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Julia 03-24-2005 01:34 PM

Titles, Legal Status, Precedence and other related matters of the Hohenzollerns
 
Question: if there were to be a king of Germany who would he be? Ernst August of Hannover? Or, would Georg Friedrich be king?

Thanks to you all for the information and photos so far! Great information!

Sue- 03-25-2005 11:26 AM

I just looked for information. But I think the king would come from the Hohenzollern family because in the magazine I have is a little story about them. After the facts Georg Friedrich's father must be king and he would be the Crown prince. Prince Louis Ferdinand (the grandfather of Georg) was the first son of Crown Prince Wilhelm. Wilhelm died 1951 and Louis Ferdinand 1994. But now I don't understand what the difference is between Hohenzollern and Prussia. Well, I hope I could answer to your question. It interests me too, if I have time I will try to find out more or anyone else here maybe could help ;)

hrhcp 03-25-2005 01:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sue-
I just looked for information. But I think the king would come from the Hohenzollern family because in the magazine I have is a little story about them. After the facts Georg Friedrich's father must be king and he would be the Crown prince. Prince Louis Ferdinand (the grandfather of Georg) was the first son of Crown Prince Wilhelm. Wilhelm died 1951 and Louis Ferdinand 1994. But now I don't understand what the difference is between Hohenzollern and Prussia. Well, I hope I could answer to your question. It interests me too, if I have time I will try to find out more or anyone else here maybe could help ;)

THe difference between "Hohenzollern and Prussia" is the same as the difference between "Bush and USA".

Given that:
Bush is the family name, USA is the area they rule.

Thus:
Hohenzollern is the family name. Prussia is the area they ruled.

juliamontague 03-26-2005 01:40 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Julia
Question: if there were to be a king of Germany who would he be? Ernst August of Hannover? Or, would Georg Friedrich be king?

Thanks to you all for the information and photos so far! Great information!

Maybe this can help, it's a family tree of Georg Friedrich.
If we had an Emperor in Germany, he would be.

Julia 03-29-2005 03:27 PM

Thanks, Julia, for posting the family tree! Makes much more sense.

So, if Germany had an emperor or king do our German, and other members, think Georg Friedrich would make a good ruler?

Sue- 03-30-2005 12:21 PM

Yes, why not. He is smart and clever and he is young as well so he would rule much more casual. I think he would do a good job.

Julia 03-30-2005 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sue-
Yes, why not. He is smart and clever and he is young as well so he would rule much more casual. I think he would do a good job.

Since I am not from Germany it's always interesting to hear what our German members have to say about German princes and the like. Are there any particular articles on Georg Frederich which we could find online, or are they mostly newspaper/magazine articles?

Sue- 03-31-2005 04:18 PM

Well, I just looked for online information about him because I very often get information from magazine articles. But I think that there a more reports about Georg Friedrich in the Berliner newspapers because he lives there. I live in the other part of Germany so I only read something in different magazines.
Here what I found, I will look for some more online reports etc. when I have more time.

www.preussen.de (also in English and on top with info about the Hohenzollern family)

Charles 05-15-2005 02:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by juliamontague
Maybe this can help, it's a family tree of Georg Friedrich.
If we had an Emperor in Germany, he would be.

Not only would George Frederick be the German Emperor, he would also be the King of Prussia and Grand Duke of Mecklenburg.

PreDoc 01-29-2006 06:28 PM

A few questions ...
 
Would anybody be kind enough to answer any (or all) of the below?:

1. Is Georg Friedrich's correct formal style "His Royal and Imperial Highness"?

2. How does he earn a living, or does he even have to (i.e. inheritance)?

3. I appreciate the photos that have been posted, can anyone recommend any creative web searches I can conduct to find more?

4. What was the 'three generation' morganatic marriage discussion about up-thread? I mean, is there something statuatory about how he must marry?

Warren 01-30-2006 12:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PreDoc
Would anybody be kind enough to answer any (or all) of the below?:
1. Is Georg Friedrich's correct formal style "His Royal and Imperial Highness"?
2. How does he earn a living, or does he even have to (i.e. inheritance)?
3. I appreciate the photos that have been posted, can anyone recommend any creative web searches I can conduct to find more?
4. What was the 'three generation' morganatic marriage discussion about up-thread? I mean, is there something statuatory about how he must marry?

1. Yes, Georg Friedrich as Head of the House of Hohenzollern is HI&RH.
2. He manages the family business (castles, property, tourism).
4. The Family Laws stipulate the 'equality' of a marriage for dynastic purposes.
German law will only dictate inheritance rights; the State will not get involved in the internal family rules.

PreDoc 01-30-2006 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Warren
The Family Laws stipulate the 'equality' of a marriage for dynastic purposes.
German law will only dictate inheritance rights; the State will not get involved in the internal family rules.

Thanks so much for the response. I'm curious though, if the state dictates inheritance rights, that surely must supersede internal family rules. So does that mean he is free to marry whomever he chooses with no loss to his rights and assets?

Sancia 01-30-2006 04:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PreDoc
Thanks so much for the response. I'm curious though, if the state dictates inheritance rights, that surely must supersede internal family rules. So does that mean he is free to marry whomever he chooses with no loss to his rights and assets?

The loss of a right to a throne does not mean you will not inherit from your family. It's something distinct. So the family internal rules about an hypothetical throne are not to be superseded by inheritance laws.

branchg 01-30-2006 08:21 PM

He is no longer a Royal or Imperial Highness because the noblility is formally abolished in Germany. Legally, he is simply Georg-Friedrich, Prince von Hohenzollern as his surname.

He is granted the courtesy of his rank and title among the European royal houses, but never precedence, as the family no longer reigns. The matter of marriage equality is up to him as the Head of the House and is likely to be abolished given the difficulty of enforcing it in a modern society.

The Hohenzollerns have managed to retain a sizable fortune and invested wisely in the post-war Germany. It is enough for Georg-Friedrich not to worry about his next meal, although I doubt he is truly rich since he must support many other members of his family.

branchg 01-30-2006 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PreDoc
Thanks so much for the response. I'm curious though, if the state dictates inheritance rights, that surely must supersede internal family rules. So does that mean he is free to marry whomever he chooses with no loss to his rights and assets?

He can marry whomever he wishes as Head of the House. Whether the marriage is considered equal or not under the House Rules is totally up to him. He can change the rules anytime he wants to.

winter 02-28-2006 11:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by branchg
He is no longer a Royal or Imperial Highness because the noblility is formally abolished in Germany. Legally, he is simply Georg-Friedrich, Prince von Hohenzollern as his surname.

Nobility may be officially abolished in Germany but most people in society -also politicians- still use titles and grant former nobles special treatment.

Georg Friedrich's legal name is: Georg Friedrich Prinz von Preussen, not von Hohenzollern. And I'm pretty sure there aren't many people who would adress him as "Mr. Prince of Prussia".

princessH-O 03-01-2006 11:52 PM

He is still addressed as Prince of Prussia, at least that is what I have called him when I have met with him. Along with his sister and his mother, very nice people.

Toledo 03-02-2006 01:18 AM

Even when ther is no such thing as Prussia anymore? It's like being Prince of the extinct Kingdom of Neustria and the Kingdom of Austrasia. And for that matter, the also extinct Kingdom of Two Sicilies.

Warren 03-02-2006 01:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Toledo
Even when there is no such thing as Prussia anymore? It's like being Prince of the extinct Kingdom of Neustria and the Kingdom of Austrasia. And for that matter, the also extinct Kingdom of Two Sicilies.

Well, there is no state called 'Prussia' but we're talking titles, not nation-states. Just as 'Wessex' ceased to be an entity at the time of the Norman conquest. Some Luxembourg Princes are Princes of Nassau (and of Bourbon-Parma until 1986); neither state exists today. So what? George Friedrich is 'Prince of Prussia', that's his title. The same goes for the titles of all members of the reigning and Noble families that made up the German and Austrian Empires, and all former reigning royalty.

Toledo 03-02-2006 01:54 AM

I forgot the Wessex title.
For the Prussian my idea is it would be more appropiate as Prince of Germany since that was their highest ranking and also on an established (new) nation.


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