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bct88 04-20-2004 03:41 PM

Does Victoria Smoke?
 
Does C.P. Victoria smoke? I read that she does. Does anyone have images of her smoking? Thanks.

Josefine 04-20-2004 03:45 PM

i have never seen or heared anything about victoria smoking

Robbert 04-20-2004 03:56 PM

I' ve heard that's she smokes too, and madeleine aswell. I don't know if it's true. I know for sure that Jonas smokes, I've seen a picture of him while he was smoking (I believe in Marbella).

bct88 04-20-2004 03:57 PM

Princess Victoria

Has smoked "in real life" (IRL) = Yes
Profession = royalty

Her entry in the Internet Movie Database (IMDb)

Miscellaneous information

Crown Princess of Sweden

Proof she has smoked (or quit) "in real life"

"was mostly sitting smoking - white Prince by the way - and looking thoughtful.", Hent Extra (Sweden), Sep. '98

http://www.smokingsides.com/asfs/V/Victoria.html

I also heard this somewhere else, but this was the only link that I remember.

Lena 04-20-2004 03:57 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Duke@Apr 19th, 2004 - 3:05 pm
Does Crown Princess Victoria hold any honour appointments in the swedish armed forces like all the other Crown Prince/Princess? Do anyone had photo of her in ceremonial uniform?

No, so far she hasnīt...and there also arenīt such pictures published...at least as much as I know...But sheīs still younger than the other crown princes...maybe we will see this later in her life...

Quote:

Does C.P. Victoria smoke? I read that she does. Does anyone have images of her smoking? Thanks.
I guess your source (or the source of people, who have told you this) is this

Thatīs the only source, where it is mentioned, that she should be a smoker... but "Hänt extra" isnīt a reliable source...so I doubt, that sheīs a smoker (her teeth are far too white for being one)...probably she has tried it in her teen years, but has quit it soon...

May I ask you somehing, bct88? Where are you from?
I ask, because mostly Americans ask these smoker or not-smoker-questions...and so Iīm interested/curious.

bct88 04-20-2004 05:08 PM

:lol: Yes, I am an American.

Lena 04-20-2004 06:18 PM

:lol: Ok, thank you...good for my "statistics"
To be honest I often wonder, why so many of you (Americans) ask this? To me it often sounds as if you would judge these people... smoker:bad person, non-smoker: good person :unsure:
I think here in Europe people mind less, if someone smokes or not...itīs just something, which one does. Of course a lot of people (who donīt smoke) donīt want to sit together in the cabin of a train with a chain-smoker, but in general they donīt mind...

Alexandria 04-20-2004 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Lena@Apr 20th, 2004 - 6:18 pm
:lol: Ok, thank you...good for my "statistics"
To be honest I often wonder, why so many of you (Americans) ask this? To me it often sounds as if you would judge these people... smoker:bad person, non-smoker: good person :unsure:
I think here in Europe people mind less, if someone smokes or not...itīs just something, which one does. Of course a lot of people (who donīt smoke) donīt want to sit together in the cabin of a train with a chain-smoker, but in general they donīt mind...

I am not American (gotta go to the Great White North for me!), but as Americans and Canadians share a lot of similar views, here is my thoughts on why Americans tend to ask this question whereas many Europeans don't. From my own experiences, smoking is much more commonplace in Europe, not that it is not commonplace here. But the last time I was in Europe about 3 years ago (France, Spain and Italy), it seemed to me that smoking seemed as essential as drinking water. Everyone everywhere was smoking, and nobody seemed to bat an eye.

But here in Canada, and specifically Ontario where I live, many cities have enacted a "Smoke Free" by law, which means that in practically all public spaces, smoking is not permitted. No smoking in public (government) buildings, shopping malls (though that was years ago), and most recently hard hit were restaurants and bars. Such places had to declare themselves a restaurant--meaning places which allowed people under 19 (19 is the legal age at which one can buy cigarettes here in Ontario) but smoking was not allowed, or a bar--no one under 19 is allowed but smoking is permitted.

I did not watch any television in Europe so I do not know what the media campaign against smoking is like there, but here in Canada, the government has spent millions of dollars targeted at teenagers to discourage them to start smoking in the first place, and adults who already smoke to quit.

In the (at least) last 6-8 years I would stay that there has been a very conscious effort to discourage smoking and to warn the public about all the negative aspects of smoking, such as premature aging, wrinkles, yellow teeth, and of course, lung cancer. But also there is a tremendous campaign against second hand smoking being a killer.

In my view, all these public efforts have made Canadians a very conscious lot about smoking. (Among the first 10 questions I would say I ask--or get asked--on a date is: Do you smoke.)

(Does it matter or make a difference if I had a postscript that I do not smoke? I am actually allergic to smoke, but even if I weren't it would not be a habit I would pick up.)

Dennism 04-20-2004 08:26 PM

Alexandria is right about all of this. Very much a big thing here in North America. Campaign against smoking is a very big deal especially among the young and there are campaigns against it on TV or in the movies and in advertisments. And now recently, Ireland has banned smoking in public places as well. Bravo to them.

Robbert 04-21-2004 06:29 AM

Here in Nederland it is forbidden to smoke in public places too. I think it's bullsh*t, if you don't want to smoke than don't get a seat next to a smoker. I think it's a good thing to have seperate rooms for smokers but to forbid it everywhere goes to far for me.

Yennie 04-21-2004 09:54 AM

Iīm sure Victoria tested when she was a teenager. Its very common, so imo its not a big deal. As far as I know there is no picture of her smoking so Iīm sure she never was a "regular".

Britters 04-21-2004 01:00 PM

I wouldn't be surprised if Victoria and Madeleine aren't social smokers...only because smoking is a "big" thing in Europe. I've never seen or heard anything until now to suggest that Madeleine and Victoria smoke regularly, however in social gatherings, where a mojority of the people around you are smoking one tends to pick up the habit just a social habit.

I would also agree with Alexandria and Dennism...people in the US are boradsided daily with the media campaigns to discourage smoking. In those campaigns one of the underlying stigmas (whether it is meant or not) is that people who smoke are "bad" and in turn society tends to look down or poorly on those who make the personal choice to smoke. In Europe...the many times I've visited (my younger sister goes to school in England), smoking isn't even thought twice about as a general rule. In fact my grandparents buy cartons of Marlboros when they travel to Europe simply because they are fantastic barganing tools with Europeans...

Also American cigarettes are slightly more potent then European, so it's almost as though smoking in Europe isn't as unhealthy...although it is unhealthy, it's not quite as bad as the cigarettes smoked in the States.

mixer2002de 04-21-2004 02:22 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Britters@Apr 21st, 2004 - 12:00 pm
Also American cigarettes are slightly more potent then European, so it's almost as though smoking in Europe isn't as unhealthy...although it is unhealthy, it's not quite as bad as the cigarettes smoked in the States.
Yeah, just a little bit of attacking your non somkeing neigbours health is not that dramatic. :angry:

Public smokers are criminals damaging everybody elses health and when they get ill the public health system has to pay for them this is nonsense. Smoking in public places and next to children should be forbidden and be heavily fined. :angry: :angry:

Yes I im German, unfortunatley you have to accept your health beeing damaged when you go out. This is *****!

*Expletive edited by administrator.*

Britters 04-21-2004 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by mixer2002de+Apr 21st, 2004 - 1:22 pm--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (mixer2002de @ Apr 21st, 2004 - 1:22 pm)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-Britters@Apr 21st, 2004 - 12:00 pm
Also American cigarettes are slightly more potent then European, so it&#39;s almost as though smoking in Europe isn&#39;t as unhealthy...although it is unhealthy, it&#39;s not quite as bad as the cigarettes smoked in the States.
Yeah, just a little bit of attacking your non somkeing neigbours health is not that dramatic. :angry:

Public smokers are criminals damaging everybody elses health and when they get ill the public health system has to pay for them this is nonsense. Smoking in public places and next to children should be forbidden and be heavily fined. :angry: :angry:

Yes I im German, unfortunatley you have to accept your health beeing damaged when you go out. This is bull****&#33; [/b][/quote]
[QUOTE]

I take a bit of offense at this as I do smoke, and make sure that I am in designated smoking areas before I even think about liting up a cigarette. Smoking is a personal choice, and while you&#39;re right, it does cause health problems in others, most smokers are careful (at least the ones I have been around) to be in desginated areas, and their are generally no children around when I smoke...

As I said it&#39;s a personal choice, and if you don&#39;t like it, don&#39;t go somewhere where smoking is allowed...I realize in Europe there are very few smoke free area&#39;s, but they do exist.

mixer2002de 04-21-2004 05:02 PM

Quote:


I am in designated smoking areas before I even think about liting up a cigarette.

Maybe thats like it is America. Their they have got spacial smoking areas. You are American. am i right?

Quote:


As I said it&#39;s a personal choice, and if you don&#39;t like it, don&#39;t go somewhere where smoking is allowed...I realize in Europe there are very few smoke free area&#39;s, but they do exist.

As long as you personally ruin your own health its your problem.

But in Germany their are no special smoking or non smoking areas and if so smokers do not care.

These drug addicts smoke everywhere without beeing fined. In public buildings, in University buildings, in shared offices and even in hospitals. And when you say you DO mind they behave like YOU would pollute the air. Even when you are in a so called non smoking area.

So smokers for me are rude impolite drug addicts, tolerated by law.

A special area wher they could ruin their own life would be o.k. But beeing forced to share your day and the smoke with them is totally evil.

Lena 04-21-2004 06:19 PM

Ehm, I live in Austria...and of course Iīve been many times in Germany (my parents live close to the border)...but I never had the feeling, that there were many smokers, which didnīt follow the rules&#33; I was never in a hospital (and Iīm as a medical student in a lot of hospitals), where people smoked outside the marked areas (and these areas always were far away from the non-smoker-areas...e.g. own smoking-rooms or outside of the hospital at balconies). I also donīt get in touch with smokers in public transport (in the tube/tram it isnīt allowed and in trains are special areas for smokers). Actually I only get in touch with smokers in restaurants and bars (but in restaurants are mostly smoker and non-smoker-areas too...but I admit the distance isnīt as long as in public buildings with these areas). And though Iīm a non-smoker, and though I try to persuade friends/relatives to stop (for their health), and though itīs strange to me, that a lot of my fellow students (the lung specialists of tomorrow?) smoke, and though I think itīs unfair that smokers pay the same for their health-insurance as non-smokers, I believe that this little smoke in the air donīt kill any non-smoker (at least not more than the exhaust gases of cars)&#33;
Live and let them live...the non-smokers let me...I really seldom meet impolite smokers, who donīt ask, if I would mind...or who smoke in the near of children/ in not marked areas&#33;

mixer2002de 04-21-2004 06:46 PM

Maybe I do have bad luck and just get in touch with "bad" smokers, anyway i do not see why it should be tolerated in public anywhere.

Alexandria 04-21-2004 07:00 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Britters@Apr 21st, 2004 - 1:00 pm
Also American cigarettes are slightly more potent then European, so it&#39;s almost as though smoking in Europe isn&#39;t as unhealthy...although it is unhealthy, it&#39;s not quite as bad as the cigarettes smoked in the States.
I don&#39;t particularly agree with this comment. Smoking, and the side effects that come with it (lung cancer, yellow teeth, pre-mature aging, etc.) go hand in hand and are unhealthy, period, no matter the "potency" of cigarettes.

Who is to say that two individuals who start smoking at the same time and both smoke for 10 years each the same amount of cigarettes per day over this time span, that the individual who has smoked "less potent" European cigarettes might not be diagnosed with lung cancer before the American who is smoking "more potent" cigarettes?

Smoking is a personal choice, yes, but I disagree about Europen cigarettes being the lesser of the two evils because they are less potent.

Britters 04-21-2004 07:10 PM

I&#39;m not saying they don&#39;t have the same side effects, but in the reports I&#39;ve seen European cigarettes are less potent and it takes more of them to create the same side effects as American cigarettes...

However, it has been my experience that because smoking is tolerated so much more in most European countries the people who do smoke, smoke more often...therefore the side effects are the same...they smoke more, they get cancers...American&#39;s smoke fewer more potent cigarettes and viola...same results.

Alexandria 04-21-2004 07:20 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Britters@Apr 21st, 2004 - 7:10 pm
I&#39;m not saying they don&#39;t have the same side effects, but in the reports I&#39;ve seen European cigarettes are less potent and it takes more of them to create the same side effects as American cigarettes...

However, it has been my experience that because smoking is tolerated so much more in most European countries the people who do smoke, smoke more often...therefore the side effects are the same...they smoke more, they get cancers...American&#39;s smoke fewer more potent cigarettes and viola...same results.

I am not saying that I think you are wrong, Britters, but I just don&#39;t believe that because European cigarettes are less potent than American cigarettes they are "less unhealthy." I would really need to see a solid medical report to believe this.

To me, smoking is smoking, no matter how potent the cigarettes or how many you smoke. And with smoking comes the negative side effects, period. Just because one smokes fewer cigarettes than others or smokes less potent cigarettes than others does not mean that they are less affected by the repercussions of smoking. It is like being "a little bit pregnant." You are pregnant or you aren&#39;t; you smoke or don&#39;t smoke--no differentiation between how much or how potent the cigarettes.


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