The Royal Forums

The Royal Forums (http://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/)
-   British Royal History (http://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/f165/)
-   -   British Royal First and Second-Cousin Marriages (http://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/f165/british-royal-first-and-second-cousin-marriages-19027.html)

KathyMoore 11-10-2008 12:59 PM

British Royal First and Second-Cousin Marriages
 
are there any first/second-cousin marriages between British royals?
(current, or within the last 150 years)

magnik 11-10-2008 01:18 PM

How about:
Victoria Melita and Erna Ludwig von Hesse -
Princess Alice mother of Ludwig and Prince Alfred father of VM were siblings.
Marina nad George Duke of Kent weren't quite close cousins?

Iluvbertie 11-10-2008 04:40 PM

At 158 years (February 1840)- Queen Victoria and Prince Albert

Elizabeth II and Prince Philip are also cousins through common descent from both Victoria and Albert and Christian IX of Denmark and Louise.

Victoria - Edward VII - George V - George VI - Elizabeth II
Victoria - Alice - Victoria - Alice - Philip

Christian IX - Alexandra - George V - George VI - Elizabeth II
Christian IX - William I of the Hellenes - Andrew - Philip

MAfan 11-10-2008 05:07 PM

George V and MAry were Second cousins once removed
Maud and Haakon VII were first cousins
Louis of Battenberg and Victoria were first cousins once removed
irene of Hesse and heinrich of Prussia were first cousins

EmpressRouge 11-10-2008 05:47 PM

1904 - Prince Alexander of Teck (brother of Queen Mary) and Princess Alice of Albany, later Earl and Countess of Athlone, second cousins once removed descended from George III:
George III-> Adolphus, D of Cambridge-> Mary Adelaide, Dchss of Teck-> Alexander
George III-> Edward, D of Kent-> Queen Victoria-> Leopold, D of Albany-> Alice

1913 - Prince Arthur of Connaught and Princess Alexandra, Duchess of Fife, first cousins once removed from Queen Victoria:
Victoria-> Arthur, D of Connaught-> Arthur (never Duke, died before his father)
Victoria-> Edward VII-> Alexandra, Princess Royal-> Alexandra, Dchss of Fife (she was duchess in her own right)

1932 - Prince Gustaf Adolf of Sweden, Duke of Västerbotten and Princess Sibylla of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (her father was born a British prince), parents of Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, second cousins from Queen Victoria:
Victoria-> Arthur, D of Connaught-> Margaret, Crown Princess of Sweden-> Gustaf Adolf
Victoria-> Leopold, D of Albany-> Charles Edward of Albany, D of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha-> Sibylla

1934 - Prince George, Duke of Kent and Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark, second cousins from Christian IX of Denmark:
Christian IX-> Alexandra-> George V of Britain-> George, D of Kent
Christian IX-> George I of Greece -> Nicholas of G and D-> Marina

CarolinaLandgrave 11-17-2008 03:56 PM

Before Queen Victoria, were not the Hanover's full of 1st cousin marriages??

MAfan 11-17-2008 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CarolinaLandgrave (Post 854642)
Before Queen Victoria, were not the Hanover's full of 1st cousin marriages??

Prince William, Duke of Gloucester, and his wife Mary were first cousins; King Friedrich Wilhelm I and his wife Sophia Dorothea of Hannover were first cousins.

magnik 11-17-2008 04:30 PM

No they were from 1 to 5 or 6 cusins.

Queen Victoria's parents were cusins.
George IV nad his wife Karoline cusins
Prince Frederick August and wife Frederike cusins 3 degree
King Wilhelm IV and wife Adelheid cusins
Princess Elizabeth and husband Friedrich VI von Hesse-Homburg cusins
Ernst August I King von Hannover and wife Friederike close cusins
their son King George V nad his wife Marie cusins
Prince Adolphus and wife Augusta von Hesse-Kassel about 2 or 4 degree
theur daughter Augusta and husband Friedrich Wilhelm close cusins
Princess Mary and husband William Frederick von Hannover Duke of Gloucester was a grandson of Friedrich Ludwig Prince of Wales

MAfan 11-18-2008 09:44 AM

Frederick Lewis Prince of Wales - William Henry Duke of Gloucester - William Frederick Duke of Gloucester
Frederick Lewis Prince of Wales - George III - Princess Mary

CarolinaLandgrave 11-18-2008 06:24 PM

Were not George IV and Queen Carolina 1st cousins? Didnt the Duke of Cumberland (who became King of Hanover) marry a Mecklenburg 1st cousin (had already "disposed" of two husbands).
Adolphus and Augusta Cambridge were 2nd/2nd Once Removed, correct?

CarolinaLandgrave 11-18-2008 06:27 PM

Princess Augusta of Cambridge and her husband, the Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz were 1st cousins through the Hesse-Cassel family - but were kin also as descendants of George II ( I think)

CarolinaLandgrave 11-18-2008 09:07 PM

Being a good Southern boy..... I cant say a thing about all the cousins marrying cousins, Russ....
my family is riddled with it!
LOL!

Russophile 11-18-2008 09:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CarolinaLandgrave (Post 855306)
Being a good Southern boy..... I cant say a thing about all the cousins marrying cousins, Russ....
my family is riddled with it!
LOL!

Russo, if you please.
We may be getting some whiskers in our old age but we're not entirely manly--yet!:eek:
Marrying cousins was quite common, and we all know QV popped out a huge brood, but I can say I'm happy it is stopping and that I agree with Prince Philip when Diana injected new genes into the line! :biggrin:

CarolinaLandgrave 11-18-2008 09:54 PM

My Apologies, Russo...
and yes - marrying of cousins was quite common....
two of my great grandparents were double first cousins! hahaha

But in seriousness, the British royal family - had no time at all with the Hapsburgs. The uncle/niece marriages were just gross and cruel.

ysbel 11-18-2008 10:47 PM

The royals married cousins more than us common folk, Mr Landgrave. Had to keep up the royal alliances you know.

EmpressRouge 11-18-2008 11:25 PM

Back in the day when transportation wasn't as advanced, even common folk had a high chance of marrying a cousin, alliance or no alliance. If you lived in a small isolated village (or even a group of towns), you would eventually run of out non-relatives to marry. And given infant mortality, the populations were not as large as they are now. Add to that people did not associate outside of their class, and your pool of potential partners dwindled down even more.

CarolinaLandgrave 11-19-2008 10:52 AM

Empress R - thats exactly what my two grandmothers said - you married the people you saw at church or associated with in the community - and after a generation or two, they were likely related to you. And much like the nobles and royals of Europe (on a smaller scale, per say), the best way to hold on to your property is to marry a family member.

scooter 11-19-2008 04:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ysbel (Post 855334)
The royals married cousins more than us common folk, Mr Landgrave. Had to keep up the royal alliances you know.

Unfortunately all of that inbreeding, while useful for treaties, had a rather disasterous effect on many royal houses. From hemophilia, the hapsburg 'lip', to the many mentally deficient rulers/heirs over the centuries. Combine the inbreeding with the rampant and untreated venereal diseases in the old days and you've got quite a 'Prince'.

CarolinaLandgrave 11-19-2008 06:06 PM

I know! The Hapsburgs especially - its a wonder that any of them could carry out the basic functions of human day to day life!

ysbel 11-19-2008 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scooter (Post 855712)
Unfortunately all of that inbreeding, while useful for treaties, had a rather disasterous effect on many royal houses. From hemophilia, the hapsburg 'lip', to the many mentally deficient rulers/heirs over the centuries. Combine the inbreeding with the rampant and untreated venereal diseases in the old days and you've got quite a 'Prince'.

Most hemophilia is not affected by inbreeding. It takes only one defective gene passed from mother to son to make a hemophiliac. Now if a hemophiliac married his first cousin, a hemophilia-carrier, they could possibly have a hemophiliac daughter but that's so rare, I've never heard of such a case.

The Hapsburg lip wasn't a genetic defect, per se, but a strong dominant facial feature that was passed down from generation to generation. The Hapsburgs courted disaster by marrying uncles to nieces and that causes a whole load of genetic problems.

From what I've read, the risk of birth defects of a child born in a first-cousin marriage is about the same as a woman giving birth to her first child at 40, about a 6% higher chance than the normal population. But marriages from any relations closer than that can cause severe birth defects.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:44 PM.

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014
Jelsoft Enterprises