The Royal Forums Coat of Arms

Go Back   The Royal Forums > Royal Highlights > Royal House of Fashion > Royal Style File

Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #21  
Old 01-29-2005, 02:44 AM
Monalisa's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Namur, Belgium
Posts: 747
Agneta Fisher in Dress with Moroccan Tulle Skirt
Lgende d'origine: Agneta Fischer wearing white marocain dress with black tulle skirt, by Callot Soeurs, and short white gloves.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	agenta fisher.JPG
Views:	126
Size:	19.7 KB
ID:	86093  
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01-29-2005, 02:50 AM
Monalisa's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Namur, Belgium
Posts: 747
1-Woman in Lelong Gown with Shirred Skirt in moroccan crepe
Lgende d'origine: Woman wearing a crepe marocain dress with a draped bodice and shirred skirt front by Lelong.



2-Four Women in Designer Dresses and Capes Under Awning in moroccan crepe
Lgende d'origine: Four women under canopy at a building entrance, wearing: a pale green flecked crepe marocain frock, with white pique collar and flower, and attached shoulder cape, by Berthe; a blue and white pin-dotted crepe de Chine dress and cape with plain blue lining, by Goupy; a sleeveless black crepe de Chine dres with cape jacket and long sash ties, by Mirande; a navy crepe dress and cape lined with matching polka-dotted silk, by Goupy.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	crepe marocain1.JPG
Views:	74
Size:	21.4 KB
ID:	86094   Click image for larger version

Name:	crepe marocain2.JPG
Views:	70
Size:	46.9 KB
ID:	86095  
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 01-29-2005, 02:57 AM
Monalisa's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Namur, Belgium
Posts: 747
1&2-Behind the Scenes at Maxim's
Models wear creations by young Moroccan designers Meryam Slimani and Magda Ademe and wait to go on stage for the "Bal des Sultans" evening organized by Cyril Le Grix.


3-Behind the Scenes at Maxim's
A model poses with a creation by young Moroccan designers Meryam Slimani and Magda Ademe for the "Bal des Sultans" evening organized by Cyril Le Grix
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	meryem slimani.JPG
Views:	183
Size:	46.6 KB
ID:	86096   Click image for larger version

Name:	meryem slimani&magda adem.JPG
Views:	106
Size:	35.3 KB
ID:	86097   Click image for larger version

Name:	meryemslimani+magda adem.JPG
Views:	175
Size:	49.0 KB
ID:	86098  
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 01-29-2005, 03:35 AM
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 888
I like this thread thanks for created it Monalisa.
The traditional clothes of Marrocan are very interesting and colourful....
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 01-29-2005, 05:54 AM
abir's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: , Canada
Posts: 467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monalisa
Thanks abir for the nice pictures of the circassian dresses and the informations.


I don't exclue that the moroccan traditionnal dresses got many influences from other cultures,but the thing which does from it what they are now is the specificity of the moroccan culture,so you can't find the same dresses in the closer countries for example algeria or tunisia,the "takchitas" are a specificity for morocco.
You are welcome Monalisa.

Yes, it does exist kaftans similar to Moroccan dress. Maybe the word Kaftan is used in Arab countries (also circassian, turkish ... ) but the details of the dress itself was used in different cultures in Asia, Middle East and Africa. The Kaftan is defined as "a long loose piece of clothing, usually with a belt at the waist, worn by men in Arab countries, a woman's long loose dress with long wide sleeves".

So apart from the actual influence of the "Moroccan dress" on fashion, I wouldn't consider it's the only inspiration of the designers, since embroidery, sleeves, edges of the kaftan have long history, and still used in different costumes in the world, so it's not unique of the Moroccan dress.

Embroidery

Embroidery and most other fiber and needlework arts are believed to originate in Asia and the Middle East. Embroidery and the embellishment of clothing is certainly a time consuming practice which necessitates that there be actual time to do it. For groups of humans living in marginal areas, subsistence would take precedence over leisure activities. For humans living in areas in which subsistence was much easier, there was time to develop the art. Initially, it may have all started as a way to enhance and, at the same time strengthen seams.

In 1964, a Cro-Magnon hunter's fossilized remains were found at a dig in Sungir near Vladimir, Russia, dating to 30,000 B.C. His fur clothing, boots and hat were heavily decorated with hand stitched horizontal rows of ivory beads. This example would seem to indicate that the idea of couching; whether it was bits of something or a cord of some type, has been around for at least as long as embroidery itself.

Chinese bead embroidery in Siberia, dating from between 5000 and 6000 B.C., include elaborately drilled shells stitched with decorative designs onto animal hides. Mosaics of Byzantium, 500 A.D., depict embroidery of clothing with silk thread, precious stones and pearls. It is possible the Chinese thread embroidery from 3500 B.C. was the origin of thread embroidery, as we know it today. Historical documents record the use of embroidery in China as early as 2255 B.C.

...

from http://www.vertetsable.com/demos_bigfive.htm
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 01-29-2005, 06:07 AM
abir's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: , Canada
Posts: 467
About edges on the Kaftan ... and inspiration of Moroccan dress with edges ans slits & Nicole Kidman dress in post #12.



Caftan, 8th10th century
Caucasus Mountain regions
Silk, linen, and fur; Coat: H. 56 in. (142.2 cm), W. 60 in. (152.4 cm); Leggings: H. 32 in. (81.3 cm)
Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1996 (1996.78.1)

The original linen coat (caftan), preserved in part from the neck to the bottom of the hem, is made of finely woven linen. A decorative strip of large-patterned silk is sewn along the exterior and interior edges of the caftan. A minute fragment of lambskin preserved as the caftan's interior attests to its fur lining. The woven patterns on the silk borders of the caftan include motifs such as the rosettes and stylized animal patterns enclosed within beaded roundels, which were widespread in Iranian and Central Asian textiles of the sixth to ninth century. The colors used in the textile include a now-faded dark blue, yellow, red, and white on a dark brown ground. The decorated silk fabrics are a compound twill weave (samit in modern classification) and the body of the garment is plain-weave linen. Two slits running up the back of the caftan make it particularly suitable as a riding costume.

From http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/ho/06/..._1996.78.1.htm

and http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/ho/06/..._1996.78.1.htm
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	hb_1996.78.1[1].jpg
Views:	104
Size:	106.3 KB
ID:	86099  
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 01-29-2005, 06:34 AM
abir's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: , Canada
Posts: 467
What I found till now are pictures from Musuems or detailed descriptions of how was the Kaftan in some regions in Middle East/Asia.

I wonder how was the Moroccan dress decades ago so that we can compare it with Ottoman/Caucasus/Circassian Kaftan. That could be interesting.



Ottoman Kaftan (entari)
  • Caftans of various styles were the main item of dress for both men and women.
  • Caftans are fairly simple in construction and tailoring, using mostly straight seams; it was the quality of the fabric that was intended to impress (although the majority of surviving caftans are of plain material).
  • They generally have round necks, sometimes with a small stand-up collar.
  • Womens caftans likewise had round necks: styles that had low round or square necklines or even came under the bust date to the late 18th century. 16th century caftans did not expose the bosom.
  • They usually have buttons to the waist, either jewelled or covered in the same fabric as the caftan. The buttons fastened through loops rather than buttonholes, often attached to frogging in braid or similar fabric across the chest. This frogging seems to be more prevalent on mens garments than womens, although it found on caftans of both genders.
  • Caftans were usually three-quarter to full length, although shorter knee length caftans were worn for sport or battle.
  • Women also wore a shorter hip to thigh length caftan called a hirka under or sometimes over a full-length caftan.
  • Sleeves were short, wrist or ankle length. Short sleeves came to the elbow, with a curved cutout in front where the arm would bend. Wrist length sleeves extended just past the fingertips, and were worn bunched up at the wrist and fastened tightly with buttons (This type of sleeve could also be detachable, to mix and match with short-sleeved caftans). Ankle length sleeves were purely decorative, falling empty behind and worn only on the outer garment.
  • The sultan and his court would frequently wear three caftans: one with wrist length sleeves under another with short sleeves, under another with decorative ankle length sleeves, so their contrasting fabrics could all be seen and admired.
  • Women tended to wear wrist length sleeves, with short sleeves only on the outer garment. They did not seem to wear ankle length sleeves at all. (Early 17th century illustrations depict women with decorative flared turned-back cuffs, which be easily achieved by buttoning the sleeve differently at the wrist; it seems likely this was also a 16th century practice.) Sleeves split all the way to the elbow and hanging open did not come into fashion until the 18th century.
  • Womens caftans did not seem to have the overlapping triangular front gores of the mens caftans: however, these gores are present on a surviving outer caftan from the Topkapi Saray Museum.
  • Womens caftans seem to have been tailored quite close to the body. Several 17th century illustrations depict caftans being worn fastened with only every third or fourth button, so as to gape open and show off the fabric of the hirka underneath; it is probable this was also a 16th century practice.
Fabrics
  • Fabrics ranged from light silks, satins and cottons to sumptuous polychrome silks and gold threaded brocades to Italian style velvets and velvet brocades, the more colourful the better (dark or sombre colours were uncommon).
  • Solid colours, moir, subtle jacquard patterns, triplet spots, stylised tiger stripes, ogival designs and especially naturalistic and stylised floral patterns were all popular. Checks and stripes are almost never seen.
  • Caftans of lighter weight materials were worn closer to the body, with the heavier fabrics being the outer layers.
  • Cotton was the usual lining material, with fur sometimes used to line a heavy outer coat. Silk facing was used at the neck, cuffs, hem and side slits, and was usually a contrasting colour to the caftan and lining fabrics.
  • Apart from the quality and cost of the fabrics, there was little difference in the styles or articles of dress between rich and poor, nor between those of Muslims and non-Muslims.
Belts and sashes (ukur)
  • The Ottomans were unusual among Islamic cultures for not treating the belt as a symbol of martial power and prestige. Belts are rarely shown in painting before the 17th century, and were not a conspicuous part of male civilian dress.
  • Sashes were made of a folded and seamed length of linen, measuring approximately 2m long by 15 cm wide. They featured elaborate gold-embroidered end panels, around 12-15 cm long.
  • Several 16th belts in the Topkapi Saray Museum are presumed to be womens. They are of ivory, silver or mother of pearl plaques, joined by links or mounted on leather. The are elaborately decorated with gold or silver scrollwork, and set with jewels. Their length would indicate they were worn around the waist, not the hips.
From http://www.redkaganate.org/clothing/ottocloth.shtml
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 01-29-2005, 09:19 AM
abir's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: , Canada
Posts: 467
Moroccan princesses (in Paris) and Prince Charles (London) wore bornos ...
Bornos may have Berber/Carthago/Roman origin ... so most likely North Africa and Mediterranean

Pictures from Corbis and gettyimages.


24th June 1969: Prince Charles, eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh, in the coronet, mantle and regalia which he will wear at his investiture as Prince of Wales at Caernarvon Castle. The mantle is in royal purple silk velvet lined with silk and ermine. The coronet was presented by the Goldsmith's Company of the City of London.

Fashion inspirations: bornos/cape/coat ...

The white one: NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: A model wears "The New Legend" bone suede cape, cream silk liquette and "Outlaw" bias embroidered skirt at the Catherine Malandrino Fall 2002 show in New York 10 February 2002.

The felt cape: NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: A model wears a felt cape, wool ribbed turtleneck and corduroy flared jeans at the Marc by Marc Jacobs Fall 2002 fashion show in New York 12 February 2002.

Dress in red: MILAN, ITALY - SEPTEMBER 30: A model wears a dress from Roberto Cavalli's Spring/Summer women's 2003 collection September 30, 2002 in Milan Italy.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	0000353336-002.jpg
Views:	175
Size:	44.3 KB
ID:	86231   Click image for larger version

Name:	0000353336-003.jpg
Views:	146
Size:	43.8 KB
ID:	86232   Click image for larger version

Name:	0000360430-009.jpg
Views:	322
Size:	50.0 KB
ID:	86233   Click image for larger version

Name:	0000360430-010.jpg
Views:	579
Size:	34.3 KB
ID:	86234  

Click image for larger version

Name:	3432610.jpg
Views:	130
Size:	44.8 KB
ID:	86241   Click image for larger version

Name:	1439077.jpg
Views:	176
Size:	46.5 KB
ID:	86242   Click image for larger version

Name:	51705268.jpg
Views:	158
Size:	39.7 KB
ID:	86243   Click image for larger version

Name:	51705409.jpg
Views:	99
Size:	31.5 KB
ID:	86244  

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 01-30-2005, 09:25 AM
Gentry
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: , United States
Posts: 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by abir
Moroccan princesses (in Paris) and Prince Charles (London) wore bornos ...
Bornos may have Berber/Carthago/Roman origin ... so most likely North Africa and Mediterranean
What the moroccan princess is wearing on top of her takchita is called Selham not Bornos. Bornos is a Tunisian word if I am not mistaken.
The selham is part of the moroccan traditional dress. Moroccan women wear it on top of their Takchitas when they are invited to weddings, and other kind of official ceremonies. It can be made from silk or from whool.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 01-30-2005, 09:29 AM
Gentry
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: , United States
Posts: 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monalisa
Nicole Kidman wearing a nice dress from YSL Yves saint-laurent,the influence from the sleevless moroccan caftans!


P.S:YSL is born in algeria,and living in morocco from the early 80's in the famous villa "majorelle" in marrakesh,so the influence is understundable!
I am not a fashion expert, but to me this dress looks inspired from oriental dresses (i.e., chinese, hong kong may be) than from the moroccan kaftans
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 01-30-2005, 09:37 AM
abir's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: , Canada
Posts: 467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layla27
What the moroccan princess is wearing on top of her takchita is called Selham not Bornos. Bornos is a Tunisian word if I am not mistaken.
The selham is part of the moroccan traditional dress. Moroccan women wear it on top of their Takchitas when they are invited to weddings, and other kind of official ceremonies. It can be made from silk or from whool.
Lovely Layla27 ... thanks for poiting that :)
I add the following on "Pre-Islamic Foundations of Maghribi Clothing".

...
A second distinctive North African garment, noted in the Islamic period, is the hooded cloak, called burnus in Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, and selham and akhnif (occasionally burnus) in Morocco. There was a similar Greco-Roman garment, the paenula, a travelling cloak to which a hood - cucullus - was usually attached. Whether or not this influenced the development of the burnus/selham/akhnif is unknown. In Arabia the term burnus refers to some kind of hat or head covering. The invading Arabs distinguished between two major Berber groups, the Baranis and the Butr. It has been suggested that this may have been a differentiation between those who wore hooded garments (baranis) and those who wore short garments (butr). It is fairly clear that in antiquity and in the first few centuries under Islam, the Berbers did not wear head coverings like the Muslim Arabs. Indeed, some Berbers [men?] shaved all or part of their heads, which is mentioned in Classical and Islamic sources.

Third is the large rectangular wrapping cloth used as an outer garment by both men and women - although in different ways - from Libya to Morocco in pre-Islamic times, and continuing into the 20th century. Wrap garments have different names: in Berber (Amazight) they are a'aban, akhusi, afaggu, tahaykt, and others; in Arabic ha'ik, ksa', and barrakan. The Arabs associated these ancient Berber wrappers with similar Arabic garments, such as the izar, milhafa, etc. It is clear, however, that the method of draping these wraps is quite different in the Maghrib.

From http://home.earthlink.net/~lilinah/C...biCostume.html
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 01-30-2005, 04:38 PM
Monalisa's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Namur, Belgium
Posts: 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Layla27
I am not a fashion expert, but to me this dress looks inspired from oriental dresses (i.e., chinese, hong kong may be) than from the moroccan kaftans

you are welcome layla27 to share with us this thread even if you are not a fashion expert!


As for Nicle kidman's dress, for me it's more influence from caftan(moroccan or what ever) than chinese influence,the kaftan generally get the opned slits and there's a version sleevless only in the moroccan one,as i know the chinese style doesn't use the sleeveless clothes it's maybe from tardition, and the colar is always tight"Mao colar",i guess that yves saint-laurnet get more moroccan influence from his childhood than a chinese one!



At least,if you read the previous posts, moroccan kaftans have many influences from other cultures and the chinese culture is one of them!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 02-04-2005, 01:43 PM
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: , United States
Posts: 1,059
i like the way tachita looks, its so femmine and colorful
__________________
ain' no sunshine when i gone
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 02-05-2005, 08:01 PM
Monalisa's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Namur, Belgium
Posts: 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by semisquare
i like the way tachita looks, its so femmine and colorful

Yes the "takchitas" are very nice and stylish,they the lonely traditionnal dress which fashionitas adopted and got a lot of inspiration!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 02-06-2005, 01:53 AM
sommone's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: , United States
Posts: 886
I really love the fabrics in which many of the dresses are made from, and many of the dresses are beautiful. Thanks for posting the pictures.
__________________
I'm back!!! Did anyone miss me?
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 02-06-2005, 10:01 AM
abir's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: , Canada
Posts: 467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monalisa
Yes the "takchitas" are very nice and stylish,they the lonely traditionnal dress which fashionitas adopted and got a lot of inspiration!
The "lonely"?

I understand that each one of us loves his/her own traditional dress, but they cant be the only dress which inspires fashion designers, as you say
Why it should be? Is it the only traditional dress and the only beautiful one in the world?
Come on!

We have to look around us and see what others wear.
Since centuries, women around the world wear long dresses, with/without sleeves, with/without embroidery, etc.

Fashion designer inspirations are different and come from around the world: from traditional dress, from artists painting, from nature, sea Hopefully the world is rich and designers can be inspired from different sources and from different traditional dresses.

I pick some examples from this site http://www.fashion-era.com/Trends/fa...4designers.htm, of fashion designer inspiration/influence in 2004.



Dolce and Gabbana produced limited edition 1930s inspired beaded and pleated floor length goddess dresses (so its Greek/Roman inspiration).

Ben de Lisi, a master of relaxed glamour dresses, focused on halter neck or strapless evening dresses in soft fluid jerseys and crepes de chines Picasso paintings inspired his fabric prints of hot deep pink and white or white and black fabrics swirling with geometric shapes and abstract swirls.

Betty Jackson took her inspiration from a Capri summer scene using fantastic prints that looked freshly brushed from an artist's palette.

Ronit Zilkha also showed an African selection in raw earth colours and natural accessories using cane and straw.

John Galliano at Christian Dior made a sexy modern young couture collection where Latino inspired flamenco flounces were worn with sweat tops and were in complete contrast to the formal couture evident in Lagerfeld's elegant designs
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 02-07-2005, 04:38 PM
Monalisa's Avatar
Courtier
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Namur, Belgium
Posts: 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by abir
The "lonely"?

I understand that each one of us loves his/her own traditional dress, but they cant be the only dress which inspires fashion designers, as you say
Why it should be? Is it the only traditional dress and the only beautiful one in the world?
Come on!


The "LONELY" was for the adopted by fashionitas thing!and as a result of that ,the moroccan caftans inspired many designers,i'm not carzy to claim that only caftans inspired the designer!


I assume when i say that they are the lonely traditionnal dresses adopted by fashionitas, thanks to the moroccan princesses who wore them in every event local or international,when they others choose to wear dresses from runaway designers, which made them very famous around the world!


I don't know other traditionnal clothes,maybe i'm wrong,but correct me if you have other exmaple, I saw many royals or celebreties wearing their traditionnal clothes, but it's always for local event, even aishwayra Rai the former miss world who used to wear saris, was wearing classical dresses from designer when she went to "Festival of Cannes".


I like the fact that the moroccan caftans and takchitas are now worn by many celibreties as i said before thanks to the moroccan princesses,when i see for example queen rania wearing the jordanian dresses only in local visits,and wears dresses from other designers in the events more coverd by medias! i wonder why she doesn't avail those occasions to present the jordanian dresses for the world since she's now "a fashion icon", and could change the image of the traditionnal jordanian dresses to dresses adopted by fashionitas and worn by celebrities!
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 02-08-2005, 01:24 AM
Amira's Avatar
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Casablanca, Morocco
Posts: 1,103
Actress Rachel Griffiths wearing a Caftan during the 11th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	aa.JPG
Views:	195
Size:	47.1 KB
ID:	90462   Click image for larger version

Name:	ass.JPG
Views:	79
Size:	42.2 KB
ID:	90463  
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 02-08-2005, 03:40 AM
Gentry
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: , United States
Posts: 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monalisa
I assume when i say that they are the lonely traditionnal dresses adopted by fashionitas, thanks to the moroccan princesses who wore them in every event local or international,when they others choose to wear dresses from runaway designers, which made them very famous around the world!
Caftans and Tachitas became famous thanks to the French designers who visited morocco and got inspired from them. Many famous fashion "leaders" have secondary houses in Marrakech and Essaouira. It is not thanks to the princess that the moroccan traditional dresses became famous. Still, they did a good job in getting it "acknowledged" :).
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 02-08-2005, 06:07 AM
abir's Avatar
Nobility
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: , Canada
Posts: 467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monalisa
The
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monalisa
"LONELY" was for the adopted by fashionitas thing!and as a result of that ,the moroccan caftans inspired many designers,i'm not carzy to claim that only caftans inspired the designer
Fine, this is clear then. Earlier, I posted interesting articles/sites which explain/discuss the fashion designer inspirations. To me its clear when I heard a designer get inspired from a Kaftan, this can be any type of kaftan from the whole world, since Kaftan doesnt mean necessarly and only takchita. I got this definition of Kaftan from Encyclopedia Britannica: Caftan also spelled Kaftan, man's full-length garment of ancient Mesopotamian origin, worn throughout the Middle East. It is usually made of cotton or silk or a combination of the two.

A caftan has long, wide sleeves and is open in the front, although frequently it is bound with a sash. The word caftan (or gaberdine) also refers to a black frock coat worn by Sasidic Jews since the European Middle Ages. An ankle-length coatlike garment with wide sleeves became fashionable for women's evening wear in the mid-20th century and was called a caftan.

So if you agree on the above, till now I read designers got inspired from Kaftans they don't specify a takchita the Moroccan dress. You can correct me if you have examples.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Monalisa
I assume when i say that they are the lonely traditionnal dresses adopted by fashionitas, thanks to the moroccan princesses who wore them in every event local or international,when they others choose to wear dresses from runaway designers, which made them very famous around the world!
T
hats nice. They are doing good job.

Countries that dont have monarchy/princesses, they opt for other/different ways to let the world know about their traditional dresses. An example: The fever for traditional-style clothes was given impetus at the Shanghai APEC meeting last year, when the leaders of various countries appeared at the closing ceremony wearing Chinese-style silk jackets. Traditional-style garments subsequently flooded the market, and appeared overnight in shopping malls, boutiques, and clothing wholesale markets. Many small tailor shops also popped up to join in this trend, purveying custom-made traditional-style clothes.

From http://www.chinavoc.com/life/fashion/traback.htm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Monalisa
I don't know other traditionnal clothes,maybe i'm wrong,but correct me if you have other exmaple, I saw many royals or celebreties wearing their traditionnal clothes, but it's always for local event, even aishwayra Rai the former miss world who used to wear saris, was wearing classical dresses from designer when she went to "Festival of Cannes".
The example of aishwayra Rai who wears classical dresses from designer when she went to "Festival of Cannes" she does wear Indian traditional dresses in her movies, and you know Indian movies cross the world and can reach all society categories, even better than few occasions like gala dinners/events/etc.


In my previous posts, I gave some examples of traditional dresses which influenced designers, like Flamenco/Latino, Chinese/Japanese, Indian/S.Asia, etc. I post down some links of world types of Kaftans and we see how much similarities they have, and again designers got inspired from Kaftans in general.

Indian Kaftan http://www.homeindia.com/catalogue/apparel/misc/kaftan.shtml
African Kaftan: http://www.africastyles.com/Women/fashion-women.html
North Africa, Middle East, Georgian, Caucasus, Armenian Kaftans: http://www.indiana.edu/~librcsd/etext/tilke/contents.html

You can find more about traditional dress influence on fashion in:
http://www.costumes.org/ETHNIC/1PAGES/ethnolnk.htm#Central%20America

If you look to pictures in the above site, you will notice the world traditional dresses influence is clear even in our day clothing. There is also a book called: Latin American Fashion Reader by Regina Root, here is the book description:From the tango-inspired dress of Argentina and guerilla chic in downtown Buenos Aires to swimwear on CopacabanaBeach and the rainbow that adorns Mayan women, Latin America has long been a source of inspiration for designers throughout the world. This book is a long overdue assessment of Latin America's influence on fashion. The authors examine the significance of textiles and dress to Latin American culture and the reasons behind it--from fashion history to popular culture and the (re)making of traditional garments, such as the poncho, the guayabera and maguey cactus fiber sandals. It also considers its global impact, visible in chains and mass-produced fashions, and the international worship of fashion icons such as Frida Kahlo and Eva Peron

From http://www.palgrave-usa.com/Catalog/product.aspx?isbn=1859738885

Quote:
Originally Posted by Monalisa
I like the fact that the moroccan caftans and takchitas are now worn by many celibreties as i said before thanks to the moroccan princesses,when i see for example queen rania wearing the jordanian dresses only in local visits,and wears dresses from other designers in the events more coverd by medias! i wonder why she doesn't avail those occasions to present the jordanian dresses for the world since she's now "a fashion icon", and could change the image of the traditionnal jordanian dresses to dresses adopted by fashionitas and worn by celebrities!
If you agree there are many traditional dresses in this world, then you will agree that people still use them, similar or different how Moroccans wear takchita, this doesnt affect how people around the world enjoy wearing their traditional dresses or how can influence designers.

In other side, I agree that Traditional dress reinforces tribal or national identity, and may demonstrate a deliberate visual separation from the values of Western culture, or the political agenda Western powers (political or corporate) are seen to be pursuing in the region. Traditional dress is often understood to be a protest against the encroachment of international capitalism, foreign religions or political invaders, and even the idea of change in general. Tribal sub-groups within a nation also use it to preserve a separate identity
From http://www.costumes.org/classes/fashiondress/traditiondress.htm

However, if a kaftan has inspired fashion designers, unfortunately it doesnt mean the original country of this Kaftan is a powerful nation.

Last, about rania traditional dress, I invite you to discuss it in ME, Jordan Royal Family. Rania has her own thread there. Thanks.
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Additional Links
Popular Tags
belgium birth brussels carl philip charlene chris o'neill crown prince frederik crown prince haakon crown princess mary crown princess mette-marit crown princess victoria current events engagement fashion genealogy grand duchess maria teresa grand duke henri hohenzollern infanta sofia jewellery jordan king carl xvi gustav king felipe king felipe vi king harald king juan carlos king philippe king willem-alexander luxembourg nobility official visit olympic games olympics ottoman pieter van vollenhoven president komorowski prince albert prince albert ii prince carl philip prince constantijn prince floris prince pieter-christiaan princess aimee princess anita princess astrid princess beatrix princess charlene princess claire princess laurentien princess mabel princess madeleine princess margriet princess mary princess mary fashion queen letizia queen mathilde queen maxima queen rania queen silvia queen sofia royal royal fashion russia sofia hellqvist spain state visit sweden the hague visit wedding



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:33 AM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014
Jelsoft Enterprises

Royal News Delivered to your Email!

You can get the latest Royal News right in your inbox.

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]