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KikkiB 01-15-2005 11:09 AM

What did the monarchs & royals do during WWI & WWII?
 
Since it is 60 years since the end of WW2, and there is an discussion on the 60th anniversary-tread, I thought it would be interesting to know what the European monarchs did to help its people. And what did the rest of the royal family do during the war?

So I start by writing down what I know that King Haakon of Norway did during the war;
The King and CP Olav and some of the ministers had a rather action-filled run from the Nazis. After the King had refused to accept the Nazi government led by Quisling, they had to escape because the Germans had sent troops to catch them. They just barely avoided being captured, and managed to get on board a ship to London. The King arrived in London 7. June 1940 and worked with the Exile government who had been established in London in May 1940. From London The King and CP Olav led the resistance, and the King gave speaches on the radio to keep ut the spirit of the Norwegian people. These speaches became very important to the Norwegians.

CP Märtha and the children (Princess Astrid, Princess Ragnhild and Prince Harald) tried to escape to Sweden, but was refused entry. They were evacuated to the USA, and stayed there the entire war. They visited Norwegian training camps for pilots and soldiers in Canada to boost morale. They also became friends with president Roosevelt and his wife.

bct88 01-15-2005 11:35 AM

Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands and Prince Bernhard went to London. Queen Wilhelmina stayed in her home in England. I believe it was in South Mimms, England; a country village. The then Princess Juliana (later Queen) with Beatrix and Irene moved to Ottawa, Canada and stayed there during the war. That is where Princess Margriet, Mrs. van Vollenhoven was born.

H.M. Margrethe 01-15-2005 11:53 AM

The Danish Royal Family stayed in Denmark the whole war. CP Frederik and CP Ingrid helped alot of ther frindes flee to Sweden becaus som of them was jews.

King Christian always ride on a hors until he felt of it in 1944. The Danish citizens was always protect ther king when he was riding in Copenhagen.

norwegianne 01-15-2005 04:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KikkiB
CP Märtha and the children (Princess Astrid, Princess Ragnhild and Prince Harald) tried to escape to Sweden, but was refused entry. They were evacuated to the USA, and stayed there the entire war. They visited Norwegian training camps for pilots and soldiers in Canada to boost morale. They also became friends with president Roosevelt and his wife.

They were initially refused entry to Sweden, but got in after the guards at the border had a change of mind. They spent a short while in Sweden, but as Crown Princess Märtha's parents' flat was directly facing the German embassy it was not a good place for them to stay. President Roosevelt, who had become friends with the Crown Prince couple when they visited USA in the late 30s, invited them to board the ship heading out from Petsamo in then Finland. The ship was also carrying other dignitaries.

The Belgians stayed in Belgium. That caused them some trouble after the war.

Dennism 01-15-2005 05:03 PM

What did the Royals do during 1914-1918?
 
Thanks to KikkiB for giving me the idea for this thread. I have always been more interested in the First World War than the Second World War probably because of my great interest in the period leading up to 1914. The First World War also brought down several monarchies and empires as well. It forever changed the landscape not just in Europe but in America and the rest of the world. I felt sad this past summer when there was too little attention paid to the 90th anniversary of the start of the war. The importance of the war on the Royal families of Europe can not be underestimated. Also from a historical point of view, after 1914, anything and everything was possible from a military standpoint. Unfortunately, mostly to the detriment of the world community. So here´s a thread where we can talk about the actions of the Royal houses during the Great War.

selrahc4 01-15-2005 05:50 PM

In Japan, Emperor Hirohito acted as a devoted Japanese patriot, taking a keen interest in military progress and doing all he could to boost morale.

mixer2002de 01-15-2005 06:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by selrahc4
In Japan, Emperor Hirohito acted as a devoted Japanese patriot, taking a keen interest in military progress and doing all he could to boost morale.

Sure as he was god emperor in Japan. Thats why he was made to sign " I am not a god" by the Americans.

KikkiB 01-15-2005 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by norwegianne
They were initially refused entry to Sweden, but got in after the guards at the border had a change of mind. They spent a short while in Sweden, but as Crown Princess Märtha's parents' flat was directly facing the German embassy it was not a good place for them to stay. President Roosevelt, who had become friends with the Crown Prince couple when they visited USA in the late 30s, invited them to board the ship heading out from Petsamo in then Finland. The ship was also carrying other dignitaries.

The Belgians stayed in Belgium. That caused them some trouble after the war.

Thanks again for helping me sorting out my facts:)

And I just remembered something else that's kind of cool:D Since the war made food hard to get hold of sometimes, and there were rations and so on, the King let the people of Oslo plow up the park behind the palace and let them grow potatoes and other vegetable. How cool is that!

KikkiB 01-15-2005 06:28 PM

I don't think the Norwegian royal family did much during WW1, due to the fact that Norway was "neutral" (I think it can be questioned if Norway really was neutral, because the sympathies was with the UK and the allies). And also the Norwegian royal family was new to the country only being there for 9 years. I can't say that I've heard anything special that they did. Please correct me if I'm wrong:)

And I just saw a documentary on NRK1 about Grand Duchess Olga Romanov (the sister of the last tsar), and she worked as a nurse on the front during WW1.

ElisaR 01-15-2005 07:03 PM

The British Royal Family stayed in Britain during all the war.
The King worked in Buckingham Palace during the day and, I think, returned to Windsor Castle at night. The Queen was in Buckingham Palace when it was bombed in September 1940.
Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret lived at Windsor Castle.
They were urged to evacuate the two princesses to Canada, but the Queen replied: "The children won't go without me. I won't leave the King. And the King will never leave."
Princess Elizabeth made her first broadcast on October 1940, sending a message to the evacuated children.

sara1981 01-16-2005 02:26 AM

I watch video of Royal im not sure what years! about Windsors and Monaco but i did watch that video its very interesting in life and almost lost palaces everythings what worth for the palace needs! like Windsor Castle have fire in 1992 have carry out from Castle more worth about million.

im not fans of WW2!

Sara Boyce

Louise 01-16-2005 05:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by H.M. Margrethe
King Christian always ride on a hors until he felt of it in 1944. The Danish citizens was always protect ther king when he was riding in Copenhagen.

Not to be picky, but king Christian fell of his horse in october 1942, so actually he didn't ride trough Copenhagen during most of the war, although thats the general opinion:) .

KikkiB 01-16-2005 08:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ElisaR
The British Royal Family stayed in Britain during all the war.
The King worked in Buckingham Palace during the day and, I think, returned to Windsor Castle at night. The Queen was in Buckingham Palace when it was bombed in September 1940.
Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret lived at Windsor Castle.
They were urged to evacuate the two princesses to Canada, but the Queen replied: "The children won't go without me. I won't leave the King. And the King will never leave."
Princess Elizabeth made her first broadcast on October 1940, sending a message to the evacuated children.

I remember to have seen a picture of a young adult Princess Elizabeth with her hands fiddling with something in a trucks' engine. I think she served with the Army's transport corps. "During World War II she trained as a junior subaltern (second lieutenant) in the women's services". (quote from www.encylopedia.com) A well done war effort, doing something practical and hands on!

I don't seem to find the picture I mentioned on the internet, but if someone know which picture I'm talking about, and finds it, please post it!!

Dennism 01-16-2005 04:14 PM

She worked as a nurse? Wow. I didn´t know that. Brave woman.

gogm 01-16-2005 10:09 PM

It looks like they tried to do business as usual. Look at the pictues of Zita's wedding. They kept up appearances as best they could in an atmosphere of total war.

I have seen a number of pictures of royals in uniform or nurse's clothing. The Kaiser's son was, if I recall correctly, heavily involved in the bloodbath at Verdun. British royals served as nurses.

ElisaR 01-17-2005 06:34 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by KikkiB
I remember to have seen a picture of a young adult Princess Elizabeth with her hands fiddling with something in a trucks' engine. I think she served with the Army's transport corps. "During World War II she trained as a junior subaltern (second lieutenant) in the women's services". (quote from www.encylopedia.com) A well done war effort, doing something practical and hands on!

I don't seem to find the picture I mentioned on the internet, but if someone know which picture I'm talking about, and finds it, please post it!!

:eek: I'm silly!!!!

I forgot! Of course! She was in the ATS!

I quote the official site:
In early 1945 the Princess was made a Subaltern in the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS). By the end of the war she had reached the rank of Junior Commander, having completed her course at No. 1 Mechanical training Centre of ATS and passed out as a fully qualified driver.


On 14 October 2003 the Queen opened "Women at war" exibition at the Imperial War Museum. There was a section dedicated to ATS (there were also pictures and documents about her).
There's a page about this engagement on Royal Insight, with pictures and more informations about the Queen in the ATS.
Link: http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/page2645.asp

NOTE: october 2003 is currently the last month in the list, so it is about to be removed! If you are interested, save all! Text and picures!

I post pictures of the ATS princess.

Nichola 01-17-2005 07:31 PM

Regarding the British Royal family, I have found the following article describing the actions of the late Queen Mother, who was Queen of England during World War Two:

Her world at war

By CNN's Avril Stephens

http://edition.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2002...r/bombsite.jpg The Royal Family inspect bomb damage to Buckingham Palace during World War II, 1940
LONDON, England (CNN) -- The Queen Mother was a rallying point for a beleaguered nation during World War II.

She stood firm against the threat of invasion by Adolf Hitler's Third Reich and won the hearts and minds of the public by her wartime work and wit.

The Queen Mother and her husband, King George VI, were ill prepared for the role thrust upon them by the abdication of Edward VIII only two years earlier.

The couple had been active supporters of Neville Chamberlain's policy of appeasement, and during the early bombing of London, Coventry and Plymouth she would visit dressed in the finest satin and furs.

It was only when part of Buckingham Palace was bombed in September 1940 that she felt she could relate to the suffering being endured by the country.

While surveying the damage she famously said: "I'm glad we have been bombed; I feel I can look the East End in the face."

She had resisted calls for herself and her two teen-age daughters, Elizabeth and Margaret, to flee London for the safety of North America.

"The children will not leave unless I do," various sources have reported her as saying. "I shall not leave unless their father does, and the king will not leave the country in any circumstances whatever."

The royal standard flew defiantly over the palace throughout the war, and the Queen Mother learned how to shoot a revolver, practising her aim in the palace gardens.

The Queen Mother toured the country regularly, sharing in its woes, visiting badly damaged hospitals and factories, and keeping up the morale of the troops.

http://edition.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2002...mum.ve.day.jpg Queen Elizabeth II (left), the Queen Mother (centre) and Princess Margaret wave from the balcony of Buckingham Palace on V-E Day, May 8, 1995
Her smile, coupled with the bulldog spirit of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, helped keep the country together.

It was in stark contrast to the actions of the Duke of Windsor, who, after his abdication and the fall of France in 1940, deserted his post as a British officer and fled to Spain and neutral Portugal, after which he was sent to the Bahamas as governor.

During his time in Portugal, Edward exchanged correspondence with Hitler, whom he and the Duchess of Windsor, Wallis Simpson, met shortly after the abdication.

The Queen Mother drew on her experiences during World War I to help her through the Blitz. As a teen-ager, she, elder sister Rosie and their mother, Lady Strathmore, cared for soldiers, writing letters for them to their loved ones and running errands to buy their tobacco.

The family also learned to cope with loss when the Queen Mother's elder brother, Fergus, was killed at the Battle of Loos in 1915 and another brother, Michael, was held prisoner for two years.

During World War II, she encouraged her daughter, the future queen, to help the youth of the country.

Princess Elizabeth made her first broadcast in October 1940 to all the children caught up in the war, especially those who had been evacuated for safety reasons.

When victory came, the royal family appeared on the balcony of Buckingham Palace and shared in the country's joy and relief.

King George VI said in his VE Day broadcast on May 8, 1945: "The Queen and I know the ordeals which you have endured throughout the Commonwealth and Empire.

"We are proud to have shared some of these ordeals with you, and we know also that together we shall all face the future with stern resolve and prove that our reserves of willpower and vitality are inexhaustible."

Fifty years later, the Queen Mother was to stand on the Buckingham Palace balcony again, this time for VE Day anniversary commemorations. She also officially opened events in Hyde Park.

In a solemn yet uplifting ceremony, the Queen Mother paid her own moving tribute.

"This day will bring back many memories to many people," she said. "And I hope that all those who go to the many ceremonies will remember with pride and gratitude those men and women, armed and unarmed, whose courage really helped to bring us victory. God bless them all."

Marengo 01-17-2005 07:49 PM

Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands was making sure that her country would stay out of the war. She motivated the mobilised army throughout the country and made sure that her husband, german-born Prince Hendrik would not become involved in po-german plots.
In the aftermath she had a hard time when Kaiser Wilhelm II was at the dutch border as he wanted to take refuge in the netherlands. Although she allowed him to enter & stay in the country she refused to meet him during the 23 years he lived in the Netherlands (where he was always stressing his ties with the house of Orange). After the war she supported various members of the Mecklenburg dynasty financially but made sure that more sdistant relatives wouldn t come knocking on her door for money (helas...so she let Ducky's russian jewels go to Queen Mary). The Queen was also involved in the care for the belgian refugees.

King Albvert I and his Elisabeth stayed in their country, at a mansion near the coast. Queen Elisabeth nursed the wounded soldiers & the King was always with the army. the classical hero & soldier-king.

DDD 04-04-2005 09:44 AM

The Dutch royal family fled to England. But before doing this, they hided all the expensive stuff behind the palace walls and in the houses of their staff. The jewels were put in a box. And when they fled with a jeep, princess Juliana took the box with her.
In England they were received by the English king and queen and they stayed a fews days in Buckingham Palace. After this princess Juliana and the little kids went to Canada.
Intresting story, right?

Alexandria 04-04-2005 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DDD
After this princess Juliana and the little kids went to Canada.
Intresting story, right?

Princess Margriet was actually born in Ottawa, (Ontario), Canada. So that she could have Dutch nationality, the land around the hospital where she was born was declared Dutch territory, so Princess Margriet was still Dutch-born. In Ottawa there is now a garden with hundreds of tulips, which were a gift from Princess Juliana to the Canadian government and people after the family returned to the Netherlands. And every spring the Dutch royal court continues to send hundreds of tulip bulbs as a reminder of Canada's kindess to Princess Juliana and her family at this time. Several years ago Princess Margriet came herself to see the tulips in bloom.


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