EU passport. That can happen if the said country can prove that the person in question can cause political and social unrest, as I wrote in my previous message. So, no hell there.

Actually, Greece and France dealt with such an issue when the extreme right-wing politician and racist Le Pen visited Greece in the mid-eighties. There were riots against him in Greece, and both countries collaborated in having him declared a persona non grata for that. So, there was no hell from France or the EU. Constantine's case was obviously different: It would have been a major issue for Greece if they had forbidden him entrance, or had said that they were thinking about forbidding him entrance.

True, Constantine and his family cannot be accused of such behavior, and this is why Greece never forbade him to visit. Where is the instability and insecurity that you argue there? However, this can, and I am sure that it will change in the future, IF Constantine behaves differently. Remember that the recent decision of the Court of Human Rights allowed Greece special provisions for the smooth transition from monarchy to a republic. I presume that you have read it, including the legal stuff behind it, since you are interested in the former RF or Greece. The confiscation of the royal property was considered a lawful move PROVIDED that there would be some (token) compensation. And this is what he got. A token compensation because the property was actually worth much more.

The issue of provocation and the former RF's behavior: we are not talking here about brutes, no problem there. It would, however, be an issue if a private individual visited and raised a claim to the throne (something that people like Symeon have not done in their respective countries). It would also be a problem if Constantine, as he did in 1993, staged certain appearances in certain regions and made certain declarations disputing the legal standing of the current political system of the country. This cost him his property, but it also goes against the Constitution of Greece. I presume that you have read that as well, so I won't repeat the relevant articles. Don't forget that Greece is a state of law, and it is recognized as such by the entire international community.

Constantine should also know that there are issues in Greece that are still very sensitive among the population, and these have to do with the behavior of his family in the past. True, he was young when he became king, true, one cannot blame him for the actions of people like Constantine I, or even his own mother Frederica, or the weakness of his otherwise popular father Paul I, but he should understand that most Greeks are still sensitive about certain things. I am sure you are familiar with these, including the illegal stripping of certain Greeks off their citizenship for their political beliefs at the instigation of the Palace. About sending Greeks to exile for their political beliefs, something that not even the USA did during its darkest hours of Macarthyism. Or the attempt against the life of the then elected prime-minister, instigated by Frederica's entourage in the 1950's which led to the downfall of the government and the said prime-minister's fleeing the country.

Constantine, it is felt in Greece, never showed good-will towards the Greek people by stating that he recognizes the referendum of 1975. Many people in Greece resent the fact that while he says that he is a private citizen he still styles himself as "king" and his daughter-in-law as "crown princess." Yes, I know all about protocoll and the such, but this is, believe me, the common sentiment in Greece, and he refuses to respect that. The same common sentiment also wants him to adopt a last name, as Symeon has done. He refuses.

To me at least it is obvious that we are dealing here with two entities, Greece on the one hand, the former RF on the other, which are on a separate wave-length and cannot come together. So, they are better off staying apart.

And, Jacqueline, believe me: Constantine IS unpopular in Greece. Hugely unpopular. If people resented the way the government treated him (and this includes all governments, also these which have included his sympathizers) they would protest. They would demonstrate. The Greeks are notorious individualists who have no problem to demonstrate and raise hell if they disagree with something. They have been on the news worldwide about demonstrations that they organized on issues they felt close to their heart. And these issues did not always have to do with foreign relations but included government policy as well. I'm afraid that Constantine is not one of these issues. Yes, there are some very few supporters of his left. Less than ten per cent of the population. However, if he does not tune himself in to the popular sentiment he will continue to have problems with Greece. And this is a pity if he really feels Greek and wants to go back.

Samantha

Jacqueline 03-02-2003 12:53 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Samantha75@Feb 28th, 2003 - 11:37 am

And, Jacqueline, believe me: Constantine IS unpopular in Greece. Hugely unpopular. If people resented the way the government treated him (and this includes all governments, also these which have included his sympathizers) they would protest. They would demonstrate. The Greeks are notorious individualists who have no problem to demonstrate and raise hell if they disagree with something. They have been on the news worldwide about demonstrations that they organized on issues they felt close to their heart. And these issues did not always have to do with foreign relations but included government policy as well. I'm afraid that Constantine is not one of these issues. Yes, there are some very few supporters of his left. Less than ten per cent of the population. However, if he does not tune himself in to the popular sentiment he will continue to have problems with Greece. And this is a pity if he really feels Greek and wants to go back.

Samantha

Well, then there shouldn't be an issue about King Constantine or any member of the GRF visiting Greece now should there :question: Whether he refers to himself as King or Emperor shouldn't really matter, now should it :question: Marie-Chantal should be allowed to refer to herself as the Queen of Whoopie if she likes and no one shoud really care about it, now should they :question: Such and unpopular group really shouldn't warrant any reaction (if any very little) and for someone who is so unpopular his visits along with those of his family should really spark little to no debate, shouldn't it :question: If anything it should cause normal curiosity (what they are doing, how everyone is looking these days, what they're wearing, etc., etc., etc......). For someone who is hugely unpopular the goverment shouldn't expect much from him, the GRF or the Greek citizens. If he is so unpopular, then who cares about him :question: One would think that such unpopularity would most likely lead to King Constantine being ignored. How can someone who is so unpopular pose such a threat :question: Who cares about such an unpopular individual :question: One would think that the presence of King Constantine along with that of any member of the GRF would cause the Greeks to have these massive demonstrations that you mentioned the Greeks being so famous for, so where are they :question: (Since everyone is so insulted) One would think that such unpopularity would render one completely powerless and that one's presence anywhere in the world (for the most part) would be no relevant than that of a wire corset.

So, in case you haven't noticed, I do not believe you and therefore, certainly will not take your word for it.

This had the potential to be an extremely interesting discussion, but now I see that you are simlpy arguing for the sake of argument. I see no constant coherence in your statements, only an attempt to be contrary and cause chaos and with this in my mind, I must say that I have grown extremely bored of this "discussion."

thissal 03-03-2003 12:56 PM

This has been an entertaining subject, don't quit. It seems so many have a need for monarchies. They provide some kind of emotional anchor as well as great entertainment and tourist business. :D Look at the poor USA, always trying to find some poor substitute for royalty. ;) The current Greek government probably recognizes this general need for some kind of monarchy. If King Constantine has not done anything totally despicable, then why not restore him to his throne? What would be the harm in it?

Another advantage to a monarchy, and I think they should be with little actual political power, is that they can provide a moderating influence on actions of the government. Anything that disperses or moderates centralized political power is a good thing.

Julia 03-03-2003 01:32 PM

Hi Samantha.

Are there links on the web that provide detailed information on what you have stated above? Would just like to read up.

Thanks!
Julia

Samantha75 03-04-2003 04:19 AM

There are various things you can consult on the topic. To begin with details of Constantine's 1993 visit to Greece are available both on his official site and in the text that his lawyers submitted to the Court of Human Rights. These details have never been disputed by the Greek government. Details of the deal he struck with both the Papandreou government in 1988 and with the Mitsotakis government in 1992 regarding the settlement of the royal property are also available in the above site. These facts are not disputed by the Greeks either. The Court of Human Rights also has a site posting with the claims of both sides. Details on the unofficial deal that was struck between Mitsotakis (prime-minister in 1993 and personal friend of Constantine) regarding the former king's visit are available in the Greek press, and they have never been disputed by Constantine himself as you can see from whatever texts he has posted online.

Archival material on the affairs of Greece in the fifties and sixties and the role of the monarchy has been made available in Greece, but most importantly in the United States National Archives and in Britain. Several reputed historians have been using them to write books. Of particular interest are also the memoirs of Allan Dulles, former Chief of the CIA (who also cites other people) on the role of Frederica in the Greek internal affairs and foreign relations at the same time. Lots of American historians, including Howard Jones, have dealt with that very turbulent period in Greece.

You will notice that I chose not to cite Greek historiographical sources in detail but rather opted for outsiders' views whose objectivity, I hope, cannot be easily questioned.

Also: hints at the unpopularity of Frederica and allegations that she involved herself in Greek politics are also included in the official biography of Queen Sofia of Spain. Obviously, the journalist in question does not state that Frederica involved herself in politics, but she quotes Queen Sofia with her permission on the matter of Frederica's
"volunteering" not to be present in Spain at the time that Juan-Carlos became king. The reason cited is that the Spanish people might think that she wishes to involve herself in Spanish politics given her past with the Greeks.

Samantha

Jacqueline 04-29-2003 11:42 PM

Constantine de Grecia in Easter visit

In his second trip to Greece in two months after a 10-year absence, the former king Constantine arrived in Thessaloniki yesterday for a weeklong Easter holiday accompanied by his wife and their two eldest sons.

Traveling on an EU passport in the name of Constantine de Grecia — the same he used during a weekend visit to Athens in mid-February — the London-based former king landed at Thessaloniki airport at 1.40 p.m. on an Austrian Airlines flight. The former royals were expected to spend the night in Metsovo and will be in Ioannina for the Easter weekend. They will leave Greece on Tuesday.

It was the 62-year-old former monarch’s fourth visit since he fled the country in 1967 after organizing an abortive countercoup to unseat the eight-month-old military dictatorship, and follows the conclusion of a long court battle with the Greek government.

In November, the European Court of Human Rights awarded Constantine 12 million euros in compensation for the 1994 seizure — under a law drafted by current Culture Minister Evangelos Venizelos — of his Greek estates.

Article From: Kathimerini

Jacqueline 04-29-2003 11:44 PM

Former king

Former King Constantine of Greece yesterday visited the monastery of Tsouka, in the area of the northwestern town of Ioannina, on the second day of a weeklong Easter visit to Greece. London-based Constantine and members of the former royal family received communion from Theoklitos, Bishop of Ioannina. It was the former king’s second visit to Greece this year, and only the fourth since his flight from the country in 1967.

Article From: Kathimerini

Jacqueline 04-29-2003 11:52 PM

Former Greek king wraps up Easter holiday visit
Tue Apr 29,11:38 AM ET

SALONICA, Greece (AFP) - Greece's former king Constantine left Greece for his home in London, wrapping up a six-day visit to the country he headed between 1964 and 1967, reported the semi-official ANA news agency.

Under intense media scrutiny the ex-monarch, joined by his wife and two sons, toured northwestern Greece on the occasion of Greek Orthodox Easter.

During the visit, Constantine reiterated his plans to buy a residence in Greece, fuelling speculation he might again seek a political role in the future.

Constantine, who rose to the throne in 1964 at the age of 24, is a controversial figure in Greece for his role in the political crisis that led to military dictatorship in April 1967. He fled the country a few months later after the failure of a counter-coup he had sponsored.

Despite having renounced his throne after the restoration of democracy in 1974, when Greeks voted in a referendum against the monarchy, large parts of the Greek public fear he plans a political comeback.

Greece passed legislation in 1994 stripping Constantine and his family of their nationalities and fortune, and barring him from using the title of king.

Constantine -- who lives in London -- has been using his Danish citizenship to enter the country ever since, as Greek state authorities do not recognise his Greek papers on the ex-monarch's refusal to assume a family name as required under Greek law.

Article From: Yahoo News

Jacqueline 05-06-2003 09:02 AM

2 Attachment(s)
King Constantine

Queen Anne-Marie

Alexandria 06-08-2003 12:15 AM

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www.ibl.se

www.ibl.se

Jalmey 06-21-2003 11:44 AM

3 Attachment(s)
2000

Former King of Greece Constantine II
Constantine, the ex-King of Greece, sits with a book on his lap near a portrait of a woman.

Former King of Greece Constantine II
Constantine, the ex-King of Greece, sits with a book on his lap near a portrait of a woman.

Corbis

GREEK KING IN EXILE CONSTANTINE SMILES AT NAUTICAL CLUB IN MALLORCA
Original caption: MAD04:PALMA DE MALLORCA,SPAIN,6AUG99 - Greek King in exile Constantine smiles as he arrives at Palma de Mallorca's Nautical Club during the King's Cup August 6. Several members of the Greek Royal Family participate in the regatta named after Spanish King Juan Carlos in the Mediterranean resort where they traditionally spend their holidays. db/Photo by Dani Cardona REUTERS

anna 07-12-2003 10:04 AM

FORMER KING KONSTANTINOS IS VISITING GREECE
Ioannina, 10 July 2003 (17:34 UTC+2)
Former King of Greece Konstantinos is visiting the country with his wife and children.

Konstantinos arrived in the northwestern Greek city of Igoumenitsa from Ancona, Italy this morning on board a ferryboat.

The family of the former King left immediately for Kalpaki and visited the 8th Army Division Museum. After visiting the city of Ioannina, they will go to Preveza where they will spend the night.

http://www.hri.org/news/greek/mpab/2003/03...07-10.mpab.html

Alexandria 07-12-2003 10:39 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Polfoto 06-11-2000 Den 90-årige dronning Ingrid ligger syg i sit hjem på Fredensborg Slot. Hoffet meddeler at dronningen ikke lider af en bestemt sygdom, men at sygedommen er aldersbetinget. Dronning Ingrids familie, døtrene Margrethe, Anne Marie og Benedikte, samt børnebørn og oldebørn, er samlet om hende på Fredensborg Slot. Eksdronning Anne Marie af Grækenland forlader Fredensborg Slot for en kort stund.

Polfoto 13-01-2000 EL ESCORIAL, MADRID, SPAIN, 2000 January 13th: Members from several Royal Families and authorities attended the funeral for María de las Mercedes de Borbón y Orleans, Countess of Barcelona and mother of King Juan Carlos, who died on the 2nd of January. The Spanish Royal Family presided the event that took place at the Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo del Escorial. In the image, Kings Constantino and Ana María of Greece.

Jalmey 07-12-2003 03:06 PM

7 Attachment(s)
www.ibl.se

Mandatory Credit: Photo By TIM ROOKE/REX FEATURES PRINCE PAVLOS, PRINCESS MARIE CHANTAL, EX KING CONSTANTINE, EX QUEEN ANNE MARIE AND PRINCE NIKOLAOS EX KING CONSTANTINE AND FAMILY PRESS CONFERENCE REGARDING EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS DECISION ON GREEK GOVERNMENT'S TAKING OF HIS PROPERTY, CLARIDGES HOTEL, LONDON, BRITAIN - 05 DEC 2002

www.ibl.se

Mandatory Credit: Photo By TIM ROOKE/REX FEATURES EX KING CONSTANTINE, EX QUEEN ANNE MARIE, PRINCE PAVLOS, PRINCESS MARIE CHANTAL AND PRINCE NIKOLAOS EX KING CONSTANTINE AND FAMILY PRESS CONFERENCE REGARDING EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS DECISION ON GREEK GOVERNMENT'S TAKING OF HIS PROPERTY, CLARIDGES HOTEL, LONDON, BRITAIN - 05 DEC 2002

www.ibl.se

Mandatory Credit: Photo By TIM ROOKE/REX FEATURES EX KING CONSTANTINE, EX QUEEN ANNE MARIE, PRINCE PAVLOS, PRINCESS MARIE CHANTAL AND PRINCE NIKOLAOS EX KING CONSTANTINE AND FAMILY PRESS CONFERENCE REGARDING EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS DECISION ON GREEK GOVERNMENT'S TAKING OF HIS PROPERTY, CLARIDGES HOTEL, LONDON, BRITAIN - 05 DEC 2002 398320/ROO

www.ibl.se

Mandatory Credit: Photo By TIM ROOKE/REX FEATURES EX KING CONSTANTINE EX KING CONSTANTINE AND FAMILY PRESS CONFERENCE REGARDING EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS DECISION ON GREEK GOVERNMENT'S TAKING OF HIS PROPERTY, CLARIDGES HOTEL, LONDON, BRITAIN - 05 DEC 2002 398320/ROO

www.ibl.se

Mandatory Credit: Photo By TIM ROOKE/REX FEATURES EX KING CONSTANTINE EX KING CONSTANTINE AND FAMILY PRESS CONFERENCE REGARDING EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS DECISION ON GREEK GOVERNMENT'S TAKING OF HIS PROPERTY, CLARIDGES HOTEL, LONDON, BRITAIN - 05 DEC 2002 398320/ROO

www.ibl.se

Mandatory Credit: Photo By TIM ROOKE/REX FEATURES EX KING CONSTANTINE EX KING CONSTANTINE AND FAMILY PRESS CONFERENCE REGARDING EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS DECISION ON GREEK GOVERNMENT'S TAKING OF HIS PROPERTY, CLARIDGES HOTEL, LONDON, BRITAIN - 05 DEC 2002 398320/ROO

www.ibl.se

Mandatory Credit: Photo By TIM ROOKE/REX FEATURES EX KING CONSTANTINE EX KING CONSTANTINE AND FAMILY PRESS CONFERENCE REGARDING EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS DECISION ON GREEK GOVERNMENT'S TAKING OF HIS PROPERTY, CLARIDGES HOTEL, LONDON, BRITAIN - 05 DEC 2002 398320/ROO

Josefine 07-25-2003 08:40 AM

http://www.varsity.cam

can´t find any date on this...

Feature: A reversal of fortune

As he approaches his sixtieth birthday, His Majesty King Constantine II, former King of Greece, talks to James Chau about his family and the Greek people.

Alexandra 09-18-2003 03:54 PM

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Today it is the 39 th wedding anniversary of Queen Anne-Marie and King Konstantin. She was such a sweet bride and he so charmant young man at that time. Oh, I sometimes miss those by-gone days. The sixties was so full of royal weddings and new babies and things.
Here just one picture to celebrate the royal couple.

Congratulations! :flower:

This from corbis, too.
On Les Royales Tribunes sites there are already lots and lotas of wedding pictures of the couple, so I do not want to put them all again on the site.

Josefine 09-29-2003 05:51 PM

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Prince FELIPE and ANNA MARIA of Greece Victoria Borbon Dos Sicilias married Markos Nomicos

www.greekroyalfamily.org

cuervo 10-02-2003 01:26 PM

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Valiable...

norwegianne 11-26-2003 04:53 PM

Some of these newspaper articles seems to imply (could be that I'm only reading it that way) that King Constantine has a Danish passport because his wife was born a danish princess...

But the royal house of Greece is linked to Denmark via the first king of Greece. So he doesn't have a Danish passport because he's married to Anne-Marie, but because he's part Danish. (An explanation given by the Danish court when there was spetacle in Denmark because he had a Danish diplomatic passport.) In fact the princesses & princes of Greece are also princes and princesses of Denmark.

Alexandria 11-26-2003 06:42 PM

Is there such thing as an EU passport, too? I thought I read that the members of the royal family had this passport and thus were able to travel to Greece now because they were no longer "citizens of Greece," but citizens of "Europe."

... I might be way off base on this one, however. The Danish passport thing does ring true, however.

Sean.~ 11-26-2003 06:43 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by norwegianne@Nov 26th, 2003 - 4:53 pm
Some of these newspaper articles seems to imply (could be that I'm only reading it that way) that King Constantine has a Danish passport because his wife was born a danish princess...

But the royal house of Greece is linked to Denmark via the first king of Greece. So he doesn't have a Danish passport because he's married to Anne-Marie, but because he's part Danish. (An explanation given by the Danish court when there was spetacle in Denmark because he had a Danish diplomatic passport.) In fact the princesses & princes of Greece are also princes and princesses of Denmark.

This came up a couple of years ago. The explanation was that they are descendants of King Christian IX. They are not Princes/ss of Denmark in their own right. The title is of Greece and Denmark (ie they can not refer to themselves as just Princes/ss of Denmark.

S

George 11-27-2003 03:07 AM

Almanach de Gotha, the secrets of the gotha, of the royal families of Europe by
Ghislaine de Diebach, Denmark is listed as: House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glucksbourg pp 93

discussion of morganatic marraiges: pp 96 "Her son, Prince Aage, married Countess Calvi di Bergolo, and after this morganatic marriage became Count Rosenberg. He enlisted in the Foreign Leigon and was killed in 1940."

"If the mediatised houses were deemed worthy of allying themselves to ruling famililes, the same did not apply to other familes of princes, dukes, or counts who , ins pite of tgheir fame or their antiquity, could not aspire to such an honor."

The example one: "the daughter of the prince of Croy or of the count Erbach might become empress of Austria or queen of Bavaria, but the daughter of a family as distinguished and ancient as tht of the prince of Bauffremont, or the daughter of the
duke of Marlborough, was not elegible."

Then the well known case of the future Emperor William I of Germany who loved
Princess Radziwill and he was not allowed to marry her. The old Emperior said it would be a morganatic marriage of unequils. Some courts in Europe are more
stricter than others who are more liberal.

Take Queen Victoria who allowed a morganatic marriage and allowed for the
heirs of this union to keep their place in line for the throne, while in other
nations such a union would make for heirs to be renounced the throne or
disbarred.

"Times have changed; great foreign alliances are looked upon as causes of trouble
and anxiety,and are no good." pp. 27

The other example, is of the Estgerhazys, (anyone read W magazine,
Countess Esterhazy writes her commentaries on the b ack and I have it on
good word a Princess so and so loves to read them religiously!)*
anyhow, the senior branch of Esgterhazys is not listed in the Almanac de Gotha,
but in the Taschenbuch der Grafglichen hauser, while the junior cadet branch is
listed as a mediatised in Gotha!

The writer Diebach goes on to explain the results of this strange parity,
"why the 'unequal unions" between the members of reigning families, and for better reasons, those of the sovereigns themselves, were not considered
valid from a dynastic point of view."

Morganatic marriage stems from some early sources-the high old German
root for "morgen gaben" the morning gift, what a man gives a woman he has
slept with the next morning as a parting gift.

The a la Danish style is called more danico, whereby a man can marry and
have three wives-but he has to be able to satisfy them!

as for the nation of Greece, in 1928 Gotha is listedas a Hellinic demikratica
so then one has to look for the "house name" of the originating members-
Danemark-
pp LV Table alphabetique

there are two listings--
(Sean get this noted)--

GLUCKSBIERG v DECAZES........406
GLUCKSBOURG v. HOLSTEIN...35,49,55,80
the second one is the one to look at:

Even though there is no "proper last name per se" of King Constantine-
let's just see what the 1928 Gotha has to say...

DANEMARK
(Maison de Slesvig-Holstein-Sonderbourg-Glucksbourg)
Lutherines-Chateau d'Amalienborg, Copenhague; Sorgenfri pres Lyngby, chat. de Fredensborg, Marselisborg pres d'Aarhus et Klitgaarden pres de Skagen-
Christian prince de Slesvig-Holstgein-Sonderbourg-Glucksbourg (fils du duc
Guillaume de Slevsig-Holstein-Sonderbourg-Gluksbourg, ne 4 janv 1785 +17 fevr 1831, v. maison de Holstein)fut designe comme successor du roi Frederic VII de la branche alneede la maison de Holstein-Oldenbourg, ne 6 oct 1808, +15 nov 1863,par le traite de Londresen date du 8 mai 1852 et par la loi de succession danoise du 31 juill 1853, et monta sur le trone sous le nom de Christian IX roi de
Danemark 15 nov 1863.-V. les editions de 1830, p. (15); 1848 p. 20 et 1892 ,
p. 32.-Les cadets portent suivant l'ordre de cabinet du 23 sept 1774 le nom et titre de princes ou princesses de Danemark avec la qualification d'Altesse, les fils du
roi et du prince royal avec la qualification d'Alt. Royale.

CHRISTIAN X-Charles-Frederic-Albert-Alexnadre-Guillaume roi de Danemark
et d'Islande, des Wendes et des Goths, duc de Slesvig, Hostein, Stormarn,
des Dithmarses, de Lauenbourg et d'Oldenbourg, Maj., ne a Charlottenlund 26 sept 1870, fils du roi Frederic VIII, ne a Copenhague3juin 1843, +a Hambourg 14 mai 1912 et de Louise nee Psse de Suede et Norvege, nee 31 oct 1851, m. 28 juill 1869,+20 mars 1926; succ. a son pere, gen. de l'armee sued. et de l'armee norveg., amiral hon.brit., maitre de l'O. de Elephant (here it goes on to ,list the
orders)*..."

continued--

"lets go down thelist on page 36 1 ere partie-Danemark and lets look at someone
everyone can know:
the Princess Dagmar of Denmark who married Tzar Alexander III of all the Russias, as she converted and became known as Maria Feodorovna.

FRERES ET SOEURS DU PERE

du mariage du gd-pere le roi Christian IX, ne a Gottorf 8 avril 1818, +a Copenhague 29 janv. 1906, avec Louise psse. de Hesse (-Cassel), nee a Cassel 7 sept 1817, m. a Copenhague 26 mai 1842, + au chat. de Bernstorff 29 sept 1898.

#1 Pr. Christian-Guillaume (Wilheim) - Feredinand-Adolphe-Georges, ne a Copenhauge 24 dec 1845, + a Salonique 18 mars 1913; Georges Ier
roi des Hellenes depuis le 6 juin 1863, signa un acte en vertu duquel son frere cadet et la descendance de ce dernier le precederont lui et sa descendance , dans la succession au trone en DANEMARK, 12 sept 1863, v. Grece.

#2. Psse Marie-Sophie-Frederique-DAGMAR, nee a Copenhague 26 nov 1847,
(orthod. depuis...oct. 1866). D. de l'O de St. Andre, m., sous le nom de MARIE-FEODOROVNA, a St-Petersbourg 9 nov 1866 a Alexnadre-Alexandreovitch gd-duc her.. puis Alexnadre III empereur de Russie. Maj., + 1er nov 1894 [Chat. d' Amalienborg, Copenhague, et Villa Hvidoere pres Klampenborg, Danemark).

So there you have it.

laskaris 01-16-2004 08:09 AM

1 Attachment(s)
:heart:
ETA: Gettyimages picture/Mandy

Just C 03-29-2004 08:47 PM

Hello,
I read somewhere that King Constantine is going to be in Boston this week seeing Princess Theodora in a play. Does anybody have any further details (ie: when he is going to be in Boston, what play she is doing, etc.?)
Thanks,
C

Fireweaver 03-31-2004 01:18 PM

I hadn't heard that about Boston, but I did hear that he was in Greece with Pavlos and M-C for a while.

Alexandria 03-31-2004 01:51 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Fireweaver@Mar 31st, 2004 - 1:18 pm
I hadn't heard that about Boston, but I did hear that he was in Greece with Pavlos and M-C for a while.
I hve heard that, too, Fireweaver. They are there now, and I am not sure if they will be right through to Easter, or if they will return to Greece for Orthodox Easter celebrations, but they do plan on being in Greece for Easter.

irishchic5 03-31-2004 10:12 PM

I haven't heard anything about the King being in Boston, and I live in Boston. But then again, I didn't know that Princess Theodora was here in Boston either! :innocent:

Alexandra 04-01-2004 07:19 AM

:shock: What is she doing in Boston? :shock:

Jacqueline 04-01-2004 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Alexandra@Apr 1st, 2004 - 12:19 pm
:shock: What is she doing in Boston? :shock:
I believe that she is attending school there.

Alexandria 04-01-2004 09:10 AM

Is it Brown University she's attending? I thought I remember reading that somewhere.

Jacqueline 04-01-2004 09:41 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Alexandria@Apr 1st, 2004 - 2:10 pm
Is it Brown University she's attending? I thought I remember reading that somewhere.
If she is attending school in Boston, then she isn't at Brown. Brown is in Providence, Rhode Island.

She could be attending any number of good schools in Boston, however. Such as: Boston Conservarotry, Boston Univ., Emerson College, Emmanuel College, Suffolk...to name few. There are many schools in Boston.

cuervo 04-06-2004 07:26 AM

Maybe M.I.T.,Tuffts,Harvard.......?

USCtrojan 04-06-2004 08:43 PM

I love Boston. It will be interesting to see/find out what his majesty is doing or going to do in Boston. One of my favorite cities by far.

Chanel

kcc 05-16-2004 08:00 AM

i love this photo.beutifull anna-maria still so pretty at almost sixty.

Alexandria 05-16-2004 01:21 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by kcc@May 16th, 2004 - 8:00 am
i love this photo.beutifull anna-maria still so pretty at almost sixty.
I agree. Queen Anne Marie is one of the most beautiful women in the world. She exudes class, elegance and grace in everything she does. Her smile, I think, is one of the loveliest smiles ever. Of her sisters, I think she is the prettiest one.

Unfortunate that Greece's monarchy isn't still in existence so that we could see more of this lovely Queen on a daily basis and in action. I believe she would've served Greece very well.

samitude 05-17-2004 09:30 AM

I have seen that tiara many times, but I don't believe I've ever seen the emeralds light up like that!

Jackswife 05-17-2004 09:36 AM

She's got a quiet kind of charisma to her, a very natural ease and elegance. And the emeralds make me swoon! A true royal timeless beauty. :flower:

Bubbette 05-21-2004 05:25 PM

She keeps looking better and better. Who is her surgeon! http://cache.gettyimages.com/comp/50883629...9C30E9B9B114CE8

cuervo 05-23-2004 05:08 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by kcc@May 16th, 2004 - 7:00 am
i love this photo.beutifull anna-maria still so pretty at almost sixty.
Gosh !!She looks 30 maximum!!As for my King almost 33-slightly older... :flower:

ReinaMissy 06-02-2004 10:16 AM

Cuervo, according to the wonderful book "A Place For Us" by now-U.S. citizen Nicholas Gage (born Nikola Gatzoiyannis in Lia), in Greece they don't celebrate birthdays, but name days. He was born in July 1939 but says that December 6 - the feast day of St. Nicholas - was what he always celebrated.

Is this still the custom or do people celebrate birthdays as well?

Angela - Natalia 06-02-2004 12:21 PM

:flower: From my late teens my saints day was 'little birthday' but the date clashes with something else so I don't keep it anymore. :(

cuervo 06-04-2004 09:48 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by ReinaMissy@Jun 2nd, 2004 - 9:16 am
Cuervo, according to the wonderful book "A Place For Us" by now-U.S. citizen Nicholas Gage (born Nikola Gatzoiyannis in Lia), in Greece they don't celebrate birthdays, but name days. He was born in July 1939 but says that December 6 - the feast day of St. Nicholas - was what he always celebrated.

Is this still the custom or do people celebrate birthdays as well?

He is a wonderfull writter and one of my favored!His book "Eleni"refered to his mother and generally to wwII era (partizan war)has been republished recently and as I heard sells well in Greece...I don't know if he added some chapters more,than the old edition,of the book-I must find out....

Anyway,the question was wether greeks celebrate name day more than their birthdays...Usually women don't celebrate birthdays after their 30's,focusing more on their name days !!Anyway,Cage left Greece at a young age and during the war,so I don't know the habbits of this era.

If the name days of father's and his son or mother's and her daughter are diary close they both selebrate 'em the same day.....That is all I know!!

Do you know if this book "A Place for us "is published in Greek also??

ReinaMissy 06-04-2004 01:21 PM

I'm not certain of that, but I'd check his official website (http://www.nickgage.com).

There are many references to the language in there; the funniest is when his older sister Olga was attempting to learn English and the teacher wanted her to say "Mary puts on her hat". The ultra-conservative Olga was horrified because the phrase "puts on" sounded almost exactly like putsa, which she couldn't bring herself to say! :lol:

moody 06-05-2004 01:23 PM

:wacko: Oh my God!!He has three sisters!Did they all learned English like that??Unfortunately the book has not yet been translated into Greek......

ReinaMissy 06-05-2004 02:22 PM

Actually he has 4 older sisters: Olga, Alexandra (called Kanta), Glykeria and Fotini. He writes that Kanta took to English very easily; Olga struggled quite a bit with it.

Eventually they all learned English ;)

cuervo 06-06-2004 08:28 AM

FOUR older sisters!!!He must feel either a herow or a king!Did he ever get married??Anyway as far as I know he's a hell of writter!!I only know his book Eleni,I also know that there was a film about his book...I remember Greek goverment didn't allow to shoot scenes of the film in Leas(Ioannina).so they went to Spain in an simmilar terrain..After when thw film was done,pro -communists made demonstrations out of the Cinemas!!A contre-edition after the title "The other Eleni"was written (a fiasco)....So, that is all I know

ReinaMissy 06-06-2004 02:33 PM

Yes - to a former Presbyterian from Minnesota, just like me! (actually, my mother is from Minnesota - I'm from Michigan). She converted to the Greek Orthodox form of Christianity so there would be no problems.

I know he has written that he has three children; I did a web search and saw a picture of his now adult son Christos; it's clear that he's dad's son. They look alike!

Bubbette 06-20-2004 12:16 PM

That photo looks about 40 years old. Is she still with him?

cuervo 06-20-2004 01:00 PM

When Someone is a King .....He IS a King of ALL the nation! !!!Now dear C.D show us the PHOTO with NUNS !!!You know this famous photo that the King Konstantine as Heir went during a visit to a female monastery,and as usual he photographed with a group of Nuns!After some years people like you C.D spread the rumor that HE has been with all of them!!!!!!!!!! There is also many photos with the Archbishop Damaskinos ...Why you don't post them???

CD. 06-21-2004 04:38 AM

Bubette,maybe I should have rephrased the point I was making. (As Aliki is dead!!!). KC "apparently" liked this actress before he even met QAM. So it's not an affair or anything like that. It was stated at the time that Queen Frederika vetoed the relationship.

Secondly Cuervo, your attitude is appalling. Oh, by the way he is NOT KING of any nation.

paloma 06-21-2004 08:07 PM

How accurate is the rumour that Constantine had an affair with Farah Diba, the former Empress of Iran?

Cuervo, Constantine is the Ex King of Greece.

ReinaMissy 06-21-2004 11:21 PM

Cuervo is quite obviously a royalist. He supports Constantine II. I'm certain he's very well aware that Greece does not have a monarchy any longer, since he does happen to be a native of said country and still resides there.

Why anyone would have an issue with such posts on a board about royalty is rather a mystery to me :rolleyes:

laskaris 06-22-2004 06:16 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by paloma@Jun 21st, 2004 - 7:07 pm
How accurate is the rumour that Constantine had an affair with Farah Diba, the former Empress of Iran?

Cuervo, Constantine is the Ex King of Greece.

No, He hadn't had any affair of the kind you mean my dear!

Konstantinos Vasileas ton Ellinon! Constantine of Greece is the answer to your question!!There is no other King of Greece!



Question this Ex-King stands for Excellent King?? Yes,I agree!!

CD. 06-22-2004 06:17 AM

Ex- King stands for Ex-King. He is no more I'm afraid. B)

laskaris 06-22-2004 06:18 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by ReinaMissy@Jun 21st, 2004 - 10:21 pm
Cuervo is quite obviously a royalist. He supports Constantine II. I'm certain he's very well aware that Greece does not have a monarchy any longer, since he does happen to be a native of said country and still resides there.

Why anyone would have an issue with such posts on a board about royalty is rather a mystery to me :rolleyes:

Sometimes I see him supporting All Six Kings ...together!!The guy is Crazy!! :woot: :woot: :woot:

CD. 06-22-2004 06:19 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by paloma@Jun 21st, 2004 - 7:07 pm
How accurate is the rumour that Constantine had an affair with Farah Diba, the former Empress of Iran?

Cuervo, Constantine is the Ex King of Greece.

Apparently so. They say the affair was rampant and that is why Q-AM left for Denmark.

laskaris 06-22-2004 06:20 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by CD.@Jun 22nd, 2004 - 5:17 am
Ex- King stands for Ex-King. He is no more I'm afraid. B)
Excellency in a King is always an idividual Excellency!!

CathyEarnshaw 06-22-2004 07:36 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by laskaris+Jun 22nd, 2004 - 5:16 am--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (laskaris @ Jun 22nd, 2004 - 5:16 am)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-paloma@Jun 21st, 2004 - 7:07 pm
How accurate is the rumour that Constantine had an affair with Farah Diba, the former Empress of Iran?

&nbsp; Cuervo, Constantine is the Ex King of Greece.

No, He hadn&#39;t had any affair of the kind you mean my dear&#33;

Konstantinos Vasileas ton Ellinon&#33; Constantine of Greece is the answer to your question&#33;&#33;There is no other King of Greece&#33;



Question this Ex-King stands for Excellent King?? Yes,I agree&#33;&#33; [/b][/quote]
It is unlikely that Tino, who received financial support from the Shah, would have had an affair with Farah. But he has had several extra marital relationships -and Claridges, with its rather discrete staff, is a good place for assignations.

Splodger 06-22-2004 04:01 PM

The thing is... the media machine loves to speculate on the events behind closed doors which are printed in the gossip sections and then assumed to be true beacuse its been printed. Eventualy when the press scoops on a true event all the other speculations that are usualy total fiction are then considerd to be the truth as well by defult. In the UK any member of the Royal Family, especialy William, only has to be seen near someone and they are either dating them or having an illicit affair with them :o . Im sure the Greek press had Constantine lined up with every society girl in the 1950s and 1960s beacuse lets face it, he was very good looking. However it is more than probable he has had affairs, just not with anyone we would ever imagine. I would suspect perhaps it was a result of having one that perhaps inspire he and Anne Marie to begine a new family with Theodora and Phillipos in the 1980s.

Its a different world they live in, no one is perfect and their marriage values are different and cant be easy... however what ever your view I do think that Anne Marie diserves praise as having always stood by her husband, has never aired her dirty laundry in public and always kept her dignity. She is a modle Queen Consort and i think shes luvley :heart: .

laskaris 06-23-2004 07:46 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Marlene+Jun 22nd, 2004 - 6:36 am--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Marlene @ Jun 22nd, 2004 - 6:36 am)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>
Quote:

Originally posted by laskaris@Jun 22nd, 2004 - 5:16 am
<!--QuoteBegin-paloma
Quote:

@Jun 21st, 2004 - 7:07 pm
How accurate is the rumour that Constantine had an affair with Farah Diba, the former Empress of Iran?

* Cuervo, Constantine is the Ex King of Greece.


No, He hadn&#39;t had any affair of the kind you mean my dear&#33;

Konstantinos Vasileas ton Ellinon&#33; Constantine of Greece is the answer to your question&#33;&#33;There is no other King of Greece&#33;



Question this Ex-King stands for Excellent King?? Yes,I agree&#33;&#33;

It is unlikely that Tino, who received financial support from the Shah, would have had an affair with Farah. But he has had several extra marital relationships -and Claridges, with its rather discrete staff, is a good place for assignations. [/b][/quote]
So,who&#39;s Treasurer are you??"Tino&#39;s" or Sachs??Because if you are not a treasurer .......

H.M. Margrethe 08-20-2004 12:49 PM

Græsk/dansk ekskongepar vil hjem

20-08-04: 17:59


Vi hører til i Grækenland, forklarede parret over for NYHEDERNE i Athen.
Foto: TV 2Ekskong Konstantin og eksdronning Anne-Marie flytter efter 37 år i eksil i London tilbage til Grækenland, for*tæller parret til TV 2/NYHEDERNE.

Konstantin og Anne-Marie tilbage til Grækenland


Fotos: Konstantin og Anne-Marie
"Vi har altid ønsket at komme hjem, og vi har altid følt os nostalgiske. Og nu, hvor det bliver til noget, er det vidunderligt. Vi er på udkig efter et hus, og det tager lidt tid. Vi venter, til vi har fundet det helt rigtige sted. Men det er en dejlig følelse at vende hjem," siger ekskongen til TV 2.

Kongeparrets eksil indledtes i 1967, da en gruppe officerer greb magten.

Grækenland blev en republik i 1974, så Konstantin og Anne-Marie er ikke stillet anderledes i landet end andre grækere.

Dengang beslaglagde regeringen parrets ejendomme og besiddelser, og først i 2002 fik ekskong Konstantin Den Europæiske Menneskerettighedsdomstols ord for, at staten skal yde erstatning for tabene.

Forholdet mellem parret og den græske regering er nu glimrende, forsikrer Konstantin over for TV 2.

H.M. Margrethe 08-20-2004 12:53 PM

News from the royal familiy of Greece
 
1 Attachment(s)
Græsk/dansk ekskongepar vil hjem

20-08-04: 17:59


Vi hører til i Grækenland, forklarede parret over for NYHEDERNE i Athen.
Foto: TV 2Ekskong Konstantin og eksdronning Anne-Marie flytter efter 37 år i eksil i London tilbage til Grækenland, for*tæller parret til TV 2/NYHEDERNE.

Konstantin og Anne-Marie tilbage til Grækenland


Fotos: Konstantin og Anne-Marie
"Vi har altid ønsket at komme hjem, og vi har altid følt os nostalgiske. Og nu, hvor det bliver til noget, er det vidunderligt. Vi er på udkig efter et hus, og det tager lidt tid. Vi venter, til vi har fundet det helt rigtige sted. Men det er en dejlig følelse at vende hjem," siger ekskongen til TV 2.

Kongeparrets eksil indledtes i 1967, da en gruppe officerer greb magten.

Grækenland blev en republik i 1974, så Konstantin og Anne-Marie er ikke stillet anderledes i landet end andre grækere.

Dengang beslaglagde regeringen parrets ejendomme og besiddelser, og først i 2002 fik ekskong Konstantin Den Europæiske Menneskerettighedsdomstols ord for, at staten skal yde erstatning for tabene.

Forholdet mellem parret og den græske regering er nu glimrende, forsikrer Konstantin over for TV 2.

ReinaMissy 08-20-2004 02:13 PM

Can you possibly translate for those of us who can't speak Danish?

laskaris 08-20-2004 06:31 PM

Athen - Athens Konstantin - Constantine

Og - and Anne- Marie -- Anna - Maria

Graekenland - Greece

TV2 - Second Danish channel Naeste - Next

Tilbage - Leave

Dansk - Danish Bang&Olufsen :Excellent technology
CD Player very expensive to buy
Kong - King

Kongelige - Kingdom

USCtrojan 08-26-2004 05:32 PM

Graekenland - Greece

Interesting!

mashed potatoes 08-30-2004 06:45 PM

Greek family palace at Tatoi
 
Are there any pictures of the palace at Tatoi? This is one of the palaces that was seized when the greek royal family was exiled.

Alexandra 09-18-2004 03:55 PM

Tatoi
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mashed potatoes
Are there any pictures of the palace at Tatoi? This is one of the palaces that was seized when the greek royal family was exiled.

Here is an address to Tatoi.
http://www.fbarnard.org.uk/greek01/greece01.htm

Alexandra 09-18-2004 04:00 PM

30.8.1946
 
Queen Anne-Marie's birthday is the 30.8. not the 31.8!


The 31.8 was Princess Diana's death day.
The 29.8. was Queen Astrid's death day.

laskaris 09-18-2004 08:54 PM

I was in Beijing
 
when i posted -the happy birthday post for my Queen- and as you know China is 24 hours fast,so iit seemed like I postponed the post.....!


31.08. was Madonna's concert in Berlin also.
29.08. Vangelis gave a concert in Athens
29.08. midday H.H Prince Nickolaos of Greece was enjoing his fredo in Athens...!(apologize)

You want more???

Lyonnaise 10-19-2004 03:57 AM

10 Attachment(s)
Winners at Dragon 75th anniversary regattahttp://www.colourpress.com/gfx/transpx.gifhttp://www.colourpress.com/gfx/transpx.gifhttp://www.colourpress.com/gfx/transpx.gifCelebration of the winners at Dragon 75th anniversary regatta at Saint Tropez. 260 Dragons are expected for the class 75th anniversary.

ETA: www.colourpress.com /Mandy

Lyonnaise 11-02-2004 02:00 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Former Greek King Constantine waves as he sails off, aboard his Dragon sailing boat in the harbour of St Tropez, southeastern France, before a regatta marking the 75th anniversary of the Dragon design, Thursday, Oct. 14, 2004. Some 260 Dragons take part in the regatta.

ETA: Source www.polfoto.dk /Mandy

Lyonnaise 12-08-2004 08:07 AM

5 Attachment(s)
King Constantine and Queen Anne-Marie of Greece with the the Duke of Westminister visited Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles. (Originally posted by pdas1201 in the British Forum. Thanks!!)

ETA: Source www.fotobank.com /Mandy

Josefine 12-08-2004 08:55 AM

8 Attachment(s)
and here are a few older photos

ETA: Source www.corbis.com /Mandy

Lyonnaise 12-15-2004 02:38 PM

10 Attachment(s)
ah, memories...

ETA: Source www.corbis.com /Mandy

Lyonnaise 12-15-2004 02:40 PM

5 Attachment(s)
some more photos...

ETA: Source www.corbis.com /Mandy

Lyonnaise 12-28-2004 04:59 PM

Ex-king in former palace
Thirty-seven years after he was forced to flee Greece, the country’s last king was received yesterday in the central Athens mansion that for some six decades served as the royal palace.

The visit by Constantine, the 64-year-old former monarch, to the Irodou Atticou St. presidential palace — his first since 1967 — was kept secret at first, and was only confirmed in the afternoon by President Costis Stephanopoulos’s press office.

“President Stephanopoulos accepted a plea by former King Constantine to visit the presidential palace, accompanied by his wife and family members,” a statement said. “During the visit, the president met the former king.”

Presidential sources said Stephanopoulos had agreed on “humanitarian” grounds, and that no formalities had been observed.

Constantine fled Greece months after the 1967 coup. The monarchy was abolished following a 1974 plebiscite, after the fall of the junta. Two years ago, the European Court of Human Rights awarded compensation to Constantine for the seizure of his properties in Greece by the Greek government in 1994.

from http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w.../12/2004_51077

Splodger 01-04-2005 10:36 AM

Did anyone in the UK see the documentry on Channel 5 just after christmas with Kirsty Young about King Constantine? The King who is not known for making documentries about his exile and life as an ex-ling agreed to make a film about the events leading upto the Junta and life after 1974. Although it was phrased he agreed to make the film, i suspect it might have been more of a request as there was considerable footage of him in Greece during the summer and his visits to Tatoi and it does tie in very nicley with his recent wedding aniversary and significant appearence in Greece during the Olympics. There were two sides shown, amoung the Kings supporters, his Private Secretary and the 'priest' (sorry i cant think of the greek name) of the Ortherdox Church in London were interviewed and a writer whos views were unclear as to whether they were dissmissing criticisms of the Kings Actions or simply constuctive critical analysis of events. I couldnt say that the documentry was overley outstanding as a peice of journalism and was not as informative of historical events either in favour, against or unbiased of the King and certainly came across more as a public relations activity on his part, than an anyalasis of his short reign, the junta and excile as Constantine maintained his silence on many questions and didnt say very much more than he has in the past which made me wounder what the point of it was. However it did provide an interesting hour of being "at home with the king."

I enjoyed hearing the King and Queen talk freeley about their feelings for Tatoi, and filling in little details such as pointing out the room where Pavlos was born for example, explaining a breif family history as they walked over the grave yard. It was nice to hear them both talk informaly, especialy as i had never heard Anne-Marie speak and was suprised that her english was better than her husbands whom seems to miss out the odd word occastionaly. However i do long for a televised documentry looking much further into the events of 1967 from all angles.

Queens 01-08-2005 02:45 PM

Did anyone tape the Interview??

Thanks
Q

Lyonnaise 01-16-2005 03:40 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Polfoto 15-01-2005 Jordan's Princess Sarvath, center, wipes a tear as her husband Prince Hassan , center row right, looks on during the funeral of Luxembourg's Grand Duchess Josephine-Charlotte inside the Notre Dame Cathedral in Luxembourg, Saturday Jan. 15, 2005. Josephine-Charlotte died of lung cancer Monday, Jan. 10 at age 77. Seated left is Greece's former King Constantine.

Lyonnaise 01-16-2005 04:19 PM

3 Attachment(s)
from the opening of the new opera in Copenhagen, Jan 15 2005

ETA: Source www.colourpress.com /Mandy

Reina 01-16-2005 06:27 PM

I hate to say this but KC annoys me. HE is always at every event. It is sad that he has no home to be a monarch over, but it get so annoying.

rere 01-16-2005 09:12 PM

KC and AM are related to a lot of royals. They are also friends to many others. So his presence is expected. I would be very upset if he didn't attend events (weddings, funerals, etc.) and he was my relative or friend. KC and AM have made the best of their situations and I respect them for this.
By the way, AM looks elegant. I love her jewelry.

Splodger 01-17-2005 04:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rere
KC and AM are related to a lot of royals. They are also friends to many others. So his presence is expected. I would be very upset if he didn't attend events (weddings, funerals, etc.) and he was my relative or friend. KC and AM have made the best of their situations and I respect them for this.
By the way, AM looks elegant. I love her jewelry.

I agree with RERE here. Constantine is invited to all these events, not as Head of State or King, but as friends and family. There are many more people, including commoner's who have not social presidence that attend these functions as well, the reason Constantine takes a high profile is because he was the former Head of State and a known figour to report on. Emperess Farah of Iran and the Count of Paris are also often in attendence at various events. They are all invited beacuse they are either friends or family if not both of the host, irespective of their current or former positions.

HMQueenElizabethII 01-17-2005 09:48 AM

1 Attachment(s)
King Constantine and Queen Anne-Marie at the funeral of Grand Duchess Josephine Charlotte:

GrandDuchess 02-02-2005 03:08 PM

1 Attachment(s)
King Constantine and Queen Anne-Marie today at the memorial service for Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester, in the St. Clement Danes church in London, the United Kingdom. Picture from Getty:

Anna_R 02-02-2005 07:13 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by GrandDuchess
King Constantine and Queen Anne-Marie today at the memorial service for Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester, in the St. Clement Danes church in London, the United Kingdom. Picture from Getty:

Another picture, this time from Colour Press

Alejandra 02-05-2005 09:55 AM

Photo of the Greek Royal Family in Athens.
 
New photos:D of Queen Anne-Marie in company of her grandchildren. The photos were published in an interview with her in HOLA magazine, January 2005.

http://miarroba.com/foros/ver.php?fo...2&ultimomsg=si


Foro de Realeza en Español/Spanish Forum about Royalty http://realezaenespanol.foro.st/)

SpiffyBallerina 02-05-2005 02:20 PM

Queen AM is an amazing person. In the interview, she says she is complety Greek and that Greece is her country even though she still remembers where she came from (meaning Denmark). I admire such a loyalty to a country that has been less than warm to her. Queen AM said that she raised her children to be very Greek. Nik was there and affirmed this by saying that when Alexia, Pavlos and Nik were bad, they were threatened by saying that they'd go to an English style school. :p
She also mentioned that Philippos is studying international relations at Georgetown like his brother CP Pavlos and his cousin CP Felipe of Spain did years ago. Theodora is studying theater at Brown.


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