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-   -   Princess Helena (1846-1923) and Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein (1831-1917) (http://www.theroyalforums.com/forums/f165/princess-helena-1846-1923-and-prince-christian-of-schleswig-holstein-1831-1917-a-10755.html)

Daniela 09-07-2006 05:13 AM

Princess Helena (1846-1923) and Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein (1831-1917)
 
http://worldroots.com/brigitte/gifs6...tain1846-2.jpg
Princess Helena with her younger sister Princess Louise

http://worldroots.com/brigitte/gifs6...ritain1846.jpg
http://worldroots.com/brigitte/gifs6...tain1846-3.jpg
http://worldroots.com/brigitte/gifs6...tain1846-4.jpg
http://worldroots.com/brigitte/gifs6...tain1846-7.jpg
Princess Helena

http://worldroots.com/brigitte/gifs6...tain1846-5.jpg
http://worldroots.com/brigitte/gifs6...tain1846-6.jpg
Princess Helena with spouse Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein

And her biography:
http://www.geocities.com/jesusib/Helena.html


Daniela

Furienna 10-23-2006 09:05 PM

Is this the same princess, who was nick-named Lenchen? A daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince consort Albert?

Toledo 10-23-2006 09:12 PM

You are right, I did a quick search Lenchen + Queen Victoria and found it was her nickname indeed.

Furienna 10-23-2006 09:14 PM

I recently read about one of those sisters being named Helena and nick-named Lenchen. Lenchen would be a German nick form for Helena. Victoria and Albert spoke German with each other and with their children, so the Brittish royal family was practically German at the time!

auntie 10-24-2006 08:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Furienna
I recently read about one of those sisters being named Helena and nick-named Lenchen. Lenchen would be a German nick form for Helena. Victoria and Albert spoke German with each other and with their children, so the Brittish royal family was practically German at the time!

Yes, so much in fact, that the rest of the British aristocracy called them "those Germans" It only stopped when George V and Mary who tried to bring up their children and marry them off as Englishly as possible!

magnik 10-24-2006 08:57 AM

Helena's genealogy
http://geneweb.inria.fr/roglo?lang=en;i=116325


Few other photos of Queen Victoria's family!
http://www.btinternet.com/~sbishop100/

auntie 10-24-2006 09:09 AM

I don't know about any of you, but the Victorian era seems like such a deppresing time to live in!

Amy 10-24-2006 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by auntie
I don't know about any of you, but the Victorian era seems like such a deppresing time to live in!

I think it was probably only depressing if you were poor. People who weren't poor had a wonderful time.

Furienna 10-24-2006 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by auntie
Yes, so much in fact, that the rest of the British aristocracy called them "those Germans" It only stopped when George V and Mary who tried to bring up their children and marry them off as Englishly as possible!

It didn't even start with Edward VII and Alexandra? Alexandra was Danish after all, not German? But then her parents were German, so who knows? But of course, George VI, who was George V:s and Mary's son, did get married to Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, a Scottish aristocrat.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amy
I think it was probably only depressing if you were poor. People who weren't poor had a wonderful time.

Your economy doesn't determine if you're happy or not. There will always be poor people, who are happier than some rich people. And I wonder how happy the princes and princesses of this era really were.

Jo of Palatine 10-25-2006 04:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amy
I think it was probably only depressing if you were poor. People who weren't poor had a wonderful time.

People were very restricted and ruled by very strict norms of behaviour. It was either to suppress all your individual ideas or to be socially ostracized. You lived within your small social circle and you abided by the fixed rules and it was a boring life in which one wrong step could ruin all. In order to create the right people for this kind of life you had to start to train your children early on and with extreme consequence. Books about childrens education during this time are books about torture - believe me. And the worst was thast there was not even the idea that something could be wrong with this lifestyle. It gives me the creeps just to think about it.

auntie 10-29-2006 06:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Furienna
It didn't even start with Edward VII and Alexandra? Alexandra was Danish after all, not German? But then her parents were German, so who knows? But of course, George VI, who was George V:s and Mary's son, did get married to Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, a Scottish aristocrat.

It probably started much before, when the Hannover family became monarchs in England!

Lindy 10-29-2006 09:49 AM

Is this the women that Princess Eugenie was named after? (Eugenie Victoria Helena) How is the name Helena pronounced? Is the accent on the first or second syllable?

Furienna 10-29-2006 03:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by auntie
It probably started much before, when the Hannover family became monarchs in England!

I meant that they stopped talking German with the children even though they were Brittish.

Furienna 10-29-2006 10:08 PM

A picture of Helena and her husband.
http://img207.imageshack.us/img207/8...in18465ze9.jpg

Avareenah 10-29-2006 10:14 PM

Helena and Christian's marriage was an arranged one, which many of the family were against, but it proved to be a happy union, with four children.

Helena and Christian were the only members of Queen Victoria's immediate family to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary.

Furienna 10-29-2006 10:20 PM

I guess King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra would have too, if only Edward had gotten to live some years longer. But still, celebrating your 50th wedding anniversary has always been an achievement.

Iluvbertie 10-30-2006 03:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Avareenah
Helena and Christian's marriage was an arranged one, which many of the family were against, but it proved to be a happy union, with four children.

Helena and Christian were the only members of Queen Victoria's immediate family to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary.

I always get a tingle when reading about their 50th wedding anniversary because their nephew sent them a telegram - so what you say!! He was the Kaiser and the anniversary was during World War One - even in the middle of a war with Britain he still managed to remember his British aunt and her husband and get a congratulatory telegram to them.

Avareenah 10-30-2006 03:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Furienna
I guess King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra would have too, if only Edward had gotten to live some years longer. But still, celebrating your 50th wedding anniversary has always been an achievement.

It is, yes, but I feel if Edward had lived long enough to celebrate his and Alexandra's Golden Wedding anniversary, it would have been somewhat of a hollow celebration, given the number of liaisons he had during his marriage, whereas Lenchen and Christian really seemed content together!

Avareenah 10-30-2006 03:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrissy57
I always get a tingle when reading about their 50th wedding anniversary because their nephew sent them a telegram - so what you say!! He was the Kaiser and the anniversary was during World War One - even in the middle of a war with Britain he still managed to remember his British aunt and her husband and get a congratulatory telegram to them.

Yes, amazing! That was one of the strange ways about Wilhelm II. He could be capable of great kindness while being almost brutal in his dealings with some -- his own family members too. :sad:

Furienna 10-30-2006 07:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrissy57
I always get a tingle when reading about their 50th wedding anniversary because their nephew sent them a telegram - so what you say!! He was the Kaiser and the anniversary was during World War One - even in the middle of a war with Britain he still managed to remember his British aunt and her husband and get a congratulatory telegram to them.

Well, I still don't think the Kaiser had any reason to be ashamed of his mother being a Brittish princess. Britain was mightier than Germany, and Queen Victoria was still very much remembered. I think the Kaiser had every reason to be proud of having her as his grandmother. And his mother Victoria had probably taught him to appreciate his Brittish relations. So I don't see anything strange with the Kaiser sending a telegram to his Brittish aunt.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Avareenah
It is, yes, but I feel if Edward had lived long enough to celebrate his and Alexandra's Golden Wedding anniversary, it would have been somewhat of a hollow celebration, given the number of liaisons he had during his marriage, whereas Lenchen and Christian really seemed content together!

Even with the infidelity, it would have been a 50th anniversary of a king's and queen's wedding, so I don't think it would be too hollow. Maybe between Edward and Alexandra, but not officially.


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