The Royal Forums Coat of Arms

Go Back   The Royal Forums > Non-Reigning Houses > The Royal Family of Greece

Join The Royal Forums Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
  #421  
Old 06-02-2012, 06:54 AM
Serene Highness
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: *********, Spain
Posts: 1,176
the property that they have bought haven´t edifications, they are building in it, they live in Porto Hely, when they are in Greece
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #422  
Old 06-02-2012, 04:56 PM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 2,859
They are the only hope for a better future of Greece.

Crown Prince of Greece launches debate forum
.
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #423  
Old 02-03-2013, 10:55 AM
Warren's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 15,427
The subject of Macedonia has no relevance to this thread and those posts will be removed.

Warren
Administrator
__________________
Seeking information? Check out the extensive Royal A-Z
Reply With Quote
  #424  
Old 05-02-2013, 11:16 PM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 2,859
Greece needs the presence of the Royal Family more than ever.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #425  
Old 05-02-2013, 11:33 PM
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Toronto (ON) & London (UK), Canada
Posts: 5,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory View Post
Greece needs the presence of the Royal Family more than ever.
Why? What could they possibly do to make the situation in Greece any better? The Greeks have a long established history of chasing their kings off the throne so I can't see them being viewed as symbols of unity.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #426  
Old 05-03-2013, 12:42 AM
Dman's Avatar
Majesty
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Midwest, United States
Posts: 7,404
Perhaps the Greek Monarchy should be restored. I'm not sure if Constantine will want or even able to take on the job again but perhaps pass the throne down to Pavlos.
__________________
"If you are always trying to be normal you will never know how amazing you can be."

Dr. Maya Angelou
Reply With Quote
  #427  
Old 05-08-2013, 02:20 PM
Gentry
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Reading, United Kingdom
Posts: 85
Things are not black or white.
In all the countries founded in the 19th century -the century of revolutions of independence-, the monarchs were appointed, and their popularity rested on how well they achieved to become 'nativized' after being installed. It is fair to say George I did a very good job in that regard -there was virtually no republicanism during his reign. His son Constantine was initially even more popular -particularly after leading the army at the Balkan wars which doubled Greek territory. For the greatest part of the Greeks, he was the personification of the king they had been asking for in the national prayers since the fall of Constantinople in the 15th century. But then the national division between the supporters of neutrality in WWI, headed by Constantine, and the supporters of entering the war in the side of the Entente, headed by prime minister Venizelos, turned a good portion of the greek public against him -although he remained hugely popular for the greatest part.
After the fateful ending of the Greco-Turkish in the aftermath of WWI, which Venizelos had began but was concluded under the leadership of his political opponents and Constantine -who had been temporarily replaced by his son Alexander during Venizelos' primeministership in the midst of WWI-, the more extreme supporters of Venizelos came into power and abolished the monarchy -although the referendum of the 1920's (fraud, to be sure, as all referendums in the first half of the 20th century) showed that, among the old inhabitants of mainland Greece (that is, excluding the refugees that fled from Asia Minor after the war ended) the popularity of the monarchy had not been significantly affected. In any case, the 2nd Hellenic Republic which lasted 11 years was a complete failure, filled was consequent coups and anarchy, and the monarchy was restored for the first time in 1935, when another referendum brought back Constantine's son, George II. The referendum was certainly fraudent as all of them were, but historians agree that a popular majority had been formed in favor of restoration (see: Richard Clogg's 'A concice history of Modern Greece').

A year later the King imposed a dictatorial regime that prepared Greece for WWII (this time in the side of the western allies), and also purged the handful of communists that then existed; overall though, the success of the regime in pushing back the Italians at the beginning of WWII ensured popularity. A little after though the Germans conquered and occupied Greece for four years, leading the legitimate government and the king to escape to the Middle East. The communist party held the banner of resistance inside the country and grew immensely popular during German occupation, leading it to succumb to the temptation of attempting to conquer power after liberation. It failed thanks to English intervention and support, but the legitimate government promised the king would return only after another referendum. This was held in 1946, and as in the meanwhile the populace had been largely scarred off by communist attrocities and the fear of a generalized civil war, the king's return was again approved. After his restoration, the last and main phase of the Greek civil war commenced -during which George II died and was succeeded by his brother Paul-, and after its ending, thanks to American contribution and aid, two decades of domestic tranquility, growth, but also anti-communist repression continued. The monarchy was identified with the anti-communist state, which caused the youth -that grew increasingly left during these decades- to become allienated and turn against it, but still the worst would have been prevented had not Constantine II, only months after succeeding to the throne, handled in a profoundly unconstructive way the political crisis of 1965, as a result of which the centrist government and its overwhelmingly popular leader George Papandreou (grandfather to the recent prime minister) were edged-out. This caused a chain of instability, which in two years-time led to the military 'intervention' of 1967 -the 'junta' that lasted 7 years. After its ending, the king was blamed by most for the turn which events had taken prior to the dictatorship, and with even the centre-right party of Constantine Karamanlis avoiding to support restoration, Greeks voted overwhelmingly against it in the referendum of 1974.
This is the story -in short- of the Greek monarchy. My conclusion was that it was a lot more popular than in its last days at several points in its history, and also had a handful of opportunities to remain in power and be assimilated more constructively in Greek political life. Unfortunately, bad luck and bad choices prevented this development. They may be blamed for a good portion of that -but not all though. Greece is certainly a tough country to rule -by any standards.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #428  
Old 05-08-2013, 03:59 PM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Atika, Greece
Posts: 198
K. Mitsotakis said: everyone know the solution to the problem after the events have occurred. Your words are reduced to the phrase, "it was a mistake I would have done differently," and the King also.

Mitsotakis,he lived this period of history, he said did not know what to do, the political situation was very confusing and hard to predict, he is a very inteligent, and he did not know what to do. Mitsotakis said that the King took the decision in 1967 in the interest of the people, did not work, but he could not judge to Constantine because, himself (k.Mitsotakis) did not know to do.

And if Karamanlis would have been in the position of King. What would he have decided? best !!!! ha! ..or worse.....
And if Greece would have not entered euro zone , we would not have crisis because we would be more rich ...or poor? , We do not control the past.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #429  
Old 05-17-2013, 06:10 AM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 2,859
Any recent poll regarding a possible Restoration of Monarchy?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #430  
Old 05-20-2013, 06:53 PM
Gentry
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Reading, United Kingdom
Posts: 85
Cory, there is no such debate in Greece, and soon there will also not be any such prospect whatsoever. The case of the royal house is closed for Greece in the generation after Constantine. It could have been otherwise -the princes could have 'sold' the image of the family in a much more productive way, that would at least keep those remaining monarchists faithful. Instead, pro-monarchist feeling has faded even in the ranks of those who were allegient to the family 15 or 20 years ago.
I would put the blame on the children's marriages, for this 'getting out of touch' with Greek popular feeling. Because of the families they have created, both Pavlos and Nikolaos can not and will not be in Greek reality or consciousness anything more than foreign tourists. Sad but true.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #431  
Old 05-21-2013, 08:08 AM
Aristocracy
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Atika, Greece
Posts: 198
the princes of Greece are not disconnected from their country, The politicians of their country have made that the greek people are disconnected of their princes, it is different. the greeks do not know the life of their princes.
The Prince Paul knows the current situation in Greece and know the reason for the current Greek economic situation, many Greeks do not know because it has produced .
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #432  
Old 05-21-2013, 10:27 AM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 2,859
All the Greek I know are strong royalists and there are different groups on Facebook for the Restoration.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #433  
Old 06-12-2013, 05:04 PM
Gentry
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Reading, United Kingdom
Posts: 85
They number just a handfull of people, which -I assure you- you will have a very hard time discovering if ever you visit the place -for as long as you might try..
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #434  
Old 06-13-2013, 04:28 AM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 2,859
The very often visits of the Royal Family in Greexce show the population is not against the Royal Family and everywhere HM the King is welcomed very warmly.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #435  
Old 06-13-2013, 05:29 PM
Warren's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 15,427
Yes Cory, but let's be realistic. Just because the King is warmly welcomed by some of the Greek populace, it doesn't necessarily mean they want either him or the institution to be restored in a political or constitutional sense.

Elizabeth II and Prince Harry are warmly received in the United States; the royal wedding was watched whole or in part by millions of Americans; the birth of the Cambridge child next month will make the front pages of most US big city newspapers. It will be prime time US TV news, possibly even the leading story of the day, and the royal birth will be discussed on all the late night US talk shows. However, none of this translates into a groundswell of support for a change to a monarchical form of government or the United Kingdom of America.

If by some slim chance King Constantine was restored to the Greek throne tomorrow, he would not be running the government by royal decree or appointing himself Prime Minister or Finance Minister. His restoration would have negligible effect on the dire strait of Greek government finances, the crippling public debt, the rate of unemployment, the oversized public sector, the attitude of European central bankers to the Greek economic malaise, the future of the Euro and the European Union, or whether Angela Merkel wins the next election.
__________________
Seeking information? Check out the extensive Royal A-Z
Reply With Quote
  #436  
Old 06-13-2013, 05:49 PM
fandesacs2003's Avatar
Heir Apparent
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Athens, Greece
Posts: 3,295
Most of the young generation of Greeks have even not a clear idea who is really King Costantin. Some of "people press" readers know the young Princes thanks to the glittering Marie-Chantal and Tatiana, but they are unable to put a correctly the facts and period about the Monarchy in Greece
As for the older generation who lived the monarchy in Greece, just note a fact. In the 1974 referendum, the monarchy received roughly 30% pro. 40 years after there is no reason that this 30% has increased, many of this voters do not live anymore.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #437  
Old 06-13-2013, 08:16 PM
Gentry
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Reading, United Kingdom
Posts: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory View Post
The very often visits of the Royal Family in Greexce show the population is not against the Royal Family and everywhere HM the King is welcomed very warmly.
I would say indifferently more than warmly. I've been present in one such -out of coincidence. No one turns up to protest or shout against them, but no hordes of fans either. Most just bypass them.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #438  
Old 06-14-2013, 03:18 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Los Angeles, United States
Posts: 6
Speaking as a rare American monarchist, I've always felt that countries with monarchical histories should do all they can to maintain the institution at all costs. To get rid of it usually leads to political, social and economic hardship for generations (Germany, Austria, Russia), but the paradigm is a bit different for countries such as Greece, Romania or Bulgaria where the monarchy was imported from abroad. I have no doubt that the present descendants of those royal families are fiercely patriotic and love the countries over which their families used to reign, but I begrudgingly agree with tamta... there's really not that much interest in Greece for the return of the monarchy. And was Warren so ably pointed out, Greece is suffering so much right now that a debate about the return of the monarchy would be out of place and to some offensive. I could see a future for the Greek royal family in Greek life if they were to model themselves after the Romanian royal family: be out among the people, be seen, be heard, act like you're reigning, act like royalty, live like royalty, and do all you can to help the people, to raise their morale, etc. The country may continue to be a republic, but it could be a "crowned republic." A privitized monarchy, if you will. That model seems to be working well in Romania and also in Serbia. Perhaps if Pavlos and Marie-Chantal lived full time in Greece and raised their children there, they would bring the people around to valuing them and seeing them as an asset rather than as a relic of the past. I doubt the political system of Greece will ever change again, as the King himself said in an interview with CNN's Richard Quest a few years ago, but they can still be of service to the people. They just have to be there full time and put themselves at their former subject's disposal. If they were to do that, who knows what could happen? Just my $1.50 worth.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #439  
Old 06-15-2013, 02:06 AM
Heir Presumptive
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 2,859
The Greeks should know better HRH Crown Prince Pavlos and HRH Crown Princess Marie Chantal.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #440  
Old 06-22-2013, 07:24 PM
Gentry
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Reading, United Kingdom
Posts: 85
I agree with orrinhoover, except in one point:

Yes, what you describe is what the royal house should probably do/have done, in order to retain a place in Greek public life and some relation to the people. But may I add, in order to do that, and be able to relate to the Greeks of today and remind them of their own patriotism and Greekness, they -the children of Constantine- should have followed the example of all the other European royals of their generation and marry commoners of their nationality. There is simply NO way at all, that any modern Greek could plausibly relate to the family that a prince who has spent only a few weeks of his whole life in the country has created with an American duty-free new-money heiress. I am currently based in Greece, and should anyone spend only sometime here they would realize why. The case with Nikolaos could be different -he was alot of people's favorite to begin with-, but unfortunately he went down the same road with his marriage.
The relation of the royal house with Greek reality ends with Constantine. they will look completely alien to Greek in the generations after him. Sad but true.
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Queen Ingrid Josefine Danish Royal History 93 08-24-2013 12:47 PM
Royal Quotes (famous ones and/or great ones) Queen Malka Royal Life and Lifestyle 134 07-12-2013 01:22 PM
Why do you like Diana? juliamontague Diana, Princess of Wales (1961-1997) 222 12-21-2011 03:40 AM
Interview with Crown Princess Mary by Anne Wolden-Ræthinge: April-May 2004 Chatleen Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary and Family 55 02-07-2011 06:33 AM




Popular Tags
belgium carl philip charlene chris o'neill crown prince frederik crown prince haakon crown princess mary crown princess mette-marit crown princess victoria current events engagement fashion germany grand duke henri hohenzollern infanta sofia jewellery jordan king carl xvi gustav king felipe king felipe vi king harald king juan carlos king philippe king willem-alexander letizia luxembourg nobility official visit olympics ottoman president hollande president komorowski prince albert prince albert ii prince carl philip prince daniel prince floris prince maurits prince pieter-christiaan princess aimee princess alexia (2005 -) princess anita princess beatrix princess charlene princess claire princess laurentien princess madeleine princess margriet princess marilene princess mary princess mary fashion queen letizia queen mathilde queen maxima queen paola queen rania queen silvia queen sofia royal royal fashion russia sofia hellqvist spain state visit sweden the hague visit wedding winter olympics 2014



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:49 PM.

Social Knowledge Networks

eXTReMe Tracker
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014
Jelsoft Enterprises

Royal News Delivered to your Email!

You can get the latest Royal News right in your inbox.

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]