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  #81  
Old 10-26-2010, 06:00 PM
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If any current royalty has haemophilia or was or is a carrier of it, it's extremely unlikely that this information would be made public. This information would put them at risk.

Females are carriers but don't get the disease. Someone told me there is a female version of haemophillia but its different. You don't bleed to death but your blood thickens making life difficult. You can have children but you have to be careful if you get pregnant. That what someone told me but I'm not sure this is correct.

Females would never been able to give birth if they had haemophilia (they would bleed to death during childbirth).
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  #82  
Old 11-08-2010, 05:12 AM
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Haemophilia is much less common in females than in males though, because a girl has to inherit the gene from both parents to have it (a healthy X chromosome will stop the disease from breaking out), while a boy only has to inherit it from his mother (a boy can't inherit it from his father). Females are more often "just" carriers of the gene than sufferers of the disease. So haemophiliac women giving birth probably doesn't happen that often, even though I'm sure it's not unheard of. I've never heard of that female version of haemophilia before though.
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  #83  
Old 11-08-2010, 07:35 PM
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I heard this from someone when we were talking about a blood disorder that a female member of their family had (don't remember if it was their mother or their aunt). Both of these women had children but had very difficult childbirths. Since it was said it was a female version of haemophilia I assumed it was. It might not be though. It could just be a blood disease that's in the same family as haemophilia. Would be interesting if someone knew the answer to that.

Update: Looked this up in wikipedia. A female can have haemophilia but this is very very rare. Usually according to what I read it's a very very mild version of male haemophilia (for example during a dental procedure they might bled more than normal) but they have a cloting agents which stops it. They just have to be very careful as they also bruise easily.
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  #84  
Old 03-28-2011, 11:46 AM
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It all started with Queen Victoria
Princess royal Victoria
Edward VII
Princess Alice -carrier
Princess Irene -carrier gave to son or sons
Princess alix -carrier gave to son
Prince Frederick -hemophiliac
Princess louise
Princess Helena
Prince Arthur
Prince Albert
Prince Leopold -hemophiliac
Daughter Alice- carrier gave to son
Princess Beatrice - carrier
Daughter Victoria Eugenie carrier gave to son

An uncle of king Juan Carlos I of Spain had it
Cousins of queen Elizabeth II had it
But besides the royal family does hemophilia exist today? And could it show up again in the royal families ( gr grand children of the present monarchs?)
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  #85  
Old 03-28-2011, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Grandduchess24 View Post
An uncle of king Juan Carlos I of Spain had it
Two uncles of King Juan Carlos had haemophilia: Infante Alfonso, Prince of Asturias (1907-1938), and Infante Gonzalo (1914-1934); both them died young of internal bleeding following a car crash, Gonzalo in 1934 in Krumpendorf (Austria) and Alfonso four years later in Miami.
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  #86  
Old 03-28-2011, 05:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Furienna View Post
Haemophilia is the most known one, but there could be others. The dyslexia, that King Carl XVI Gustaf and Crown princess Victoria suffer from, comes from the king's father, Prince Gustaf Adolf. But where did he get it from? His father, King Gustaf VI Adolf, was very intellectual and sure not dyslectic. Maybe he had inherited it from his mother, the Brittish princess Margareth of Connaught? I don't know if she was dyslectic or not. But it's also very possible, that it started with Prince Gustaf Adolf.
Dyslexia, while some researchers believe it may be genetic as there is a lot of examples of it running in the family, has not been proven to be true. Many dyslexics are very intelligent, so Gustav having been intellectual doesn't rule it out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin View Post
I believe that the gene has completely disappeared from the descendants of Queen Victoria.
There is no way of knowing this. Females can be carriers and pass it along. I hope we don't see it reappear but it could be quite possible.
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  #87  
Old 03-30-2011, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by PrincessMolly View Post
Dyslexia, while some researchers believe it may be genetic as there is a lot of examples of it running in the family, has not been proven to be true. Many dyslexics are very intelligent, so Gustav having been intellectual doesn't rule it out.
I haven't said, that a dyslexic can't be intelligent. But especially back in the day, when people had no understanding for this handicap, and sufferers hardly got the help, that they could have gotten today, I'm afraid it wasn't all that common, that dyslexics became intellectual. Since a lot of intellectual knowledge has to be gained through reading, I think many dyslexics have just given up, if it was hard for them to get through a book or a magazine, and done other things instead. And back in the day before there was radio and TV, people couldn't learn things through listening to a radio show or watching a TV show either. Many dyslexics say one hundred years ago just got a low-paying job, where they didn't have to read much, or they focused on being good at other things instead. That was what prince Gustaf Adolf, our king's father, did to avoid feeling like a totally failure. He wasn't only a prince, but also the heir appearant, so everybody had high expectations for him, and like I said, his father was a very gifted scholar, who alledegedly had very high expectations on his sons and nephews to be as "perfect" as he was. So poor Gustaf Adolf must have been very ashamed of being as "stupid" as he was. He ended up becoming a very good athlet instead, and that was probably partly because he wanted to compensate for his short-comings, when it came to reading. Carl XV seems to have suffered from dyslexia as well, so even though he's not a direct ancestor of the current Swedish royal family (his brother Oscar II is), the handicap seems to have been around in the Bernadotte family for a very long time.
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  #88  
Old 06-22-2011, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by PrincessMolly View Post
There is no way of knowing this. Females can be carriers and pass it along. I hope we don't see it reappeare but it could be quite possible.
It is possible today to do a genetic test to see if a woman is indeed a carrier of haemophilia or not, so if a woman suspects that she has haemophilia in her family, it's easy for her to find out if she is a carrier or not. If she is a carrier, she can then decide if she wants to have children or not, and if she wants childen, she can for example choose to have IVF and choose to have only daughters or have a genetic testing done before the implanting a fertilized egg. For more info: Heredity of hemophilia - Canadian Hemophilia Society
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  #89  
Old 07-03-2011, 12:55 AM
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Exactly. And Furienna to answer your question: yes, if Victoria's mother had been a carrier, it's very likely that Charles of Leinigen would've been a sufferer, but he wasn't, (as Feodora was not a carrier) so it's unlikely that their mother would've carried the defective gene.

I don't know about likely - after all only 25% of Victoria's own sons suffered so it is just as likely that her older half-brother wouldn't have suffered.

Victoria had four son (Edward VII, Duke of Edinburgh, Duke of Connaught and Duke of Albany with only the Duke of Albany suffering from this illness).
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  #90  
Old 07-09-2011, 12:29 PM
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I do not understand why hemophilia was prevalent among the descendants of Queen Victoria.One of explanations seems to explain this as a spontaneous mutation.
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  #91  
Old 07-13-2011, 04:02 PM
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I don't like to use the word "mutation", as it has such a negative ring to it, but yes, it seems like it started with Queen Victoria.
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  #92  
Old 07-13-2011, 04:11 PM
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how would you call a mutation .. by a "nicer" word, I wonder?

(why is it not allowed to call a thing what it is ... political correctness? ...don't care about that much)
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  #93  
Old 07-13-2011, 04:50 PM
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You're right, I should have explained myself better. In this case, when it's a disease, I guess the word "mutation" is fine. But I don't like it, when it's used about positive changes, or even neutral changes, within a spieces, like how the elephans got their long trunks or the giraffs got their long necks. I don't think "mutation" is the right word for that, even though it's often used that way. A mutation is something bad, and nothing good or even neutral, in my opinion. But we're getting off topic here...
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  #94  
Old 07-13-2011, 06:06 PM
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how about "the structure of Queen Victoria's gene was changed"
Sorry.. couldn't resist it.. *smile*
Everyone understands
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Old 07-13-2011, 06:19 PM
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When a disease is caused by a point mutation in the genes, it is proper to call it a mutation. This distinguishes the disease as a particular kind of genetic disorder. There are two main kinds of mutations: ones in somatic cells (your regular body cells, sometimes leading to disease) and ones in sex cells (eggs or sperm) which are then present in every cell in the resulting infant's body and passed on to their offspring The latter kind can be spontaneous or inherited.

But is certainly proper to refer to diseases caused by genetic mutations by their proper term.

Mutations can be good or neutral, although it is rare. Perfect pitch is often considered a good thing. Some deaf people consider genetic forms of deafness to be a good thing. Some people are able to see things in motion much better than others - that's often considered good by athletes. And there's even a mutation for the immune system that protects against HIV - most people agree it's a good thing (and has been around for 500 years or more).
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  #96  
Old 07-13-2011, 06:37 PM
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A genetic mutation can actually be a positive. It could confer resistance to certain diseases or other positive adaptations. In other words, viewing the word "mutation" as a negative is something that is not done in scientific circles and shouldn't be done by the public.
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  #97  
Old 07-13-2011, 06:39 PM
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Yes, Vittoria, exactly. We hear more about negative mutations (and there's no clear way to study good mutations, actually - medical doctors focus on disease, people with extra abilities don't pop into the local clinic for gene testing). But mutations are what make us what we are - blue eyes are a complex set of mutations it turns out, from the original brown eyed gene pool (etc.) Neither brown eyes nor blues eyes are "better," there can be advantages to either.
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  #98  
Old 07-18-2011, 08:49 AM
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Yep, after doing some research after I opened this can of worms, I've actually found out, that it's not wrong to call a good or neutral change in the genes "a mutation". But since the word is mostly used for negative changes, I went along with that.
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Old 08-28-2011, 05:37 AM
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Just to clarify if anyone knows, has Victoria's hemophilia been "bred out" of the royal families of Europe?
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  #100  
Old 08-28-2011, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by XeniaCasaraghi View Post
Just to clarify if anyone knows, has Victoria's hemophilia been "bred out" of the royal families of Europe?
Perhaps and perhaps not. There have been no 100 per cenr positive recorded cases. Many of the lines with the disease have died out (eg Russia). It is possible that it may still be ine xistance amonmgst the desendants of Princess Victoria Eugenie, Queen of Spain through her daughters but they are very private people (non royals) and so it probably wouldnt come out in the media. Alsi it is thought that a child of Princess Xeia of Hohenlohe Langeburg may have it. Inherited through her father Furst Kraft but as far as I know it hasn't been proven.
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