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Marengo 09-10-2011 06:18 PM

Henri, Count of Paris, Head of the Royal House of France (1908-1999)
 
To my surprise there was no thread for the late count around so I posted a new one.

--
The inheritance of the late count has been an ongoing issue the last 12 years. Much has been written about it at the time of his death and afterwards. According to this article in the Telegraph:

Prince Henri of Orléans's children close in on reclaiming family fortune - Telegraph

the count is supposed to have whispered to one of his daughters: 'I will leave you nothing but hatred'.

The family is still fighting the will as the count sold most things or put them in a foundation.

Marengo 09-10-2011 06:19 PM

And an article from 1999 from the LA Times:

Monique Friesz | France Baffled by Case of Missing Fortune - Los Angeles Times

Quote:

France Baffled by Case of Missing Fortune

Mystery: At death of pretender to throne, his vast estate has vanished.


August 02, 1999|JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG | TIMES STAFF WRITER
PARIS — When Henri d'Orleans, count of Paris and pretender to the French throne, died this summer at the ripe old age of 90, the blue-blooded playboy who had been one of France's wealthiest men left behind a puzzling, bizarre legacy.
In the bungalow where the Bourbon aristocrat had lived with his mistress, bailiffs found a pair of bedroom slippers and six handkerchiefs embroidered with the royal crest. And nothing else belonging to him.


Read more here.

Kasumi 09-11-2011 05:50 PM

90th birthday - Henry Count of Paris

jonc93 09-21-2011 11:47 AM

Everytime I watch that video I feel sorry for the late Countess. Her husband and her had been estranged for many years, he had a very public mistress, sold her jewelry, their home in Portugal (without telling her) and done many other horrible things, yet she's holding on to him and kissing him as if they were happily married, but it was just a show royals put up just for appearances!

Benjamin 09-21-2011 01:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jonc93 (Post 1318646)
yet she's holding on to him and kissing him as if they were happily married, but it was just a show royals put up just for appearances!

I don't think it was a show as far as Madame was concerned. True, they did live apart for many years, but I honestly don't believe that the Countess ever fell out of love with her husband.

expat 10-14-2011 10:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jonc93 (Post 1318646)
Everytime I watch that video I feel sorry for the late Countess. Her husband and her had been estranged for many years, he had a very public mistress, sold her jewelry, their home in Portugal (without telling her) and done many other horrible things, yet she's holding on to him and kissing him as if they were happily married, but it was just a show royals put up just for appearances!

The only comment I can make is that the Countess was a Lady in all the meanings of the word. Noblesse oblige.

cmbruno 10-14-2011 11:56 AM

He not only disappeared with historical French objects but also with Brazilian ones he had no right to because they belonged to Madame.
Why did he change so much? Or had he always been so mean and selfish?

fearghas 10-14-2011 08:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cmbruno (Post 1326279)
He not only disappeared with historical French objects but also with Brazilian ones he had no right to because they belonged to Madame.
Why did he change so much? Or had he always been so mean and selfish?

It has been my experience, after working with elderly people for two decades, that many becomeincredibly selfish as they get older and sicker. Not all of course. But I have seen many cases where people in their 80s have demanded that their children (or usually one, the one who has been looking after their parents the most) give up their jobs, spouses, own children, and in effect their whole lives, to care for the elderly parent. And then treat that child with the most disgusting diplays of humiliation, verbal and even physical violence and a total disregard of the younger persons wellbeing. From what I have seen or read about the Count of Paris, he was inately a selfish and arrogent person to start with and only got worse as he grew older. Perhaps he became very bitter when the French throne didn't eventuate for him.

jonc93 10-14-2011 10:44 PM

Well according to an article one of his kids said that he became extremely bitter when De Gaulle ran for a second term because De Gaulle told him that he wouldn't run for a second term because the monarchy would be restored. As his children said " he wasn't succeeding so he didn't want to see any of his kids succeed"

maria-olivia 10-15-2011 09:27 AM

Jonc93, Exactly, He really thought a moment he would be King of France.
Therefore at Clair Volant they were every year pictures of the whole family de France.
The Glittering Wedding of the Dauphin Henri with Duchess Marie Thérèse of Wurtenberg was this most glorious day . General de Gaulle did not assist but said : it is an important Event for France.

maria-olivia 10-15-2011 09:31 AM

Another Story about him I read in the book of HRH Prince Michel de Grèce.
As Orphan he lived at the Count de Paris , his Uncle's home.
He wrote in his book that the Count de Paris coming late at home kissed every Child before they were sleeping. Not the Comtesse !

fandesacs2003 10-15-2011 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by expat (Post 1326260)
The only comment I can make is that the Countess was a Lady in all the meanings of the word. Noblesse oblige.


I have exactly the same opinion. She was a real LADY. She suffered all her life from this marriage with dignity. The late count de paris was marcyless and egoist. He arranged the best of Gotha weddings for quite all his childred without really asing them. When his first son wanted to divorce he rejected him and he transmitted the title to his grandson. He made disappear quite all his enormous and historical fortune . Very difficult and bitter person.:eek:

Sancia 10-15-2011 11:40 AM

The countess was not an easy person to live with, according to some of her relatives. She could be lovely, or stiff. And she wanted to behave and act as if her husband and her were not separated, while everyone knew their common life was over. It seems rather hypocritical.

About the story told by prince Michel of Greece, the count took care of the boys, the countess of the girls, so their sons and their daughters don't have the same opinion about both their parents.

Lenora 01-05-2012 05:06 AM

A new book about the friendship between Count of Paris and the French president Francois Mitterand has appeared recently in France,its title is "La Rose & Le Lys"(Francois Mitterand and Count of Paris 1986-1996).More information here:
Noblesse & Royautés » «*La rose et le lys*»

cmbruno 01-05-2012 08:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sancia (Post 1326558)
... And she wanted to behave and act as if her husband and her were not separated, while everyone knew their common life was over. It seems rather hypocritical...

Madame was catholic and royal. It was, for her, inadmissible to accept failure in her marriage. And I guess the Count felt the same way as he never divorced her. He acted the way he wanted, why couldn't she do the same?

Sancia 01-05-2012 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cmbruno (Post 1354397)
Madame was catholic and royal. It was, for her, inadmissible to accept failure in her marriage. And I guess the Count felt the same way as he never divorced her. He acted the way he wanted, why couldn't she do the same?

As a catholic, I understand her principles. Still, I find rather hypocritical to lead separate lives and though to celebrate with a big party their 60th wedding anniversary.

cmbruno 01-05-2012 09:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sancia (Post 1354406)
As a catholic, I understand her principles. Still, I find rather hypocritical to lead separate lives and though to celebrate with a big party their 60th wedding anniversary.

It was just the way things were done till their generation.
And I guess Madame was the great Dame she was because she washed her dirty laundry at home, never showing the world her sorrow. I am sure she died thinking she honoured her duties and her family, which is the biggest goal a royal woman born at her time could dream of achieving. And yes, it may look hypcritical nowadays. Would I act like she did if I were in her shoes? No way! But again, I would not be considered a Dame and a perfect would be Queen. In the end, I think everybody considers her much more Royal than the Count. She was the real deal.

Marengo 06-05-2013 11:02 AM

A programme about the late comte de paris and about the disappearance of his fortune. They claim that at the end of WWII he owned 1 billion francs. Stephane Bern, Prince Michel of Greece, the count's nephew, and the present comte de paris also participate in the programme.


Secrets d'actualité - L'héritage du comte de Paris (1 sur 3) - YouTube

Secrets d'actualité - L'héritage du comte de Paris (2 sur 3) - YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9N4AIRd4_4

It is the first time that I have seen an image of/interview with Monique Friese. She says they were very happy together, and he was very cheerful when he was with her. Prince Michel believes that it was love from both sides, though the voice over says hints that she was after his money, as the counts children believe.

rominet09 09-20-2013 06:04 PM

Les héritiers du comte de Paris récupèrent une part du "trésor des rois" - RTL info-
They win at last !

Google translation

The heirs of Count Paris recover a share of " Treasure of Kings"
20-9-2013

After twelve years of proceedings , the heirs of Count Paris will be able to recover the "historical treasure property of the kings of France" , which included paintings, valued at "several million euros", according to their lawyer, Mr. Olivier Baratelli .

Ten heirs of Count of Paris Henri d' Orleans , who died in 1999 , initiated in 2001 a long legal battle to recover property that their grandfather had given to the St. Louis Foundation he had created. The Tribunal de Grande Instance de Paris has however refused to surrender the castles and chapels they also claimed.

In a statement , Mr. Baratelli , lawyer for Jacques d'Orléans and Hélène d'Orléans , on Friday hailed the "historic" ruling Thursday that "sees a court of the Republic give children the French family property which had been given away by those who thought they could circumvent the laws of the Republic . " For its part, counsel for the St. Louis Foundation , Mr. Thomas Rouhette , said the judgment was " quite favorable" to his client .

The court held that the donation of the Count of Paris in 1976 was tainted by " absolute nullity " lack of administrative one hand and deed before a notary on the other hand , according to Mr. Baratelli. Two "omissions" which, according to counsel, showed the willingness of the Count of Paris to "conceal considerable property he wanted to deprive his children."

Thus , the foundation must return to the heirs portraits of Louis XIII and Louis XIV child by Philippe de Champaigne, sketchbook Louis XIV realized at the age of seven years, the portrait of the Duchess of Orleans, the manuscript of the Statutes of the Order of St. Michael dating from the late fifteenth century.

The heirs will also recover a "compendium of Finance" of Louis XIV dating from 1682, Velvet calligraphy, watercolors Carmontelle and Prince de Joinville, the Grand Collar of the Order of the Garter, and a Sevres dinner service delivered in 1840 to Queen Marie-Amélie .

At the hearing in May , the foundation, which owns and manages the royal heritage , said it was ready to return to the heirs the movables . "There was a general agreement on the return of these objects ," said Friday Rouhette me. The heirs have however been rejected their requests for Amboise and Bourbon l'Archambault , the Royal Chapel of Dreux and expiatory chapel of Paris. Especially because these donations were made over 30 years before they are challenged in court, but also on the bottom, according to Mr. Rouhette .

"What we want is that these heirlooms serve as a backdrop to these iconic furniture so that they could be exposed to the public eye ," pleaded Mr. Olivier Baratelli , lamenting that the drawings are of Louis XIV " stored in a morocco at the bottom of a drawer." According to Mr Rouhette, these
objects could not be exposed at Amboise for reasons of safety and stewardship , but were loaned for exhibitions, notably at Versailles for Louis XIV designs. The returned objects are intended to be exposed to Versailles for 70 drawings of Louis XIV , or the Louvre to the table of Louis XIII, according to Mr. Baratelli .

At the end of his life , the Count of Paris had excécrables relations with his family. "They have nothing but their tears to cry ," he reportedly said about his children that he had begun to hate . This hatred was born of frustration , in the sixties , when the direct descendant of Louis XIII, great-great -grand- son of Louis Philippe , he saw his political ambitions permanently destroyed.

Thus the Count "sold off" the family heritage and created the Saint Louis Foundation, to which he bequeathed those items he had not sold.
.

Moonmaiden23 09-20-2013 06:08 PM

Hurray! I am happy about this-


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