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  #61  
Old 10-22-2005, 03:27 PM
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I said earlier that I hadn't really seen many pictures of Anne-Marie, so I couldn't judge.

And, after seeing this picture of Anne-Marie I don't see the similarities either. Sorry:(
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  #62  
Old 10-22-2005, 03:40 PM
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Re:

Anne-Marie has a very distinct look to her. I can't even see a resemblance in young photographs. I think Anna Anderson has a strange regal look in some photographs I've seen but we can all adopt that can't we?
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  #63  
Old 10-22-2005, 03:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeatrixFan
Anne-Marie has a very distinct look to her. I can't even see a resemblance in young photographs. I think Anna Anderson has a strange regal look in some photographs I've seen but we can all adopt that can't we?
Mette-Marit learned to have a regal look, and since every woman was expected to be elegant even 20 years ago, Anna Anderson would have had even less trouble gaining her regal look.
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  #64  
Old 10-26-2005, 12:04 PM
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Lost Imperial Jewels?

Just on a similar note, it was said that Empress Alexandra was a very shrewd woman, and when the Imperial Family had to abdicate, she knew that if her English relatives were to rescue the, they would need money in their new country.

So, she got her daughters to sew some of the family's jewelry into their dresses, she also did the same. The report written by the head executioner (sorry can't remember his name. maybe Yurovsky?), he said it took longer for the females to die, that they had to be shot more times than the males.
He ddn't know why at the time, but history has speculated that it was because of the jewelry. What could have happened to all the jewels? Even a fire wouldn't have destroyed diamonds.
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  #65  
Old 03-11-2006, 09:31 PM
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Actually, it has never been confirmed that the missing body is that of Grand Duchess Marie. Actually, most evidence supports that Grand Duchess Anastasia Nicholaevna is missing from the grave.
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  #66  
Old 03-12-2006, 03:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hillary_nugent
So it is really infact Maria and not Anastasia that is missing? O__O
No. This is not a fact.
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  #67  
Old 03-12-2006, 03:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msfroyste
it was rumored/stated that two bodies were burned, the two smallests, which at the time, according to alexandra's diaries, and other sources, that would've been maria and alexei. yourovsky? stated that the two bodies that were burned were that of a young man and of a young woman. it was proven/speculated through the dna testing that, in fact, that the bodies of maria and alexei were the two that were missing. all in all, a sad story concerning the entire family.
DNA cannot identify who a person is, only what family they belong to.
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  #68  
Old 03-12-2006, 03:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fashionista100
Unfortunately, none of the Tsar's family survived. There is no way their captors could have allowed it. They shot them, bayonetted them, beat them and then poured acid and cut them up. Burned some of them and tossed them down a mine shaft. I seriously doubt someone would have been rescued or survived. It is a brutal and truely sad occassion. While there are other romanovs around the world who survive, they are different branches of the family, not the direct descendants of Nicholas. No one could be the direct descendant of Alexi, I'm sure the wounds he sustained coupled with his hemophilia killed him instantly and gave no chance of recovery.
Actually, the deaths of Anastasia and Alexei are merely theories of history. They cannot be proven.
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  #69  
Old 03-12-2006, 03:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Layla1971
Only five bodies were found at the site where the Imperial Family was buried.
Apparently, the five bodies matched the descriptions of the Tsar, Empress, Olga, Tatiana, and Maria.
But skeletons matching Anastasia, and Alexei were not found.
I wonder what happened to them? I mean, even if the Anna Anderson mystery isn't true, the bodies must be somewhere, or the children managed to get away somehow.
Actually, 9 bodies were found. There were eleven people shot in the Ipatiev House.
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  #70  
Old 03-12-2006, 03:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Layla1971
I remember reading part of an American book that said it was the remains of Aleksey, and Maria that were missing. But, apart from that, I've only heard of it being Anastasia and Aleksey that were missing.
Still confused!
Both Russian scientiests and American scientists examined the bones in Ekaterinburg. The Russians insist that Marie is missing while Amercians insist it is Anastasia.
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  #71  
Old 03-12-2006, 12:06 PM
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The scientist combined pictures of the heads they found with photographs of the Imperial Family. With that they foudn out that Maria is missing, not Anastasia.
Did you ever read the details of what happened on 17th July 1918???
I don't think anybody could get out there living!
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  #72  
Old 03-12-2006, 01:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juliamontague
The scientist combined pictures of the heads they found with photographs of the Imperial Family. With that they foudn out that Maria is missing, not Anastasia.
Did you ever read the details of what happened on 17th July 1918???
I don't think anybody could get out there living!
Yes, but the Yurovsky note is all we really have and the accounts of murderers. Why should we believe them 100%?
-Yes, the Russian scientists did combine picutres, but the skulls were placed together so badly, they were sure to give inaccurate results, according to Dr. William Maples. Upon further examination, it is shown that all of the vertebrae are to mature to be that of Anastasia. None of the bones show ANY sign of immaturity. Anastasia was also the shortest of all the grand duchesses. None of the bodies measured 5'2, so the chances of Anastasia being among those found seems nill.
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  #73  
Old 03-15-2006, 02:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlottesville
Yes, but the Yurovsky note is all we really have and the accounts of murderers. Why should we believe them 100%?
-Yes, the Russian scientists did combine picutres, but the skulls were placed together so badly, they were sure to give inaccurate results, according to Dr. William Maples. Upon further examination, it is shown that all of the vertebrae are to mature to be that of Anastasia. None of the bones show ANY sign of immaturity. Anastasia was also the shortest of all the grand duchesses. None of the bodies measured 5'2, so the chances of Anastasia being among those found seems nill.
well, actually Marie was the shortest! The Tsarina said so herself in a letter.
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  #74  
Old 04-09-2006, 04:07 PM
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Missing persons split from OTMAA the Lost Romanovs Part 2

Could the Bulgarian mountain village of Gabarevo be the last refuge of the lost Romanov Princess?

Many years after the Bolshevikhs in Russia had executed the royal family, forensics who examined the exhumed skeletons of Russia’s last monarch Nikolay II and his family, discovered that the mortal remains of one of the princesses and the crown prince Alexey were missing. Thus, the foundations for one of the biggest mysteries of the 20th century history were laid, and a great number of hypotheses on the possible ways in which these two members of the Russian royal family, the Romanov, had escaped certain death, and their possible whereabouts came to being. One of the most striking of these was the claim put forward by Bulgarian investigator Blagoy Emanuilov that Princess Anastasia and her brother Alexey of Russia had spent their last days and had died peacefully in the Bulgarian village of Gabarevo in the Balkan Range. Radio Bulgaria brings the story of how the legal expert put two and two together.

Dozens of fake Anastasias and Alexeys the world over had tried in vain to claim their rights to being the famous regal personae, entitled by right of birth to the throne of Nikolay II. It is very likely that while the impersonators were making a big fuss about their made-up stories, the true prince and princess had led a quiet and undisturbed life in a remote village huddled in the folds of the Central Balkan Range in Bulgaria, not far from the historic town of Kazanluk with its famous Thracian mound. The elderly villagers in Gabarevo still bring vivid memories of the mysterious Russians who had settled in the village some time around 1922-1923. As if from nowhere, a young Russian woman of regal stature, presenting herself as Countess Eleonora Albertov Krueger, arrived in the village. She insisted that everybody addressed her as Nora. She lived with the Russian physician who had appeared a month prior to her arrival, and whom she subsequently married. However, everybody was aware that theirs’ was a formal marriage and that the lady was treating her husband as if she had married below herself. Almost a year later a tall frail young man, enlisted in the municipality register as Georgi Zhudin, but better known as Georges, accompanied by several more Russians took refuge in their home. The improvised Russian community shared one thing in common: they never mentioned their origins and their past, nor did they give explanations about the purpose of their stay. Georges shunned other people and usually kept strictly to himself right until the last days of his life in 1930. Rumours had it Georges and Nora were siblings and of royal blood. The young lady had exquisite manners, spoke several foreign languages, played the piano, and was skilled in white and colour Russian embroidery. She was an avid reader and always smoked cigarettes. Even opium was mentioned at some point. One thing was striking about her: she had a scar from a wound inflicted by a gun shot between her right cheek and her neck. She had a similar wound on her chest. She passed away on July 20, 1954, aged 55, taking away her secrets to the grave. She was laid to her rest alongside the grave of Georges. “A great deal of the life facts about Princess Anastasia, whose verity historians had proven, coincided with Nora’s life in the village of Gabarevo,” Blagoy Emanuilov says and adds, “Near the end of her earthly days Nora often recalled childhood experiences of being bathed in gold baths, and combed and clothed by maids. She mentioned having a princess’s room all by herself and remembered drawings she had made. There is other evidence, as well. In the early 1950s a Russian who once served on the anti-Bolshevikh White Guard and who had taken refuge in the Bulgarian Black Sea town of Balchik referred to Nora and Georges from the village of Gabarevo when describing the lives of the executed royal family. He told witnesses that the late tzar Nikolay II had ordered him personally to take Anastasia and Alexey out of the palace and hide them safely in the country. Apparently they had somehow managed to make their way to Odessa, where Anastasia was said to be wounded by the Red Army cavalry. They got off at Tegerdag in Turkey, and the Russian White Guard officer claimed fate had taken them as far as the village of Gabarevo in Bulgaria. In the late 1950s another Russian residing in the town of Chirpan near Stara Zagora in Southern Bulgaria announced the forthcoming visit of a Russian delegation that was to pay tribute to the graves of two important Russian personalities in the village of Gabarevo. However, he failed to mention the names of the high-profile personalities and was soon taken away by sudden death. Experts have found a great percentage of matching when comparing the photographs of 17-year-old Russian princess Anastassia Romanov to the picture of 35-year-old Eleonora Krueger from the village of Gabarevo. The year of birth is the same, too. Another thing: Georges’ contemporaries described him as suffering from consumption, and being thin and yellowish as glass. Russian court physicians, when describing the crown prince Alexey who was known to be a haemophiliac, gave the same description. Tuberculosis and haemophilia share many similar signs, physicians claim.”

Krustina Chomakova from the village of Gabarevo recalls how the mysterious Nora Krueger used to teach them French, English and Latin, or do the props for the amateur theatre productions, or even did the make-up, or offered her services as prompter although the bullet had affected her vocal chords, and she kept her voice low and spoke mainly through the nose. In her words the young Russian aristocrat had transformed entirely the life of the people in the tiny village huddled amidst the thickness of the Balkan Range forest. Everyone whispered under their breath she was a Russian princess.

“Back in 1930 when the majority of the Bulgarians hardly even knew what ballet was, she put on a ballet show at the village school,” Krustina Chomakova goes on to say. “She made fancy coloured costumes out of stretchable paper. Ah, the success the show had! The following year we mounted a production of “The Flowers’ Ball” operetta. She used to be in charge of the spring festival that grew into a large court fancy-dress ball of sorts, with the people from the village guised as Eskimos, Africans, etc.”

In 1995 forensics exhumed the bones of Nora and Georges in the presence of a forensic physician and an anthropologist. To their surprise they found a very precious item in Georges’ grave, a ladanka, a small icon of the Lord Jesus Christ left inside the graves of only high-profile Russian aristocracy members. Naturally, DNA analysis is the only plausible scientific method to give the answer to the question whether Nikolay II’s two youngest children had ended their days peacefully thousands of miles from the city of Ekaterininburg in Siberia, where in 1918 their royal parents and siblings had been shot dead by order of the Bolshevikhs.

http://www.bnr.bg/RadioBulgaria/Emis...l/Gabarevo.htm

You can find appropriate pictures when you click on the link.
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  #75  
Old 04-11-2006, 02:06 PM
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What do y'all think of her? I think the Bulgaria story is the most believable of them all, but the chance of any escape at all to me seems unlikely, as sad as it is.
  #76  
Old 04-11-2006, 02:16 PM
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That was a very interesting read. Now maybe I missed it in the article (sorry if I did), but I know it says they exhumed the bones, but did they run DNA tests on them? I'm assuming they didn't because it would have ended up in the news. Or are they waiting to get approval to run DNA tests?
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  #77  
Old 04-11-2006, 02:44 PM
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Interesting! But I was under the impression that it was not Grand Duchess Anastassia that was missing but instead Grand Duchess Maria! I don't know, this is one mystery that will never be solved!
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  #78  
Old 04-11-2006, 04:31 PM
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Part I

The mystery in the shadow of the two-headed eagle

I agreed to describe moments from the dramatic story of Nora not with the intention to fan the flame of the sensation. Since 1920 many historians, journalists and writers worldwide tried, although unsuccessfully, to clear up the facts about the last days of Emperor Nikolay II and his family. After 1993 in Bulgaria also came out dozens of newspaper publications, and two books in 1998: “The Romanovs – the End of a Mystery” by the journalist from Stara Zagora Donka Yotova, and “The Secret of Nikolay II” by the examining magistrate Blagoy Emanuilov. At present he is completing his second book “Nikolay II and the Conspiracy of the Century”, where he sets forth two versions: First, in order to save the crown prince Alexey and one of his daughters, long before his execution the emperor replaced them with duplicates and the real ones were taken out of the country. Second, the execution of the tsar’s family was not a work of the Bolsheviks but the result of an international conspiracy.
My aim is different. If I could stir the interest of the diplomatic circles to help at last uncover and publish the truth about this mystery of the past 20th century. I think the statesmen, politicians and diplomats of several countries owe this much to the people of Russia in the first place, and then to the European and world community. This is necessary because after the American film “Anastasia” (1956), in the late 1990s 20th Century Fox released a cartoon fairytale “Princess Anastasia”, which impresses on the children worldwide untruths about the fate of a historical personality. And this is a crime against history!

Absurd hypothesis or version close to the truth?

It first appeared on the pages of the Kazanlak newspaper Weekly News (Sedmichni Novini No 1 of March 22, 1993) under the title “Are the Two Graves in Gabarevo Royal?” Its author, the writer Dr. Dimiter Nyagolov, neurologist in the Kazanlak Hospital, is son of the Gabarevo priest Hristo Nyagolov. The publication was provoked by an article printed in Trud newspaper (No 8 of January 11, 1993) that in 1991 from a common grave near Ekaterinburg skeletons were dug out which, according to information from the French journal Express, by comparative genetic examinations were identified as the remains of Emperor Nikolay II, his wife and three of his daughters, shot on July 17, 1918. The remains of two of the tsar’s children were not found – Alexey (born in 1907) and Anastasia (b. 1901).
This news stirred up excited comments in the home of the old priest. His daughter Maria reminded her brother Dimiter of mysterious conversations they heard in their childhood. “Write to some newspaper what we know!” Maria insisted. After much hesitation and apprehension least he would become a laughing-stock, Dr. Nyagolov made come checkups in the municipal and church archives to back up his version and finally decided to make public the secret kept by his family for over 40 years. The two graves he writes about in his article are those of Eleonora Albertova Kruger (Nora), who died on July 20, 1954, and of Georgi (Georges) Zhudin, who died in December 1930. As according to the inhabitants of Gabarevo he was Nora’s brother, it is logical to suppose that the missing Prince Alexey was hiding under this name. Metropolitan Prof. Yordan Yordanov, comparing the pictures of the 13-year-old Alexey and the 18-year-old Georges, affirms they are one and the same person! (Duma, March 16, 2004)

The insight of a historian

In 1947 the Austrian woman Charlotte, wife of attorney Nikolay Ganev from Gabarevo, settled in the village with her little son Zhoro. “She was a very kind, pleasant woman. We called her Lotte. We became friends. She was very close with the doctor’s wife madam Nora. She said they talked in German, which Nora commanded ‘as her mother tongue’ (remember this statement of Lotte!). Unfortunately, Charlotte and her husband divorced and she became a nun in a convent near Veliko Tarnovo. But she did not stay there long, she got a job in Kalofer and often came to Gabarevo. She renewed her friendship with us and Nora. She visited her often and sometimes would say to us: ’Nora is carrying a big secret!” This is what aunty Nedyalka, the 90-year-old widow of priest Nyagolov, told me. In Kalofer Charlotte came in contact with the curator of the Hristo Botev Museum, Vasilka Kerteva, a highly educated woman, who showed lively interest in Nora. Lotte introduced them and they met several times in Gabarevo. In 1949 or 1950 Kerteva went on a business trip to the Soviet Union to seek materials on Hristo Botev in the Russian museums. There she came upon one of the last pictures of the tsar’s family. The face of the girl on the right (Anastasia), elongated, with big intelligent eyes, the only one among the four daughters wearing a bang, seemed familiar, dÎjÈ vu. Finally she remembered, “Yes, in Gabarevo!” Upon her return to Kalofer, Kerteva suggested to Charlotte to visit Nora. They talked, Kerteva watched her carefully, and when the two left, she told Charlotte, “You know who madam Nora is? She is Anastasia, the daughter of Nikolay II!” These words and her positive affirmation that judging by pictures and dates of birth Anastasia and Alexey corresponded to Eleonora and Georges, Lotte shared as a secret with the priest’s family. These were things that it was dangerous to talk about in those times. So, the historian’s insight was kept secret for 4 decades.
The examining magistrate Blagoy Emanuilov, born in Gabarevo, set out to unravel the mystery with emotion and zeal. A team of research associates also took up the matter. The aim was to unbury the remanants of the supposed tsar’s children and run a DNA test. Unfortunately, since 1956 the old village cemetery was a park, which hindered the mission. In July 1995, anthropologist Prof. Yordan Yordanov from Sofia and Assoc. Prof. Maria Grozeva, forensic doctor in Stara Zagora, with permission from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the District Prosecutor’s Office, uncovered two graves but a suspicion was voiced that they were not the ones. Blagoy Emanuilov had greater success. On September 14, 1996, he came across skeletons, remnants of clothes and objects proving beyond doubt that they belonged to Nora and Georges. Emanuilov locked them away somewhere and hence started the absurd conflict who, where and how should send them for analysis. It is unexplainable why the Bulgarian and the Russian states did not intervene in this pursuit of monopolizing the revelation of the truth. But this is another story.

The impact

The version set forth was received differently – some received it with great curiosity, others found it absurd, even called it a “mare’s nest” (Duma, No 181, August 4, 1995), but most were the skeptics, and not without reason.
After the execution of the tsar’s family a rumour spread that some of the children had escaped. (Evidence of this is a secret telegram by Lenin, sent out on the next day to the soviets in Russia: “Trace down the missing Romanova!”) Since then more than 50 imposters have claimed at different times that they are heirs of Nikolay II. The most striking example is of Anna Anderson, who in March 1922 declared she was Anastasia. But after 64 years of delusion, when Anderson died, a DNA test showed she was a dummy and she was really the Polish woman Francisca Shankowska.
According to the historian Vladlen Sirotkin, the Georgian Natalia Balikadze is Anastasia. Even from a convent in Bulgaria came the rumour that allegedly a nun of Russian descent before her death confessed she was Princess Anastasia. There were false Alexeys, too. For example, a Heino Tamet from Vancouver. On the other hand, Prince Alexis d’Anjou de Bourbon-Conde Romanov-Dolgoruki, living in Spain, alleges he is grandson of the surviving Princess Maria (according to one version, the surviving princess was not Anastasia but Maria) from her daughter Olga-Beata. He died in Spain in 1995 at the age of 46 without seeing the DNA results from the laboratory of Dr. Peter Gill in Scotland Yard. All this gave grounds to the Bulgarian skeptics to say: “Well, why not fabricate a Bulgarian Anastasia?” Still, I will attempt a portrait of Nora, as I saw her in 1949.

Link of the text with picture:
http://www.diplomatic-bg.com/c2/content/view/404/47/
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Old 04-11-2006, 04:32 PM
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Part II

The Gabarevo “Countess”

I was 11 years old when my family went to live in Gabarevo (1946). My father was assigned as head of the Bulgarian Agrarian and Cooperative Bank branch in the village, and my mother was appointed teacher. One of the first “secrets” I heard from my school mates was they took lessons in some subjects with the wife of the “Russian doctor”, Madam Nora, who was a “POLISH COUNTESS” (this was her legend when in 1922 she arrived in Gabarevo). The local teachers were jealous of these private lessons. Perhaps they thought their competence was questioned or they feared that Nora, who was said to live a weird way of life, may have an adverse influence on the children. Who knows? But it was a fact that every student “exposed” to be taking lessons with Nora immediately fell in the teachers’ disgrace. I admit that my imagination was fascinated by the strange sound of her name, by the children’s accounts filled with adoration, and especially by her noble descent. But when three years later my parents’ ambitions to give me a solid grounding for the city high school brought me in the circle of Madam Nora’s private students, I had to part with my romantic fantasies about her and gradually accept her more earthly, less perfect but much more dramatic character.
My first encounter with Nora was disappointing, even shocking. I was met by a tall, gaunt, skinny woman, looking too old for her age (she was 50 at the time). Her short light hair had a strange hair-style – fluffy above the ears as a wig, with a curled bang on the high forehead. Her face was bluish pale and puffed up. She was dressed with aristocratic carelessness – corduroy trousers and pullover with high collar, round which a silk scarf was wound up. A large pedigree dog ran past her barking at me, but she scolded it and it disappeared with its tail between the legs. I was stunned by her voice – nasal and snuffling as if it came from a horn.
I must have looked quite dumbfounded, because Nora smiled slightly, patted me encouragingly on the back and took me in. She had turned the doctor’s quarters above the ambulatory into a kind of college, afternoon shift of the village school. Here came desperately poor students as well as excellent students who wanted to learn more in their favourite subjects. She accepted all. Apart from French and Russian, she taught them mathematics, history, even Bulgarian grammar, and instructed the girls in good manners, machine embroidery, cooking. She did it free – she took money from no one.
Nora was an extraordinary, extremely educated woman for her time. She had encyclopedic knowledge, proficiency in several languages, she had studied painting, she played the piano. A refined aristocratism transpired in her manners. All this she could only get in a very rich noble family. She was also distinguished for a cultivated restraint, discreetness and dignity. Now I realize that in Gabarevo she hardly had a milieu for adequate intercourse. Perhaps that is why to the end of her life she remained lonely and unappreciated. In fact, some years ago her goddaughter Mariana from Kazanlak put it very precisely: “For the inhabitants of Gabarevo Nora was always something like an extraterrestrial!”

The suite

According to contemporaries, most probably in the summer of 1922 one after the other several Russian emigrants settled in the village of Gabarevo. First came Petr Alexandrovich Alexeev, whose name was soon “Bulgarized” into Petar Alexiev. He took lodging with some old people. In the municipal register he is registered as “born on January 15, 1884, in Smolensk, Russia”. He said he was a doctor. After he cured several local patients, a committee of doctors checked his medical knowledge, recognized his qualifications and he was appointed as doctor of 14 villages with a seat in Gabarevo. About a month later arrived an exquisitely beautiful young lady in an elegant summer dress. In the municipality she was registered as Eleonora Albertova Kruger, 24, born in Petersburg. In the column of nationality “Russian” is corrected to “Polish”. Dr. Alexiev welcomed her as a close person – he addressed her as “Nora” and took her to live in the same house. Nora told Gabarevo women that she was a daughter of a Russian nobleman and Polish countess, but she never mentioned the names of her parents. Never! She also said she was married, her husband and child had perished and she saved herself escaping from Russia.
She had two distinctive features: her snuffling and the invariable silk scarf round her neck. A rumour spread that she was shot at while escaping and she was wounded. According to some, her vocal cords were damaged, according to others – she was wounded in the breast, while still others thought the scar on her cheek to be from a ricochet bullet. Nora never disclosed the truth. Two months after her arrived Mitrofan. He stayed with the doctor and Nora. He cooked for them, but he did not stay long, he left for some place never to come back. Perhaps around the same time three more white-emigrants arrived – Matvey, Yakov and Sergey, who settled in Gabarevo and even had their own families. At first sight they were little educated, common people. But upon careful observation Gabarevites noticed that they, like Nora and Dr. Alexiev, didn’t talk about their descent and past and concealed their identity. Maybe they had a special mission – be at the call (a kind of “suite”) of very important persons?
The cohabitation of Nora and Dr. Alexiev under one roof started to disturb the patriarchal morals in Gabarevo. So they got married on September 26, 1924. In the church book it is recorded that he was a 40-year-old bachelor and she a 25-year-old widow. Although they lived together, the whole village was convinced that their marriage was fictitious and unconsumed. Obviously the aristocratic Nora was his superior in descent, and he behaved towards her not like a man in love but with the owe and devotion of a bodyguard to his master. Perhaps that was exactly his role, to watch over her life and health, bearing in mind that she was sickly, may be gravely wounded and her tendency to somnambulist walks at night (interestingly, Princess Anastasia suffered from the same!). Therefore, not so much moral motives than the need for his constant presence beside her was the reason for this strange marriage.
Months after their wedding arrived the young Russian Georgiy Pavlovich Zhudin, whom they called Georges. He was tall and lean, suffering from tuberculosis. He died young on December 27, 1930. Neither he nor Nora advertised that they were brother and sister, but people noticed she was very fond of him. She planted two pine-trees at his grave and regularly went to water the flowers. After her death, probably at her instructions, she was buried on his right side, as is the Russian tradition for blood relations.
One more “new-comer” joined the odd emigrant’s group – Konstantin Pavlovich Zhudin. Judging by their names, he should be Georges’s brother, but no one in Gabarevo was left with this impression. What is more, on the back of a photograph of the four with other Russian emigrants before the Shipka Monastery, Nora wrote Zhilin for Georges and Zhilo for Konstantin. Didn’t she want to leave a trace that they were both under assumed names?
Several months later Konstantin Pavlovich left for Sofia and got a job at the French Embassy. Together with Nora he was a witness at the wedding of Lalka Valcheva from Gabarevo in Sofia on October 15, 1939.
What was the role of this “suite” of perfectly different people, gravitating around Nora and Georges? The version of examining magistrate Blagoy Emanuilov is that they were really Prince Alexey and Princess Anastasia and every one of the satellites had a particular role to play in relation to the safeguarding of their lives and secret. Probably Mitrofan had the task to make sure they were implanted in a suitable environment, whether they felt sufficiently protected by their legend, and he went back to report at the relevant place. Konstantin Pavlovich probably had to provide them with French protection against annihilation, while in Western Europe the false card of Anna Anderson was played, whereby Soviet Russia tried to get hold of the immense cash deposits of Tsar Nikolay II in foreign banks.
Whoever Nora, Zhudin and Alexiev were, they left good reminiscences in the hearts of Gabarevites. In the Gabarevo community center hall two chairs in the front row are symbolically reserved for Nora and Dr. Alexiev with special plates. In the obituary notice issued 10 years ago (for the 40th anniversary of her death and 30th anniversary of his death) the inhabitants of Gabarevo wrote the following heart-felt words: “Having had the unfortunate fate of emigrants, these highly noble people found a quiet harbour in Gabarevo and selflessly gave to its population the fruits of their humane professionalism and elevated moral values.” On the initiative of examining magistrate Blagoy Emanuilov, a Prince Alexey and Princess Anastasia foundation was founded in Gabarevo.

Link of the text with picture:
http://www.diplomatic-bg.com/c2/content/view/443/47/
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Old 04-11-2006, 04:43 PM
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Part III

Evidence in support of the version

Of all fantastic rumours people say: “There is no smoke without fire”. So it is with the version Nora-Anastasia. After its publication Petar Hristov Petrov from Kavarna sent a letter to the media (April 1993) setting forth facts in its support. The letter was published only in 1995 in No 28 of the Stara Zagora newspaper Dnes, and read: “In July 1953, Mr. Petrov – then a 16-year-old schoolboy – was taken in the Balchik hospital and was in the same room with a Russian whiteguard Peter Zamyatkin. Fearing he was going to die, the Russian confided in him a strange story. As second lieutenant in the security squadron of the tsar’s family he enjoyed the confidence of Nikolay II. One day he was summoned by the tsar and in the presence of the minister of war and a clergyman he was entrusted with a responsible secret mission – to take out two of the tsar’s children, Alexey and Anastasia, and hide them in his native village near Odessa until a special messenger came to fetch them, if things “worked well”. He was given money, gold and jewelry and he took away the children dressed as villagers. But then the execution of the tsar’s family followed and as no messenger came and it was dangerous to remain in Russia they decided to escape on a boat sailing from Odessa to Alexandria. In the last minute Red Cavalry came to the port and opened fire on the passengers on the deck (he supposed it was aimed at Anastasia). A bullet shot the dog she held in her arms and she was only wounded. After a long journey – from Turkey to Serbia and then to Bulgaria – they arrived in Sofia. Here the boy got sick and was taken in hospital, where Zamyatkin became acquainted with a wealthy patient from Kazanlak. This man proposed to accommodate the homeless in the house of his friends in a village near Kazanlak (Zamyatkin did not mention the name of the village). Following this lead and on the basis of certain juxtapositions, including graphological, examining magistrate Emanuilov conjectured that Zamyatkin and Sergey from Gabarevo (Sergo) were one and the same person.
The truth of Zamyatkin’s story is confirmed by a literary source. The writer Konstantin Paustovski worked in the early 1920s as a journalist in Odessa. In book three of his 6-volume collection “Short Novel about Life” (1968, translated by Atanas Dalchev) in chapter “The Last Shrapnel” we find a description of the same episode of skirmish at the port sometime in February 1920.
In one of his legends of his escape from Russia (he told several), Dr. Alexiev mentioned he was on a boat departing from Odessa and he helped a young girl wounded by the shots. One more coverage in support of Dr. Nyagolov’s version: in Chirpanski Novini newspaper, No 20 of July 13, 1998, the former mayor of Chirpan Petar Popdimitrov wrote that the whiteguard officer Sasho the Russian, with whom they worked in the community center, promised (this was around 1959-60) to confide in him a secret that would “blow his hat off”. But he only said that in the village of Gabarevo, Kazanlak district, there were “graves important for Russia”. Later he died and took the secret with him.
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