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zhontella 11-08-2003 01:29 AM

Empress Eugénie, wife of Napoleon III (1826-1920)
 
1 Attachment(s)
Empress Eugénie


Maria Eugénia Ignacia Augustina Palafox de Guzmán Portocarrero y Kirkpatrick, 9th Countess de Teba, aka Eugénia de Montijo (May 5, 1826 - July 1920) was Empress of France (1853-1871).
- Empress Eugénie -

The future and last Empress of France was born in Granada, Spain to Don Cipriano Palafox de Guzmán y Portocarrero, Count de Teba, Count de Montijo, and his half-Scottish, half-Spanish wife, Maria Manuela Kirkpatrick, a daughter of the Scots-born William Kirkpatrick, a naturalized American citizen who became U. S. Consul to Malaga and later operated a wine bar. Her sister, Maria Francisca de Sales, aka Paca, inherited the Montijo title as well as other subsidiary family titles, married the duke of Alba, and died in 1860. According to some sources, Don Cipriano was not the father of his daughters, and rumor had it that Eugenia's father was actually a British diplomat, George William Frederick Villiers (1800-1870), later 4th Earl of Clarendon, who gained fame as British Foreign Secretary.

The Countess de Teba, as Eugénia/Eugénie was known before her marriage, wed Emperor Napoleon III on January 30, 1853, not long after he had been rebuffed in his eager attempts to marry Queen Victoria's teenage niece Princess Adelaide von Hohenlohe-Langenburg. The Teba/Bonaparte union was not a match looked upon with complete delight. According to an article in The Times, "We learn with some amusement that this romantic event in the annals of the French Empire has called forth the strongest opposition, and provoked the utmost irritation. The Imperial family, the Council of Ministers, and even the lower coteries of the palace or its purlieus, all affect to regard this marriage as an amazing humiliation ...." Apparently, a 26-year-old Spanish countess was not considered nearly good enough for a Bonaparte (in any case, evidence suggests that the emperor was probably not even a blood Bonaparte, but the result of one of his mother's extramarital affairs).

As she was educated and very intelligent, Eugénie's husband usually consulted her on important questions, and she acted as Regent during his absences. When the Second Empire was overthrown after France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War (1870-71), the empress and her husband took refuge in England, where she continued to live after his death in 1873.

The former empress died in July 1920 at the age of 94, during a visit to her native Spain, and she is interred in the Imperial Crypt at Saint Michael's Abbey, Farnborough, Hampshire, England, with her husband and her son, the Prince Imperial, who died in 1879 in Africa during battle with Zulu warriors.

Her deposed family's association with England was commemorated when the second daughter of the present Duke of York was named Princess Eugenie.

ILOVEABBA 11-14-2003 08:51 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Another picture of the Empress Eugenie of France (I hope I have,nt already posted this one).

gogm 02-11-2004 01:43 AM

There are several pictures of l’Imperatrice Eugenie de Montijo y Guzman in this thread. A number of good images of her are available on the Web. A set under copyright protection are at:

http://napoleontrois.free.fr/imperatrice-images.htm.

One impressive black and white photo is found at:

http://expositions.bnf.fr/legray/grand/156.htm.

The famous portrait, redone in black and white over and over of her in a straw hat (and always on sale it seems at eBay) is under copyright protection at:

http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org/art_collecti...intings/c4.html.

There is a Winterhalter of her in full court dress with flounced crinoline, pearls, tiara, train, the works; the Winterhalter is at napoleontrois. One of the two Dubufe portraits with that portrait comes close.

Two classics of her as Marie Antoinette and with her Ladies in Waiting are found at CGFA:

http://sunsite.icm.edu.pl/cjackson/w/p-winterh3.htm.

I tried to post these two because the principal of CGFA does not seem to copyright her materials, but each image exceeds the 32k limit.

A fashion afficionado would be enthralled if someone had taken the time to portray her in every one of her gowns. The historical writings about her dress as empress are wonderful and the accounts of her jewelery, such as bodice ornaments, are amazing. If someone can find a good, non-fuzzy, high resolution color version of her in full court dress, I’d like to hear where it can be found. I haven’t found a good one (there are lots of fuzzy ones with poor resolution, but none that are good). For that matter, I'd like to see whatever pictures there are around of her.

She had the taste, beauty, and access to wealth to set the standard! ;)

hillary_nugent 01-24-2005 02:08 AM

sorry but who was Empress Eugenie?

Julia 01-24-2005 02:13 AM

Well, here's a little bio on her from Wikipedia. ;)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empress_Eugenie

Maria Eugenia Ignacia Augustina Palafox de Guzmán Portocarrero y Kirkpatrick, 9th Countess de Teba, aka Eugenia de Montijo (May 5, 1826 - July 11, 1920) was Empress of France (1853-1871).

The last Empress of France was born in Granada, Spain to Don Cipriano Palafox de Guzmán y Portocarrero, Count de Teba, subsequently Count de Montijo, and his half-Scottish, half-Spanish wife, Maria Manuela Kirkpatrick, a daughter of the Scots-born William Kirkpatrick, who became U. S. Consul to Malaga and later operated a wine bar. Her sister, Maria Francisca de Sales, a.k.a. Paca, who inherited the Montijo title as well as other subsidiary family titles, married the Duke of Alba, and died in 1860. According to some sources, Don Cipriano was not the biological father of his daughters, and rumor had it that Eugénie's father was actually a British diplomat, George William Frederick Villiers (1800-1870), later 4th Earl of Clarendon, who gained fame as British Foreign Secretary.

The Countess de Teba, as Eugenia/Eugénie was known before her marriage, was educated in Paris at the fashionable convent of Sacré Cœur, where she received an indelibly Catholic training. When Louis Napoléon became president of the Second Republic she appeared with her mother at the balls given by the prince-president at the Elysée, and it was there that she met the future Emperor Napoléon III, whom she wed on January 30, 1853, not long after he had been rebuffed in his eager attempts to marry Queen Victoria's teenage niece Princess Adelaide von Hohenlohe-Langenburg. In a speech from the throne on January 22 he formally announced his engagement, saying "I have preferred a woman whom I love and respect to a woman unknown to me, with whom an alliance would have had advantages mixed with sacrifices." The love match was looked upon as bourgeois in some British circles; The Times wrote, "We learn with some amusement that this romantic event in the annals of the French Empire has called forth the strongest opposition, and provoked the utmost irritation. The Imperial family, the Council of Ministers, and even the lower coteries of the palace or its purlieus, all affect to regard this marriage as an amazing humiliation..." Apparently, a 26-year-old Spanish countess was not considered nearly good enough for a Bonaparte.

On March 16, 1856, the empress gave birth to a son, Napoléon Eugène, Prince Imperial. By her beauty, elegance and charm of manner she contributed largely to the brilliance of the imperial regime. When she wore the new cage crinolines in 1855, European fashion followed suit, and when she abandoned vast skirts at the end of the 1860s, the silhouette of women's dress followed her again. As she was educated and very intelligent, Eugénie's husband usually consulted her on important questions, and she acted as Regent during his absences, in 1859, 1865 and 1870. Eugénie's influence countered any liberal tendencies in the emperor's policies. She was a staunch defender of papal temporal powers in Italy.

Julia 01-24-2005 02:15 AM

2nd portion of the bio from Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empress_Eugenie

When the Second Empire was overthrown after France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War (1870-71), the empress and her husband took refuge in England, and settled at Chislehurst, Kent. After his death in 1873 she moved to Farnborough, Hampshire and to a villa she built at Cap Martin on the French Riviera, where lived in retirement, abstaining from all interference in French politics.

The former empress died in July 1920 at the age of 94, during a visit to her native Spain, and she is interred in the Imperial Crypt at Saint Michael's Abbey, Farnborough, with her husband and her son, the Prince Imperial, who died in 1879 while fighting in the Zulu War in Africa.

Her deposed family's association with England was commemorated when she became the godmother of the daughter of Princess Beatrice, was born in 1887, Princess Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg, later Queen of Spain. A century later, the second daughter of the present Duke of York, born in 1990, was named Princess Eugenie.

The Empress has also been commemorated in space; the asteroid 45 Eugenia was named after her, and its moon, Petit-Prince, after the Prince Imperial.

Marengo 07-03-2008 08:22 AM

Empress Eugenie:
above, left: Eugenie and her son Napoleon Eugene, by Winterhaller.
above, right: Eugenie by Winterhaller
below: Eugenie and her ladies, by Winterhaller. Eugenie is the lady in white and with the flowers in her hand.

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w...halter-The.jpg http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w...niemontijo.jpg

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w...1/winterh1.jpg

PssMarie-Elisabeth 07-23-2008 10:24 PM

Empress Eugénie by Disderi
http://i35.tinypic.com/t6eyvt.jpg

Marengo 11-07-2008 06:59 PM

A nice portrait by Winterhaller:

http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/d...The_Empres.jpg

gogm 11-08-2008 05:07 PM

Images of the Empress Eugenie
 
For more images of the Empress Eugenie, please see:

Empress Eugenie pictures from fashion photos on webshots

Two of the 80 images follow:
http://inlinethumb51.webshots.com/35...600x600Q85.jpg

and

http://inlinethumb53.webshots.com/23...600x600Q85.jpg

Many of the posted images will expand when you click on these images to enter Webshots (like the first image), and click on the plus sign below the image on Webshots (like the second image).

Russophile 11-08-2008 05:35 PM

There is a book I read in the library that I can't remember the title of that said that Eugenie was an avid shopper. It had all sorts of "first ladies" that were shoppers. Jackie Kennedy was in there as well. I will keep looking. . . .:bang:

Marengo 11-08-2008 06:16 PM

I believe that in her days the shops still came to her, shopping in the way we know it is an invention of the belle epoque I think, when the promenades in Paris and such were constructed. But indeed the Empress was fond of fashion and on all accounts was one of the best dressed women of her times. And added to that she had a marvelous jewelry collection too...

Al_bina 11-08-2008 06:30 PM

Thanks a lot for magnificent pictures of Empress Eugine!:flowers: She was a beautiful lady indeed. I read that Empress Eugine returned outfits a la Madame Pompadour and Marie Antoinette to fashion. She favoured creations by Charles Frederick Worth.
Quote:

... But, undoubtedly, the greatest influence on fashion in the last decades of the nineteenth century was Empress Eugenie's favourite, Charles Frederick Worth, the father of couture. Fashionable women the world over, flocked to Paris to purchase his one-of-a-kind creations. Worth was the first creator of clothing who became internationally reknowned not as simply a maker of clothes but as a designer. From this time on, fashion would move at a pace that required considerable expense to keep up with it. Though the last quarter of the nineteenth century saw a considerable rise in consumerism and the number of people who could indulge in it, fashion would be led by designers as well as socialites. ...
Reference:Fashion In The 1870s And '80s - The Ladies Treasury of Costume and Fashion
Quote:

For fashion historians and designers, the name of Eugenie is inextricably linked with fashion history. Eugenie, with her beautiful blue eyes, red hair, perfect complexion, and tiny feet, was a fashion icon in France in the 1850s and 1860s. Ladies copied her hairstyles and even dyed their hair red. Her name was applied to a myriad fashion styles and accessories.
Reference: The Empress Eugenie and Fashion

Nico 11-08-2008 07:22 PM

Some of my favorite pictures of my dear Empress::franceflag:

By Winterhalter

http://img206.imageshack.us/img206/1...gebiom1.th.pnghttp://img206.imageshack.us/images/thpix.gif

http://img530.imageshack.us/img530/4...5748ve0.th.pnghttp://img530.imageshack.us/images/thpix.gif

http://img528.imageshack.us/img528/7...ie52iw3.th.png

Nico 11-08-2008 07:22 PM

By the Photographer Gustave le Gray

http://img404.imageshack.us/img404/8425/e2ec1.th.pnghttp://img404.imageshack.us/images/thpix.gif

By Mayer et Pierson

http://img143.imageshack.us/img143/6241/mayeraf8.th.pnghttp://img143.imageshack.us/images/thpix.gif

By Dubufe

http://img401.imageshack.us/img401/6...ap25zk5.th.pnghttp://img401.imageshack.us/images/thpix.gif

With the Little Prince

http://img143.imageshack.us/img143/3...p113pm6.th.pnghttp://img143.imageshack.us/images/thpix.gif

With her Imperial husband

http://img507.imageshack.us/img507/6594/2ea11wo4.th.pnghttp://img507.imageshack.us/images/thpix.gif

Al_bina 11-09-2008 11:04 AM

I read that stunning Empress Eugine had a shrew streak ( I mean she nagged her husband a lot), which poisoned relationships between Napoleon III and her. I wonder whether the above is true.

PssMarie-Elisabeth 01-24-2009 03:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Russophile (Post 849569)
There is a book I read in the library that I can't remember the title of that said that Eugenie was an avid shopper.

Empress Eugénie was very fashion conscious and was also into the 'modes' (or fashion trends) of the period. It would not be too surprising if some of the costumes she wore were based on or even, modeled after the dress designs showcased in the French fashion magazine "Le Conseiller des Dames et des Demoiselles".

July 1855
http://i41.tinypic.com/344sd2q.jpg

Russophile 02-03-2009 07:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Russophile (Post 849569)
There is a book I read in the library that I can't remember the title of that said that Eugenie was an avid shopper. It had all sorts of "first ladies" that were shoppers. Jackie Kennedy was in there as well. I will keep looking. . . .:bang:

I found one: The Urge to Splurge, a history of shopping by Laura Byrne Paquet.

magnik 02-08-2009 03:26 PM

What I found about Eugenie on NYPL sites
sketches
NYPL Digital Gallery | Detail ID 1233340

NYPL Digital Gallery | Detail ID 1233332

NYPL Digital Gallery | Detail ID 1233335

NYPL Digital Gallery | Detail ID 1233336

NYPL Digital Gallery | Detail ID 1233366

NYPL Digital Gallery | Detail ID 1233375

http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypld...=20&pos=74&e=w


articles
NYPL Digital Gallery | Detail ID 1233330

NYPL Digital Gallery | Detail ID 1233331

NYPL Digital Gallery | Detail ID 1233368

NYPL Digital Gallery | Detail ID 1233369

PssMarie-Elisabeth 02-10-2009 01:02 PM

Thanks for sharing Magnik ! :smile:


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