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  #121  
Old 12-16-2006, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by leonardinha
That's partially true. A Catholic wedding does not always include a mass. For instance, if the bride or the groom is not a Catholic or if you don't want to take the Holy Communion, you can choose a wedding ceremony without a mass.
The Catholic Church does not accept marrying you, if you and your husband are not Catholics. You may or not be a praticing Catholic, but the bride and groom must always have the baptism, the solemn communion and now recently they are also demanding the confirmation (although it's not generalized yet). If the bride or the groom have not all these sacraments, the priest may celebrate it all before the wedding ritual... It's not quite usual, but it happens.

In a royal wedding, of course the ceremony includes a mass and a long service with music and everything else, but for commoners, it is somehow up to the wish of the couple. Some couples want a great ceremony, with a mass (which takes at least 50 minutes), music and singers, the church all adorned with flowers, etc.. Of course, that costs money: you have to pay for the musicians and singers, for the flowers... and the priest is also expecting you to pay him, you know...

Many couples prefer to have a little ceremony of 15 minutes (that does not include a mass), with just the basic wedding service. It's a cosy ceremony, usually in a small chapel and keeping it low profile. Either way, there is always holy communion for the bride and groom.
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  #122  
Old 12-16-2006, 08:02 PM
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Actually, you can be married in the Catholic church if only one of the couple is a Catholic. My sister and I (both practicing Catholics) married men who were not Catholic. We each had a ceremony celebrated by our family priest and an officiant of the religion of our husbands. My sister was even married in the church we were raised in and communion was offered to the Catholic guests. My ceremony was held at the resort where we had the reception and my priest requested and received a special dispensation from the Diocese to perform the ceremony somewhere other than the church. When I divorced my husband, I had to get the marriage annulled (for which I had to prove grounds for and took 2 years to complete) so that I was able to marry my current husband (who is Catholic) in the church.
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  #123  
Old 12-16-2006, 09:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elsa M.
The Catholic Church does not accept marrying you, if you and your husband are not Catholics.
Are you referring to Royal Weddings only or couples in general?

I sincerely hope you are wrong with your statement, otherwise my husband and I have been under the wrong impression for nearly 40 years!!!!

My husband is Catholic, I am a Protestant. We were married in a Catholic Church by a Catholic Priest and the only commitment we had to make at that time was that I agreed to bring up any children as Catholics, which we did.
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  #124  
Old 12-17-2006, 03:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott
Are you referring to Royal Weddings only or couples in general?

I sincerely hope you are wrong with your statement, otherwise my husband and I have been under the wrong impression for nearly 40 years!!!!

My husband is Catholic, I am a Protestant. We were married in a Catholic Church by a Catholic Priest and the only commitment we had to make at that time was that I agreed to bring up any children as Catholics, which we did.

That's perfectly fine. My mom is Catholic, my dad is Methodist. When they married 35 years ago, they had to agree that they'd raise any kids they had as Catholics, which is what they did.

The Catholic Church will marry two people of differing faiths, provided you get a dispensation from your parish priest. Even if you don't do that, I can't see why a priest wouldn't preside over a Catholic's wedding, regardless of who they're marrying. I mean, Katie Holmes had a Catholic priest at her wedding to Tom Cruise to please her parents and she married a Scientologist!
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  #125  
Old 12-17-2006, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sister Morphine
The Catholic Church will marry two people of differing faiths, provided you get a dispensation from your parish priest. Even if you don't do that, I can't see why a priest wouldn't preside over a Catholic's wedding, regardless of who they're marrying. I mean, Katie Holmes had a Catholic priest at her wedding to Tom Cruise to please her parents and she married a Scientologist!
I believe you are referring to ecumenical ceremonies… when the rites are performed by two different religions at the same time (e.g. Princess Sofia of Greece and Prince Juan Carlos of Spain). That’s a different thing. In those situations, the non-catholic spouse reserves himself the right to not recognize the ceremony and there are specific “rules” for it.

But I’ve never heard of any catholic wedding, performed inside a catholic church, where the spouses are not catholic and do not take holly-communion... I may be wrong though.
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  #126  
Old 12-17-2006, 04:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elsa M.

But I’ve never heard of any catholic wedding, performed inside a catholic church, where the spouses are not catholic and do not take holly-communion... I may be wrong though.
Well I know for a fact that both spouses do not have to be Catholic as is the case in my own marriage, and also of two of my husbands siblings. As long as one of the Bridal couple is Catholic it is acceptable.
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  #127  
Old 12-18-2006, 01:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elsa M.
I believe you are referring to ecumenical ceremonies… when the rites are performed by two different religions at the same time (e.g. Princess Sofia of Greece and Prince Juan Carlos of Spain). That’s a different thing. In those situations, the non-catholic spouse reserves himself the right to not recognize the ceremony and there are specific “rules” for it.

But I’ve never heard of any catholic wedding, performed inside a catholic church, where the spouses are not catholic and do not take holly-communion... I may be wrong though.

You don't have to take Holy Communion during a wedding, unless it's part of a mass. Most people don't do that....they just do the wedding service in an of itself. If both parties are Catholic, they'd probably opt to have the service inside an actual mass. If one party is not Catholic, they'd just do the service. And a Catholic priest will preside over the wedding provided the Catholic party gets a dispensation to marry a non-Catholic in their parish church.
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  #128  
Old 12-18-2006, 06:34 AM
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No, Elsa, that's not true. I'm Catholic, my husband is not (he was only baptized) and we married in a Catholic church in front of a Catholic priest (btw, it's not the priest who celebrates the wedding, but the bride and the groom). The ceremony was about one hour long and there wasn't any Holy Communion.
There are three "ways" to celebrate a Catholic wedding.
I only have this link in Italian, I'm sorry I don't have anything in English:

http://www.liturgia.maranatha.it/Mat.../coverpage.htm


Quote:
Originally Posted by Elsa M.
The Catholic Church does not accept marrying you, if you and your husband are not Catholics. You may or not be a praticing Catholic, but the bride and groom must always have the baptism, the solemn communion and now recently they are also demanding the confirmation (although it's not generalized yet). If the bride or the groom have not all these sacraments, the priest may celebrate it all before the wedding ritual... It's not quite usual, but it happens.
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  #129  
Old 12-19-2006, 09:18 PM
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I really think that this is an issue that depends on where you are in the world, and depends on your diocese. Some diocese are stricter than others on certain matters, depending on how orthodox you may or may not be. What's most important is that the marriage, and all its corresponding commitments and vows, are recognized by the couple being married, and, in the case of the royals, the state.
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  #130  
Old 12-20-2006, 05:38 AM
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Well, it's true that some dioceses are stricter than other dioceses, but Vatican law is one for all Catholics! :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyK
I really think that this is an issue that depends on where you are in the world, and depends on your diocese. Some diocese are stricter than others on certain matters, depending on how orthodox you may or may not be. What's most important is that the marriage, and all its corresponding commitments and vows, are recognized by the couple being married, and, in the case of the royals, the state.
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  #131  
Old 02-15-2007, 06:24 PM
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guests

since in most cases the royal couple invites an extremely large amount of people to the wedding itself, but not so many to the reception, is there usually an event for all the wedding guests?? For example- a pre wedding dinner??
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  #132  
Old 09-12-2007, 03:10 PM
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Why don't the guests in church do that?

When there is a royal marriage or some high royal event like funeral etc, why don't the guests do a bow when a monarch goes through the church to his seat? For example: When Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden will marry, a lot of monarchs will attent the wedding, so f. e. HM King Albert II of the Belgians. When he goes through the church, IMO the guests, who are still in the church, should do a bow, to show her respect. Or what do you think?
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  #133  
Old 09-12-2007, 03:53 PM
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i'm not sure this answers your question but i've noticed at some royal events people don't really bow they dip their heads or kinda do a quick bob unless they are being introduced person to person then you see the full bow/curtsy. i'm not sure about the rules in a social setting (wedding or funeral etc) as opposed to an official event. for instance at the 40th BD party, with all the royals there, that would have been alot of bowing up an down all night.
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  #134  
Old 09-13-2007, 03:04 AM
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It's an interesting question. My answer (guess) would be that a church is "God's House". Most monarchs take some kind of oath to God or the Church. Coronations happen in cathedrals. So to show someone else deference (ie a monarch) before God by bowing/curtseying, or in front of God if you like, would be offense to God. It would probably violate the First Commandment - 'Thous shall have no other Gods before me.".
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  #135  
Old 09-13-2007, 11:52 AM
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It would be better if all kings and queens would going together to their sets and other guests in church will do that jus once.
Maybe if there going (kings and queens) in some distance between each other for many people it's hard bowing for all the time/so many times...
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  #136  
Old 11-09-2007, 02:00 PM
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I think as a general rule guest bow/curtsey to the Sovereign of the realm where the wedding is taking place and perhaps to the bride and groom on the way out of the Church.

If you look at old pictures of Queen Elizabeth IIs wedding there was quite a lot of guests did bow/curtsey to the other Royal guests.

But on the whole it gets a bit beyond things when a procession of possibly 20 crowned heads passses and people try and acknowlege each King or Queen it would be like going on a trampoline.
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  #137  
Old 11-09-2007, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
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I think as a general rule guest bow/curtsey to the Sovereign of the realm where the wedding is taking place and perhaps to the bride and groom on the way out of the Church.

If you look at old pictures of Queen Elizabeth IIs wedding there was quite a lot of guests did bow/curtsey to the other Royal guests.

But on the whole it gets a bit beyond things when a procession of possibly 20 crowned heads passses and people try and acknowlege each King or Queen it would be like going on a trampoline.

At the Wedding of Frederik and Mary the bowed/curtesied when member of the Danish Royal Family entered the Church.
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  #138  
Old 11-22-2007, 07:11 AM
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If you seen the footage from QEII's Diamond Wedding service you can see the guest in Church curtsey to HM and TRHs
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  #139  
Old 11-24-2007, 04:21 PM
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Not a royal wedding, but I saw news footage online of Queen Paola's birthday celebration at Laeken, and a guest curtsied to the Queen when presented to her.
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  #140  
Old 02-29-2008, 02:43 PM
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I've seen video of HRH Crown Princess Mary's wedding and as she walked down the asle all the guests were bowing/curtseying, also at HM Queen Elizabeth II's coronation all bowed/curtsied as she passed so I would guess that you would bow or curtsy to Royal Highness and Majesties no matter were you are.
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