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Cordonez 06-25-2007 10:50 PM

Unusual royal traditions or practices
 
I was recently reading a book (forgive me I don't recall which one) that stated that Charles and Diana had followed the royal tradition of leaving their children 'unshod' until they could walk. I was intrigued and went searching for photos of William and Harry without socks or shoes. I have found several but this one seems to bring it home very strongly because they are dressed very warmly but William is barefoot!

http://www.theroyalforums.com/forums...2&d=1102497288

Does anyone know of any other unusual or out of the ordinary traditions or practices of the royal families?

lyndaW 06-26-2007 01:03 PM

I had posted (a while back) "Babies Napping In the Cold" and got a bunch of replies. It is common to have your baby take its nap outside (dressed warmly of course) in many countries, Denmark included, also in several of the colder parts of the USA. I thought it strange at the time until I started thinking how much better " I " sleep when its cold in the room, and not all stuffy.

Little_star 06-26-2007 02:43 PM

I have no idea if it is an official tradition or protocol measure but I have noted that often on visits to Jordan foreign dignitaries visit the grave of King Hussein to pay their respects.

bbb 06-26-2007 02:59 PM

i think its unusual that in Denmark they don't reveal the name until the baptism. but it makes for a great guess the name thread :)
i have never heard of the "children 'unshod' until they could walk" theory- very interesting Cordonez thanks

Cordonez 06-30-2007 01:50 AM

I think a lot of the 'unusual' traditions started back with Queen Victoria. I have always found them interesting and sometimes a little strange. One of the things that I have found intriguing in my reading of the royal family is the way that they give gifts to their servants during Christmas. If I understand correctly the servant is given some money, they go get the gift they want, wrap it and then their royal employer hands it to them during the Christmas party. Wouldn't that be an easy way to make sure people get what they want :).

Vanesa 06-30-2007 08:31 PM

Well..this is not a "Royal Tradition", but I find it odd enough to post it here, for Royals are not out of it.

It's referred to the Christening ceremony in Orthodox ritual. It seems that the parents cannot be present at the moment their children are getting Christened. They must even remain out of the Church. I read it in the book "Nicholas and Alexandra", by Robert K. Massie when the author was depicting Tsarevich's Alexei's Christening...

Vanesa.:ermm:

RoyalProtocol 07-03-2007 06:28 AM

The traditions surrounding The Queen are quite starage: Swan Upping etc.

crisiñaki 07-03-2007 08:53 PM

How about bringing water from the Jordan River to christening the little ones?:rolleyes:

Cordonez 07-03-2007 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoyalProtocol (Post 635570)
The traditions surrounding The Queen are quite starage: Swan Upping etc.

Thank you for that information - forgive my ignorance, what is this?

Thanks

Avalon 07-03-2007 09:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vanesa (Post 634030)
Well..this is not a "Royal Tradition", but I find it odd enough to post it here, for Royals are not out of it.

It's referred to the Christening ceremony in Orthodox ritual. It seems that the parents cannot be present at the moment their children are getting Christened. They must even remain out of the Church. I read it in the book "Nicholas and Alexandra", by Robert K. Massie when the author was depicting Tsarevich's Alexei's Christening...

Vanesa.:ermm:

Thanks for letting us know about this tradition Vanesa. :flowers:
Although I don't think this is the case for all Orthodox Churches - I belong to Armenian Apostolic Church (which is also a branch of Orthodox Church) and my parents were present at my christening, I've asked them. ;) So were the parents of all those people, whose Christening I had attended.
And I'm not sure this is the case with all Russian christenings as well - I have attended quite a few of them and parents were always present.

Maybe it is Orthodox tradition for Royal Christenings?

Marengo 07-04-2007 04:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoyalProtocol (Post 635570)
The traditions surrounding The Queen are quite starage: Swan Upping etc.

Which Queen do you mean?

BeatrixFan 07-04-2007 04:24 AM

Swan Upping happens yearly. It's where all the Swans on the Thames are caught and marked as belonging to the Queen because she owns them. They are her swans. Similarly, she owns any whales that are washed up on any of her beaches. Though we don't have whale upping.

Skydragon 07-04-2007 06:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cordonez (Post 633693)
If I understand correctly the servant is given some money, they go get the gift they want, wrap it and then their royal employer hands it to them during the Christmas party. Wouldn't that be an easy way to make sure people get what they want :).

They do give 'personal' presents to valued staff.

It would certainly save the queues after christmas, trying to return unwanted gifts, although it would also mean the charity shops would not get their post holiday bonus either. :rofl:

RoyalProtocol 07-04-2007 07:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marengo (Post 636009)
Which Queen do you mean?

My apologies, I am referring to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, living in the UK one presumes (unfairly) that The Queen generally refers to our Sovereign Lady.

Duchess 07-04-2007 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cordonez (Post 633693)
I think a lot of the 'unusual' traditions started back with Queen Victoria. I have always found them interesting and sometimes a little strange. One of the things that I have found intriguing in my reading of the royal family is the way that they give gifts to their servants during Christmas. If I understand correctly the servant is given some money, they go get the gift they want, wrap it and then their royal employer hands it to them during the Christmas party. Wouldn't that be an easy way to make sure people get what they want :).


anything i've ever read on the gift-giving to the servants (i've only ever read about how Queen Elizabeth has done this) has said that a selection of gifts are brought around for her to choose from. not sure what happens after that but i would assume the retailer would take them and have wrapped and then delivered to HM for her to give at the annual staff xmas celebration.

Cordonez 07-06-2007 03:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Duchess (Post 636115)
anything i've ever read on the gift-giving to the servants (i've only ever read about how Queen Elizabeth has done this) has said that a selection of gifts are brought around for her to choose from. not sure what happens after that but i would assume the retailer would take them and have wrapped and then delivered to HM for her to give at the annual staff xmas celebration.

Certainly would make Christmas more relaxing to be that way:lol:! I think that there are probably at lot of 'unusual' traditions surrounding Christmas. I read also that they always play charades at Christmas time, don't they spend the holidays at Balmoral? I know that I have some things that my family does at Christmas every year, don't really know why, just always have. Probably the same in the royal family too:smile:.

Quote:

Originally Posted by BeatrixFan (Post 636013)
Swan Upping happens yearly. It's where all the Swans on the Thames are caught and marked as belonging to the Queen because she owns them. They are her swans. Similarly, she owns any whales that are washed up on any of her beaches. Though we don't have whale upping.

This made me laugh so hard:rofl:.. I just had this picture of them trying to pick up a whale to put a mark on their behind that says, I belong to Elizabeth, LOL!

And why only the ones that are washed up? That means they are dead, right? Why not the live ones. I don't know why but this is striking me as so FUNNY!:rofl:

Vanesa 07-07-2007 01:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Avalon (Post 635907)
Thanks for letting us know about this tradition Vanesa. :flowers:
Although I don't think this is the case for all Orthodox Churches - I belong to Armenian Apostolic Church (which is also a branch of Orthodox Church) and my parents were present at my christening, I've asked them. ;) So were the parents of all those people, whose Christening I had attended.
And I'm not sure this is the case with all Russian christenings as well - I have attended quite a few of them and parents were always present.

Maybe it is Orthodox tradition for Royal Christenings?

Mmmhh. I don't really know. The granny of a friend of mine who was Russian Orthodox was Christened whithout her parents being present at the ceremony, but she was Christened with her parents holding her...So, maybe there were reforms at some Orthodox Churchs? Any Russian Orthodox there to help with this topic?

Vanesa.

bct88 07-07-2007 09:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cordonez (Post 637313)
Certainly would make Christmas more relaxing to be that way:lol:! I think that there are probably at lot of 'unusual' traditions surrounding Christmas. I read also that they always play charades at Christmas time, don't they spend the holidays at Balmoral? I know that I have some things that my family does at Christmas every year, don't really know why, just always have. Probably the same in the royal family too:smile:.

Christmas is spent at Sandringham, which is in Norfolk. Balmoral, in Scotland, is where they go in the summer.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cordonez (Post 637313)
This made me laugh so hard:rofl:.. I just had this picture of them trying to pick up a whale to put a mark on their behind that says, I belong to Elizabeth, LOL!

And why only the ones that are washed up? That means they are dead, right? Why not the live ones. I don't know why but this is striking me as so FUNNY!:rofl:

I always thought that it included all fish in the sea within a certain distance from the shore. I am not sure about this, so hopefully someone can clarify.

sgl 01-19-2008 04:49 PM

if this includes all of the fish in the sea, how does this work with the fishing industry?

crownprincessrhey 04-25-2009 11:37 AM

I find the idea of making staff buy their own gift and wrapping them to give on another time as funny..why not just give the money.


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