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Next Star 05-03-2007 07:11 PM

The Dukes of Burgundy (Valois)
 
What happened to the Duke of Burgundy and the rest of the ducal family are there are any descents still alive or did the family line die out?

Avalon 05-03-2007 08:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Next Star
What happened to the Duke of Burgundy and the rest of the ducal family are there are any descents still alive or did the family line die out?

Note: At the end there are explanations of some terms that might not be clear from reading the below.


The Duchy of Burgundy 'belonged' to several Houses.

The first Duke of Birgundy was Richard the Justiciar, from the House of Ardennes. After the last descendant of the dynasty, Otto-Henry (the Great) died without male heirs, Burgundy was inherited by his step-son, Otto-Willelm. However in 1004 (?) the Duchy of Burgundy was annexed to the Crown of France by King Robert II of France (Robert was the son of Hugh Capet and Otto-Henry was Hugh Capet's younger brother. Therefore Robert was the legitimate heir.) However though Otto-Willelm was deprived of actual Dukedom of Burgundy, he continuted to reign over the so-called free County of Burgundy. There were 3 counts, if I'm not mistaken, after which it was mered with the Dukedom again.

Robert II belonged to the House of Capet (he was Hugh Capet's son), therefore the second house that 'owned' the Duchy was the Capetian. He was succeded by Henry I, who was also the Duke of Burgundy (and the last Capetian Duke). Robert, aided by his mother, rebelled against Henry and the peace was achieved only when he was given the Dukedom of Burgundy, thus establishing the House of Burgundy.

The last Duke of the House of Burgundy was Philip I, Duke of Burgundy. Philip was not only Duke of Burgundy (inherited from his grandfather) but also Count of Burgundy and Artois (inherited from his grandmother). He married Maragret (heiress of Flanders) however died in the same year (of plague), without heirs.
The Duchy was inherited by the closest living relative (paternal line), King John II of France (the county was inherited by someone else from his maternal line).

After John II inherited the Duchy (1361), the third House gained the possession of it - the House of Valois. The House of Valois owned the Dukedom untill 1482. The last Duke of Burgundy, Charles I the Bold had only 1 surviving daughter, Mary. After his death Mary became the Duchess of Burgundy.

In 1477 Mary was made to sign the charter of rights, called the Great Privilege (?). According to the charter the provinces of Flanders, Brabant, Holland and Hainaut (major parts of Burgundy) retained all the local and community right. Basically the Dukedom of Burgundy stopped existing ever since. Parts of it were annexed by France. Mary retained only small parts of the original Duchy.
She married to Archduke Maximilian of Austria (later Maximilian I, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire). That's how the Low Countries came to the Habsburgs, starting a contention between France and the Habsburghs (later Spain and then Austria) for 3 centuries. The contention reached its highest point during the War of the Spanish Succession.

After Mary's death, Louis XI of France forced Maximilian to agree to the Treaty of Arras, by which Franche Comte and Artois passed to French rule. Later Franche Comte and Artois were changed for the County (not Duchy) of Burgundy and Picardy by the Treaty of Senlis (spelling?).

Basically Mary was the last Duke (Duchess) of the Burgundy. Her son, Philip I of Castile, inherited only the Burgundian Netherlands (though still quite a big part of the former Duchy). His sucessors inherited the Burgundian Netherlands as well until at some point there were divided between and invaded by various countries (France, Netherlands, Germany, Luxembough, Belgium).


Notes:
*Burgundian Netherlands - Union of 17 Provinces, covering (roughly) the current Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourgh and parts of France (and a part of Germany, if I'm not mistaken).
* Low Countires - Historical region of de Nederlanden
* De Nederlanden - not to confuse historical Netherlands (covering most of the Burgundian Netherlands, including Low countires) and current country (which occupies only part of the historical one), the Dutch speakers usually speak of Nederland (singular) for the current country and de Nederlanden for the historic part. In English (roughly) Netherland (or Holland) for the current country, the Netherlands (plural) for the historic one.

HRH Kimetha 05-25-2007 09:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Avalon
The Duchy of Burgundy 'belonged' to several Houses.

Thanks, Avalon, for your indepth discussion on the French royalty of the past and their relationship with other countries/royals.

Princess Robijn 05-26-2007 04:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Avalon

Notes:
*Burgundian Netherlands - Union of 17 Provinces, covering (roughly) the current Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourgh and parts of France (and a part of Germany, if I'm not mistaken).
* Low Countires - Historical region of de Nederlanden
* De Nederlanden - not to confuse historical Netherlands (covering most of the Burgundian Netherlands, including Low countires) and current country (which occupies only part of the historical one), the Dutch speakers usually speak of Nederland (singular) for the current country and de Nederlanden for the historic part. In English (roughly) Netherland (or Holland) for the current country, the Netherlands (plural) for the historic one.

Not sure about others, but in English, at school we learned ALWAYS to use (The) Netherlands, never Netherland, with that, Holland is often used, but incorrect, Holland is just 1 of the provinces over here ;)

Avalon 05-26-2007 12:55 PM

You are most welcome, HRH Kimetha. :flowers:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Princess Robijn
Not sure about others, but in English, at school we learned ALWAYS to use (The) Netherlands, never Netherland, with that, Holland is often used, but incorrect, Holland is just 1 of the provinces over here ;)

I was always tought that was as well (the Netherlands) Princess Robjin. I got the information from "Burgundy: In Past and Present" and I think it was also mentioned in another one on the French Kingdoms.

Of course, as a native Dutch, you know better, so I guess it's just a mistake. The book did mention that the translation to 'Netherland' is rough and is only given to explain the difference between Nederland and de Nederlanden, not as a currect term to refer to the country. :smile:

Marengo 01-16-2009 08:54 AM

The Dukes of Burgundy (Valois)
 
Welcome to the thread dedicated to the Dukes of Burgundy, belonging to the house of Valois.


Arms of the House of Burgundy (after 1430)

List of Dukes:

* Philip II the Bold (1363–1404), fourth son of King John II of France
* John II the Fearless (1404–1419)
* Philip III the Good (1419–1467)
* Charles I the Bold (1467–1477)
* Mary I the Rich (1477–1482)

Note that before and afterwards the title has been held by various dynasties and princes. The last Duke of Burgundy was the future king Louis XV of France, in his times the title was however just a ceremonial one.

Marengo 01-16-2009 09:02 AM

The territory of the Dukes:

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/d...Picture1-1.jpg

RoyalistRiley 06-12-2009 09:59 PM

The Order of the Golden Fleece, one of the highest orders of chivalry of the Habsburgs, was originallly founded by Duke Phillip III the good in 1430 to commemorate his marriage to the Portugese Princess Isabel of Aviz. It reverted to the Habsburgs when they took over Burgundian lands before splitting into Austrain and Spanish Orders. Upon the collapse of Habsburg power in 1918, the King of Belgium asked to be given the power to award the Order as he ruled over some of the Duchy's territory. Hsi request was refused and today is awarded by HM the King of Spain and the Head of the House of Habsburg (unofficially).

Marengo 11-27-2009 05:19 AM

A genealogical tree that I made, which shows how the provinces of the low countries all ended up with Mary the Rich, Duchess fo Burgundy. Throguh her marriages it ended up with the Habsburgs, and her grandson Charles V inherited an enormous empire (German Empire, Low Countries, Spain and much of Italy):

http://i276.photobucket.com/albums/k...n3/burg7-1.jpg

QUEENECE29 11-27-2009 05:31 AM

First time I've learned very good information. Thanks Marengo.

RoyalistRiley 12-27-2009 06:37 AM

Amazing stuff Marengo! Thanks a lot!!!

If such a title of Duke of Burgundy existed today, who would be the Duke? Would it be a descendant of the House of Bourbon through Louis XV (the last person to use the title) or would it be a member of the Habsburg House?

15thC_Odette 03-31-2011 02:14 PM

There is a current Duke of Burgundy
 
His Majesty Juan Carlos I, King of Spain is currently styled Duke of Burgundy.

Next Star 02-24-2012 06:55 PM

The queen of the united Kingdom is too styled the Duke of Burgundy.

An Ard Ri 02-24-2012 07:36 PM

Louis Alphonse de Bourbon also styles himself as Duke of Burgundy (among others).

Warren 02-25-2012 03:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Next Star (Post 1375808)
The queen of the united Kingdom is too styled the Duke of Burgundy.

Elizabeth II is officially styled 'Duke of Normandy' in Jersey and Guernsey (and 'Duke of Lancaster' in Lancashire).
She is nowhere styled 'Duke of Burgundy'.

Artemisia 02-26-2012 10:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Next Star (Post 1375808)
The queen of the united Kingdom is too styled the Duke of Burgundy.

No, she isn't. The Queen is titled The Duke of Normandy, The Duke of Lancaster and the Lord of Mann (not Duchess or Lady, as only masculine forms of the titles exist). She isn't, and has never been, Duke of Burgundy. In fact, no English or British Monarch has ever claimed title to be part of the titles of the crown.

There are currently two people who contest the title of The Duke of Burgundy between them - King Juan Carlos of Spain and Prince Louis of Bourbon. King Juan Carlos uses the title as it has been one of the titles of the Spanish Crown since the restoration. Prince Louis of Bourbon is pretender to the title as the eldest son of the (legitimist) claimant to the French Throne, Louis Alphonse, Duke of Anjou.

An Ard Ri 10-20-2013 07:13 AM

Gift exchange at the court of Charles the Bold

Gift exchange at the court of Charles the Bold


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